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Summer Kuba & Ellen Chance Together Is Better: Engaging Students & Evaluating Outcomes.

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Presentation on theme: "Summer Kuba & Ellen Chance Together Is Better: Engaging Students & Evaluating Outcomes."— Presentation transcript:

1 Summer Kuba & Ellen Chance Together Is Better: Engaging Students & Evaluating Outcomes

2 Today’s Agenda: Introductions Parking Lot Find Someone Who Our Goals & Objectives Jot Thoughts Cooperative Learning Team Building Brain Gym Data Drives Instruction Class Building Back to Objectives WIIFM

3 Introductions: Summer Perhay Kuba FSCA Board Member EBSCC Member ACA Member ACES Member ASCA Member Professional School Palm Pointe Educational Research School Doctoral Florida Atlantic University Ellen Chance FSCA Member ASCA Member Doctoral Florida Atlantic University Professional School Pierce Hammock Elementary School in Palm Beach County Florida Atlantic Graduate Assistant on randomized controlled trial (RCT) of a school based intervention, Student Success Skills.

4 Parking Lot This is a place for you to place any additional questions you may have. Please include your name and contact so we can reach you.

5 Let’s break the ICE ! Find Someone Who… 1. Lives in another state. 2. Works with elementary students. 3. Works with middle school students. 4. Works in the high school setting. 5. Exercised this week. 6. Skipped a session to sleep in this morning. 7. Is here with family and/or children. 8. Loves being a school counselor. 9. Is a member of a professional organization. Which ones? 10. Has a pet.

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7 Today’s Objectives 1. Attendees will be able to identify at least 4 cooperative learning strategies that can be incorporated into small group & classroom guidance lessons. 2. Attendees will be able to embed cooperative learning strategies into their already utilized core curriculum by planning activities which align with the ASCA National Model and that promote academic, career or social-emotional development. 3. Attendees will be able to identify at least 4 methods for tracking outcome data.

8 We Learn: 10% of what we read 20% of what we hear 30% of what we see 50% of what we both see and hear 70% of what is discussed with others 80% of what we experience personally 95% of what we teach someone else William Glasser

9 “Jot” down, what you think of when you hear, “cooperative learning”. (Be honest and creative) Think Time Team Share Whole Group Share

10 So what is it? Cooperative Learning Johnson, Johnson, and Smith (1991) suggested that cooperative learning is more than simply “working in groups,” and should include the following……

11 1) Positive Interdependence where team members are reliant on one another to achieve a common goal, and the entire group suffers the consequences if one member fails to do his or her work.

12 2) Individual Accountability where each member of the group is held accountable for doing his or her share of the work.

13 3) Face-to-face Promotive Interaction where, although some of the group work may be done on an individual basis, most of the tasks are performed through an interactive process in which each group member provides feedback, challenges one another, and teaches and encourages his or her group mates.

14 4) Appropriate use of Collaborative and Cooperative Skills where students are provided with the opportunity to develop and implement trust- building, leadership, decision-making, communication, and conflict management skills.

15 5) Group Processing in which team members establish group goals, the assessment of their performance as a team occurs periodically, and they often identify changes that need to be made in order for the group to function more effectively.

16 4 Basic Principles Equal Participation * Drives Students sense of importance –gets rid of hogs and logs* Equal time-Equal turns Simultaneous Interaction *Drives engagement* Visual/audible interaction=engagement Individual Accountability *Drives Achievement* Each student must perform in front of another. They cannot hide. Positive Interdependence *Drives Cooperation* A gain for 1 benefits another Everyone must contribute PI ES Spencer Kagan

17 Team Building

18 What does it like? What does this teaching strategy (cooperative learning) look like in your small groups and/or classroom guidance lessons right now? What do you do to create engagement? What could you add to your lessons? Think Time Pair Share Group Share What did you hear someone say?

19 Let’s BOUNCE ! Team Work is FUN!

20 Brain Gym

21 Data: A School Counselor’s Best Friend “How are students different as a result of what we do?” It is no longer enough for Professional School Counselors to answer the question, “What do school counselors do?” Professional School Counselors must now respond to the question, “How are students different as a result of what we do?” (ASCA National Model, 2014).

