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1 Blueprint Planning in California: Forging Consensus on Regional Development Elisa Barbour and Michael Teitz Elisa Barbour and Michael Teitz Public Policy.

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Presentation on theme: "1 Blueprint Planning in California: Forging Consensus on Regional Development Elisa Barbour and Michael Teitz Elisa Barbour and Michael Teitz Public Policy."— Presentation transcript:

1 1 Blueprint Planning in California: Forging Consensus on Regional Development Elisa Barbour and Michael Teitz Elisa Barbour and Michael Teitz Public Policy Institute of California Presentation to the Blueprint Learning Network, Sacramento, May 12, 2006

2 2 PPIC’s Blueprint Research Project  Evolved from inter-agency advisory group led by Resources/BTH  Focus on regional planning in California’s four largest metropolitan areas  Seeking “best practices” and lessons from blueprint planning  Research based on 55 key informant interviews and a survey of planning directors

3 3Overview  Why did blueprint planning emerge?  What is blueprint planning?  How is it done? –Lessons and best practices  Conclusions

4 4 Why Did Blueprint Planning Emerge?  Increased pressure to coordinate planning –Across policy areas (land use, housing, environment, infrastructure) –Across levels of government  Blueprint planning is the response –Re-inventing growth management

5 5 Traditional Growth Planning: Build to Accommodate Demand  In the post-WWII era, California accommodated new growth by building  Growth management was fractured at regional scale

6 6 1980s Onward: Growth Pressure Led to Conflict and Stress  Greenfield development cheaper in the short run  Regional facilities grew strained  Public wary of new spending  Conflicts emerged –Environmental and economic goals –“Pro-growth” and “anti-growth” forces

7 7 Today’s Response: Plan for Efficiency and Sustainability  Fiscal and environmental constraint require coordinated actions  Land use and housing policy are key levers –Mobility and air quality benefits –Affordable housing, jobs-housing balance –Preserve open space, ag land, and habitat

8 8 Growth Challenges Are Now Governance Challenges  Planning needs to engage multiple parties  A regional framework can –Match the scale of social and environmental outcomes –Reconcile local, regional, state interests –Re-connect land use, transportation, and environmental planning

9 9 Institutional Reforms of the 1990s Set the Stage  COGs/MPOs gained more authority and responsibility –ISTEA, CAA, SB 45  Bioregional environmental planning linked to land use provides new models –NCCP, watershed planning

10 10 Blueprint Planning Provides Expanded Framework Forces and MandatesActors Growth concernsLocal Housinggovernments Infrastructure Environment Regional agencies Loss of open space, ag land State Related mandates agencies RTP, CAA CEQA Blueprint Organized RHNA stakeholders Planning General plans ESA -- NCCP/HCPs Community Emerging policy topicsgroups Energy systems Water supply and qualityPublic opinion Economic development EducationMedia Flood control

11 11Overview  Why did blueprint planning emerge?  What is blueprint planning?  How is it done? –Lessons and best practices  Conclusions

12 12 What is Blueprint Planning?  A consensus-building process for regional development  Integrates transportation, land use, and environmental planning, regionally and locally  Relies on –Scenario modeling of measurable outcomes –Broad-based “visioning” process  Promotes local land uses with regional benefits

13 13 Blueprint Planning Considers Land Use Regionally  Developed from traditional transportation modeling  Focuses on COG/MPO population and land use projections  Considering land use regionally, not just locally, alters the traditional relationship  Models land use alternatives to improve transportation and environmental outcomes  Avoids contentiousness of RHNA

14 14 Blueprint Planning Requires Broad Consensus-Building  Interacting land use and transportation requires a broad conversation  Smart growth strategies depend on local support  “Visioning” process –COG/MPOs, stakeholders, public –Define values, objectives, measures –Test land use alternatives –Coordinate needs –Build a “preferred scenario”

15 15 COGs/MPOs and Coordinated Planning  Collaborative, consensus-building institutions  Best connection among land use, transportation, and environmental authority  Blend systems focus (MPOs) with broad participation (COGs)  No land use control  Redistributing resources a challenge

16 16 Blueprint Plans Implemented Through Incentives  Requires strong institutional ties between transportation and land use  COGs/MPOs have directed regional funds as incentives  Process requires new criteria for allocating resources –Can be contentious –Produces a dilemma

17 17Overview  Why did blueprint planning emerge?  What is blueprint planning?  How is it done? –Lessons and best practices  Conclusions

18 18 Stages in Blueprint Development  Organizing a visioning process  Visioning  Implementation  Assessment

19 19 Organizing a Visioning Process  Build technical capacity –Parcel-based maps and data –Interactive modeling  Build institutional capacity –COG/MPO board commitment –Integrated planning  Develop goals, objectives, and performance measures

20 20 Visioning Stage  Build a preferred scenario in stages, with buy- in at every level  Consider trade-offs  COG/MPO adopts preferred scenario –No surprises  How much of a gap between preferred scenario and current plans?

21 21 Larger Regions Face Organizational Challenges  Much harder to have “one regional conversation”  Can devolve to sub-regional scale, but must retain link between systems focus and broad participation  How to nest plans at different scales?

22 22 Smaller Regions More Familiar with Blueprint Processes Not familiarSomewhat familiarVery familiar Los Angeles and SF Bay areas Sacramento and San Diego areas Planning directors (%)

23 23 Implementation: Making It Happen  Target priority development areas  Develop criteria for prioritizing resources  Direct regional resources to priority areas –Technical assistance –Competitive grants –Condition new investment

24 24 Organizational Strategies  Best practices combine –System focus + broad participation –Performance criteria + flexible implementation  Examples –Corridor planning –Ongoing, iterative planning –Coordinate with CTCs/CMAs, sub-regional COGs –Align planning cycles (RHNA, RTP, General Plans) –Policy-based RHNA

25 25 Assessment: Measuring Progress  Produce regular “regional indicators” reports to evaluate progress  Integrate with RTP performance measures  May help resolve conflicts over directing resources

26 26Overview  Why did blueprint planning emerge?  What is blueprint planning?  How is it done? –Lessons and best practices  Conclusions

27 27 Blueprint Planning Shows a Way Forward…  Changing how people see urban development  Creatively addresses critical issues  Fits political reality  We can’t yet determine outcomes on the ground

28 28 …But Substantial Obstacles Remain  COGs/MPOs have institutional weaknesses  State support is necessary  Development in greenfield areas has been neglected  Environmental planning lags

29 29 Ingredients of Effective Regional Strategies  Combine system focus + broad participation  Combine performance criteria + flexible implementation  Align and coordinate state, regional, and local incentives, priorities, and plans  Provide real incentives for local governments to participate  Develop an ongoing process, not a static vision

30 30 Frontiers for Blueprint Planning  State-regional interaction on goals and strategies  Incorporation of new policy concerns  Making it work in very large regions  Inter-regional and mega-regional issues


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