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Blueprint for Developing a School Food Safety Program.

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Presentation on theme: "Blueprint for Developing a School Food Safety Program."— Presentation transcript:

1 Blueprint for Developing a School Food Safety Program

2 Course Objective Develop a written food safety plan for each school food preparation and service site based on the Process Approach to HACCP principles

3 Public Law 108-265 Amended section 9(h) of the Richard B. Russell National School Lunch Act Section 111. Food Safety (5) School Food Safety Program – Each school food authority shall implement a school food safety program in the preparation and service of each meal served to children, that complies with any Hazard Analysis and Critical Control Point system established by the Secretary.

4 Other Reauthorization Requirements Related to Food Safety A report on the most recent inspection must now be posted in a ‘publicly visible location.’ Copies of the report must be provided to members of the public upon request. The required number of health inspections per year was increased from 1 to 2.

5 Why are we being asked to do this? 1.Children are more at risk. 2.Food has many opportunities for contamination. 3.Microorganisms continue to evolve. 4.New microorganisms have been discovered in recent years. 5.We have too much at stake.

6 Tools “Guidance for School Food Authorities: Developing a School Food Safety Program Based on the Process Approach to HACCP Principles.” USDA FNS June 2005. (79 pages) http://www.fns.usda.gov/cnd/CNlab eling/Food- Safety/HACCPGuidance.pdfhttp://www.fns.usda.gov/cnd/CNlab eling/Food- Safety/HACCPGuidance.pdf

7 Tools “HACCP Based Standard Operating Procedures”, National Food Service Management Institute, 2005. (115 pages) http://sop.nfsmi.org/HACCPBas edSOPs/HACCPBasedSOPs.doc

8 Michigan Department of Agriculture www.michigan.gov/mda Click on Food & Agribusiness Click on Food Safety Click on Food Law * 12 Food Law Fact Sheets (based on 1999 FDA Food Code adopted by MI) Click on Other Documents * 1-6 are good references

9 What is HACCP? Stands for Hazard Analysis Critical Control Point. Was designed in the 1960s to create 100% risk- free food for U.S. astronauts. Is preventative rather than reactive. Is a common-sense approach to food safety.

10 Definitions Hazard Analysis and Critical Control Point (HACCP) A prevention-based food safety program that identifies and monitors specific food safety hazards that can adversely affect the safety of food products by focusing on each step of the food preparation process.

11 Definitions HACCP Plan A written document that is based on the principles of HACCP and describes the procedures to be followed to ensure the control of a specific process or procedure.

12 Control Measures Definition: Any action or activity that can be used to prevent, eliminate or reduce an identified hazard. Control measures determined to be essential for food safety are applied at critical control points in the flow of food. Examples of control measures are: SOPs, Critical Control Point (CCPs) or Critical Limits

13 Standard Operating Procedures (SOPs) Definition of SOP: A written method of controlling a practice in accordance with predetermined specifications to obtain a desired outcome.

14 Critical Control Point (CCP) Definition of CCP: An operational step in a food preparation process at which a control measure can be applied and is essential to prevent or eliminate a hazard or reduce it to an acceptable level.

15 Critical Limit Definition of Critical Limit: One or more prescribed parameters that must be met to ensure a CCP effectively controls a hazard.

16 Preliminary Steps for Building the Program Have a firm foundation in place Perform Baseline Assessment –Prerequisite Program Checklist –Food Safety and HACCP SOP Checklist

17 Steps to Develop a School Food Safety Program 1.Develop, document & implement SOPs 2.Identify & document menu items according to Process Approach 3.Identify & document Control Measures and Critical Limits 4.Establish monitoring procedures 5.Establish corrective action 6.Keep records 7.Review & revise HACCP

18 Step One: Standard Operating Procedures (SOPs) Remember – SOPs have already been developed by NFSMI. You just need to customize them!

19 SOPs Determine which SOPs are needed for each site serving food Suggestion: - Assign each site manager the task of putting together a SOP manual for their site

20 NFSMI Sample SOP Washing Hands (Sample SOP) PURPOSE: To prevent foodborne illness by contaminated hands. SCOPE: This procedure applies to anyone who handle, prepare, and serve food. KEY WORDS: Handwashing, Cross-Contamination INSTRUCTIONS: Train foodservice employees on using the procedures in this SOP. Follow State or local health department requirements. Post handwashing signs or posters in a language understood by all foodservice staff near all handwashing sinks, in food preparation areas, and restrooms. Use designated handwashing sinks for handwashing only. Do not use food

21 Step Two: Categorize Menu Items According to Process Approach Categorize menu items into one of three processes: 1. Process 1 – No Cook 2. Process 2 – Cook and Serve Same Day 3. Process 3 – Complex Food Preparation

22 The Division of Foods is Based on Complete Trips Through the Temperature Danger Zone No Cook Process 1 Same Day Process 2 Complex Process 3 41 o F 140 o F 0 1 1 2 3

23 The “Other” Category Foods that can be left out of the 3 processes –Breads (without cheese) –Baked desserts such as cookies, cakes and brownies (i.e. those without fruit or custard) –Other non-potentially hazardous foods that are not associated with foodborne illnesses  Just handle with SOPs

24 Potentially Hazardous Foods Any food or food ingredient capable of supporting rapid growth of microorganisms. Raw or cooked foods of animal origin –meats, poultry, dairy, eggs, fish, seafood Cooked foods of plant origin –Vegetables such as potatoes and beans –Starches such as rice and pasta Some other foods –cut melons, garlic in oil, tofu