22 DATA Student Achievement Data Achievement Related Fata Standards & Competency Related Data Disaggregate Data Comprehensive School Counseling Program Evaluation Data Data Over Time Data Drives Decisions

23 Process Data Where and how is your time spent? Recommended Tools For School Counselors: EZ Analyze (Time-Tracking Tool) Tracks time spent providing direct and indirect services Tracks time with individual students, small groups, classroom guidance, parent meetings etc. Creates graphs, analyzes data automatically. Calendars Google Calendar

24 Perception Data Measures Competency Achieved Every 5 th grade student have completed a career interest inventory Knowledge Gained 96% of student report gaining knowledge of how to handle and report bullying in their school. Attitudes/Beliefs of Students 85% of students feel safe at school. Tools to Measure: Pre-Post Tests Activity Completion Evaluations Surveys & Rating Scales

25 Example: Pre/Post Survey

26 Outcome Data How effective are we? What changes have we seen? Proof is in the data! Examples: Attendance improved among 5 th graders by 53%. Referrals decreased by 39% among the at-risk cohort. Outcome Data Tools: Vary by school district. Example (Educational Data Warehouse EDW) School Improvement Plans/Student Development Plans EZAnalyze

27 Strategies: Making Data Less Daunting! Organized Start and Stay Organized Record Keeping Ensure efficient Record Keeping by utilizing effective tools (example EZAnalyze) to track time & outcomes. Needs Assessments Provide Needs Assessments at Beginning of Year Pre-Post Tests Use of Pre-Post Tests for every small group and classroom lesson. Surveys & Rating Scales Surveys & Rating Scales Suggestion: Use Google Forms or Survey Monkey to disseminate needs assessments & Pre-Post surveys to students, teachers & parents online. Data is collected and analyzed seamlessly. resources Utilize excellent resources to assist you!

28 Example Online Needs Assessment

29 Data Resources Dimmitt, C., & Carey, J. (2007). Evidence-based school counseling: Making a difference with data-driven practices. Thousand Oaks, CA: Corwin Press. Hatch, T., & Wilkinson, D. (2014). The use of data in school counseling: Hatching results for students, programs, and the profession. Thousand Oaks, Calif.: Corwin. Kaffenberger, C., & Young, A. (2007). Making data work. Alexandria, VA: American School Counselor Association. Stone, C., & Dahir, C. (2006). The transformed school counselor. Boston: Lahaska Press.

30 Class Building Classroom Guidance Lessons Stand Up Move Around Work with Others

31 Class Building Example: Hand Up-Stand Up-Pair Up Each pair shares 1 way you collect and/or analyze data at your school. Don’t forget to thank the person for sharing! Move on.

32 Back to Our Objectives 1. Attendees will be able to identify at least 4 cooperative learning strategies that can be incorporated into small group & classroom guidance lessons. Pair Share Jot Thoughts Find Someone Who Think Time Team Share Whole Group Share Hand Up-Stand Up-Pair Up

33 Back to Our Objectives 2. Attendees will be able to embed cooperative learning strategies into their already utilized core curriculum by planning activities which align with the ASCA National Model and that promote academic, career or social-emotional development. Academic A:A3.2 Demonstrate the ability to work both independently and cooperatively with other students Personal/Social PS:A1.9 Demonstrate cooperative behavior in groups Career C:A1.4 Learn how to interact and work cooperatively in teams

34 Back to Our Objectives 3. Attendees will be able to identify at least 3 methods for tracking outcome data. Process Data Perception Data Outcome Data

35 What’s In It For Me? WIIFM Create a caring, cooperative classroom Make your lessons come alive Use strategies to reach all your students Foster belonging for students of all ability levels Identify ways to track outcomes Establish a classroom environment where everyone wants to be—including you Reduce discipline problems Improve student relations in your class and beyond Build Your Students’ Social Skills Promote caring, kindness, empathy, respect, and responsibility Develop your students’ character in the context of learning together Improve student relations in your class and beyond Together Everyone Achieves More Increase students ability to value differences in teammates and themselves Develop synergy to increase energy and cooperation Make learning more fun for everyone Engage ALL students

36 Take-A-Ways Set 1 goal related to tracking student data Set 1 goal related to keeping your students engaged.

37 Parking Lot This is a place for you to place any additional questions you may have. Please include your name and contact so we can reach you.

38 Thank you Please us if you have any questions. Summer Kuba Ellen Chance

39 References American School Counselor Association (2004). The ASCA national model: A framework for school counseling programs (2nd ed.). Alexandria, VA: Author Dimmitt, C., & Carey, J. (2007). Evidence-based school counseling: Making a difference with data-driven practices. Thousand Oaks, CA: Corwin Press. Hatch, T., & Wilkinson, D. (2014). The use of data in school counseling: Hatching results for students, programs, and the profession. Thousand Oaks, Calif.: Corwin. Kaffenberger, C., & Young, A. (2007). Making data work. Alexandria, VA: American School Counselor Association. Kagan, S. (1994). Cooperative learning. San Juan Capistrano, CA: Kagan Cooperative Learning. Kagan, S., & Rodriguez, C. (2000). Silly sports and goofy games. San Juan Capistrano, CA: Kagan Publishing. Stone, C., & Dahir, C. (2006). The transformed school counselor. Boston: Lahaska Press. Tsay, M., & Brady, M. (2010). A case study of cooperative learning and communication pedagogy: Does working in teams make a difference? The Journal of Scholarship of Teaching and Learning, 10,


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