25 Communication Tools Write it on the recipe Process 2 – Same Day

26 Step Three: Identify Control Measures and Critical Limits

27 Control Measures for Process #1 No Cook Example: Deli Meat RECEIVE Receiving Deliveries STORE Preventing Cross Contamination During Storage (and Preparation) PREPARE Preventing Cross-Contamination During (Storage and) Preparation, Cleaning & Sanitizing Food Contact Surfaces, Washing Fresh Fruits & Vegetables COLD HOLD CCP: Hold at or below 41 degrees F. Check & Record Temperatures. SERVE Serving Food, Preventing Cross-Contamination at Food Bars ALL Washing Hands, Using Suitable Utensils When Handling Ready-to-Eat Foods, Personal Hygiene, Storing & Using Poisonous or Toxic Chemicals, Using & Calibrating a Food Thermometer

28 Control Measures for Process #2 Cook & Serve Same Day Example: Chicken Nuggets PREPARE Preventing Cross-Contamination During (Storage and) Preparation, Cleaning & Sanitizing Food Contact Surfaces, Washing Fresh Fruits & Vegetables RECEIVE Receiving Deliveries STORE Preventing Cross Contamination During Storage (and Preparation) COOK CCP: Cook to Minimum Internal Temperatures for at Least 15 Seconds. Check & Record Temperatures HOT HOLD CCP: Hold At or Above 140 Degrees F. Check & Record Temperatures. SERVE Serving Food, Preventing Cross-Contamination at Food Bars ALL Washing Hands, Using Suitable Utensils When Handling Ready- to-Eat Foods, Personal Hygiene, Storing & Using Poisonous or Toxic Chemicals, Using & Calibrating a Food Thermometer

29 Control Measures for Process #3 Complex Example: Leftovers ALL Washing Hands, Using Suitable Utensils When Handling Ready-to-Eat Foods, Personal Hygiene, Storing & Using Poisonous or Toxic Chemicals, Using & Calibrating a Food Thermometer RECEIVE Receiving Deliveries STORE Preventing Cross Contamination During Storage (and Preparation) PREPARE Preventing Cross-Contamination During (Storage and) Preparation, Cleaning & Sanitizing Food Contact Surfaces, Washing Fresh Fruits & Vegetables COOK CCP: Cook to Minimum Internal Temperatures for at Least 15 Seconds. Check & Record Temperatures COOL CCP: Cool to Internal Temperature of 70 Degrees F or Less within 2 hours & to 41 Degrees F or less within an Additional 4 hours. Check & Record Temperatures. REHEAT CCP: Reheat to Internal Temperature of 165 Degrees or More within 2 hours. Check & Record Temperatures. HOT HOLD CCP: Hold At or Above 140 Degrees F. Check & Record Temperatures. SERVE Serving Food, Preventing Cross-Contamination at Food Bars

30 Step 4: Establish Monitoring Procedures Why should monitoring take place? –To ensure that the written HACCP plan is being followed correctly and is working well How will monitoring be done? –Observations, check sheets, signing off on logs Who will monitor? –Supervisory or other designated employees How often will they monitor? –As needed - continuously, daily, weekly, monthly

31 Step 5: Establish Corrective Actions What is a corrective action? –A planned step you take when a food does not meet a critical limit Key features of corrective actions –Measurable, specific, based on facts, appropriate for normal working conditions Goal of corrective action –Determine and eliminate the cause –Bring the CCP within critical limits –Prevent the deviation from reoccurring –Ensure safety of the food served

32 Step 5: Establish Corrective Actions Summary of Corrective Actions for HACCP- Based SOPs - Sample shown on pages 34-39 are printed from NFSMI manual (pages 99- 104) - Remember to change any temperatures to reflect 1999 Food Code

33 Step 6: Keep Records How often do you need to record these things? –Throughout the day, daily, weekly, monthly What do you need to keep a record of? –Corrective action –Thermometer calibration –Checklists used to monitor food safety –Food safety training completed –Temperatures At receiving Of storage areas – Refrigerators, freezers, dry storage Of food – end of cooking & reheating, while holding, serving & cooling

34 Step 7: Review & Revise the System and Plan Annually What is working? What isn’t? How can your HACCP system be better?

35 After this class… Complete the pre-requisite checklist developed by Iowa State University. Plan a time to train your staff on the new requirements. Start writing a Food Safety Plan for each of your production kitchens and serving sites that participates in the NSLP or SBP.

36 Additional Resources

37 Food Safety Training Resources National Food Service Management Institute Thermometer Information Resource http://www.nfsmi.org/ Information/thermom eter_resource.htmlhttp://www.nfsmi.org/ Information/thermom eter_resource.html

38 Food Safety Training Resources Local Health Departments http://www.malph.org/ Click on Directory to find the contact information for county health departments

39 Food Safety Training Resources Register for Food Safety and Sanitation classes through Education and Training Connection: http://www.etc-1.com/foodserv.htm

40 Food Safety Training Resources National Food Service Management Institute Serving It Safe, 2 nd edition http://www.nfsmi.org/Information/si sindex.htmlhttp://www.nfsmi.org/Information/si sindex.html

41 Food Safety Training Resources National Food Service Management Institute Wash Your Hands http://www.nfsmi. org/Information/ha ndsindex.htmlhttp://www.nfsmi. org/Information/ha ndsindex.html

42 Additional Training The Statewide Training Program for School Nutrition Professionals offers a 3 hour course “Blueprint for Developing a School Food Safety Plan” Access the Statewide Training Program web page at: www.etc-1.com

43 Additional Training Information on the Statewide Training Program web page includes: –Current course schedule & calendar –Forms for class registration –Class scheduling forms –List of qualified instructors –Course fact sheets

44 MDE Contact Questions regarding the required School Food Safety Program can be directed to Linda Stull at: Stulll@michigan.gov or (517) 241-3884


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