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Seeing Families Whole.  Gary Johnson:  Credentials: M.Ed. University of Missouri – St Louis, Family Development Credentialing (FDC) Senior Facilitator.

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Presentation on theme: "Seeing Families Whole.  Gary Johnson:  Credentials: M.Ed. University of Missouri – St Louis, Family Development Credentialing (FDC) Senior Facilitator."— Presentation transcript:

1 Seeing Families Whole

2  Gary Johnson:  Credentials: M.Ed. University of Missouri – St Louis, Family Development Credentialing (FDC) Senior Facilitator and Facilitator Trainer  Current Employment: Director of Parenting Life Skills Center – A Great Circle Agency 600 S Jefferson Springfield, MO    Tracey Sheets:  Credentials: BS from Drury University, majors Psychology & Sociology, Certified Mediator, Foster Care Case Manager, Parent Educator and In-Home Service Provider  Current Employment: Parenting Life Skills Center – Parent Educator and In- Home Service Provider  600 S Jefferson Springfield, MO  

3 A Bone Deep Longing “ Within each person lies a bone-deep longing for freedom, self-respect, hope, and the chance to make an important contribution to one's family, community, and the world... No government program can help families become self-reliant, integrated members of their communities unless it is built on a recognition of the power of this bone-deep longing for freedom, self-respect, hope and the chance to contribute.“ Christiann Dean, creator of the FDC Curriculum

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5 MAPS We USE  Eco-Map  Genogram  Family Circles Assessment  Mission Map  Passion Map  Integral AQAL The map is not the territory

6 Four Quads

7 AQAL: Five Aspects  Quadrants  Lines  Levels  States  Types

8 Lines and Levels: Ken Wilber’s: Integral Psychograph

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10 Integral Assessment Upper Left Upper Left Subjective: ‘I’ - personal values, intentions, meanings, mindsets and desires Upper Right Upper Right Objective: ‘It’ - vis ible individual behavior and skills, neurology Spiral Dynamics Value Memes Ego Development Levels/Action Logics Kegan's Orders of Consciousness Maslow's Hierarchy of Needs (+ beyond) Myers-Briggs Personality Types Enneagram Types Emotional Intelligence/EQ Multiple Intelligences Perry's Intellectual/ethical levels Kohlberg’s moral reasoning stages Fowler's Stages of Faith IQ Spiral Dynamics Value Memes Ego Development Levels/Action Logics Kegan's Orders of Consciousness Maslow's Hierarchy of Needs (+ beyond) Myers-Briggs Personality Types Enneagram Types Emotional Intelligence/EQ Multiple Intelligences Perry's Intellectual/ethical levels Kohlberg’s moral reasoning stages Fowler's Stages of Faith IQ (+ Dog IQ videos!) Dog IQ Belbin team roles test Adizes Management Styles Jaques’ Levels of Complexity/time horizons Managerial Grid Belbin team roles test Adizes Management Styles Jaques’ Levels of Complexity/time horizons Managerial Grid (People vs task focus) Brain sex test etc Kolb’s Learning Styles Sexual Essence (Deida) Brain sex test etc Kolb’s Learning Styles Sexual Essence

11 Integral Assessment Continued Lower Left Lower Left Intersubjective: ‘We’ - culture, customs and shared values Lower Right Lower Right Interobjective: ‘Its’ - business systems, processes, environment and technology Inglehart's Post-materialist Value Shift Bridges’ Organizational Character Index Cultural Creatives Creative Class Inglehart's Post-materialist Value Shift Bridges’ Organizational Character Index Cultural Creatives Creative Class Ten Lenses (cultural diversity) Vitamin T (social capital) Organizational CreativityTen Lenses Vitamin TOrganizational Creativity Torbert Organizational Stages Corporate Lifecycle stage The 'Learning organization' and Knowledge Management Ecological Footprint Political Compass Organizational 'Excellence' Social Network Analysis

12 CDC Effective Program Components  Child Development Knowledge and Care  Positive Interactions with Child  Responsiveness, Sensitivity, and Nurturing  Emotional Communication  Disciplinary Communication  Discipline and Behavior Management  Promoting Children’s Social Skills or Prosocial Behavior  Promoting Children’s Cognitive or Academic Skills

13 CDC Continued  Curriculum or Manual  Modeling  Homework  Rehearsal, Role Playing, or Practice  Separate Child Instruction  Ancillary Services

14 Protective Factors  enhancing parent resilience providing an array of social connections facilitating parent knowledge & skills as it relates to child development providing concrete support for parents supporting healthy social & emotional development in young children promoting nurturing and attachment by parents and other caregivers

15 Characteristics of Successful Evidence- Based Parent Education Programs:  Strength-based focus.  Family-centered practice.  Individual and group approaches.  Targeted service groups.  Clear program goals and continuous evaluation  Qualified staff.  Collaborations.

16 References  AQAL image google search [images]. (n.d.). Retrieved from ‌ search?q=AQAL&hl=en&rls=com.microsoft: *&prmd=ivns&tbm=isch&tbo=u&source=univ&sa=X&ei=R6G1TcjSPJ KztwfiuNDnDg&ved=0CCQQsAQ&biw=1259&bih=654  Beckmann, K. A., Knitzer, J., Cooper, J., & Dicker, S. (2010, February). Supporting parents of young children in the child welfare system. National Center for Children in Poverty.  Bolen, M. G., McWey, L. M., & Schlee, B. M. (2008). Are at-risk parents getting what they need? Perspectives of parents involved with child protective services. Journal of Clinical Social Work, (36),  Goodyear, R. K., & Rubovits, J. J. (1982, March). Parent education: A model for low-income parents. The Personnel and Guidance Journal,  Harden, B. J. (2010, July). Home visitation with psychologically vulnerable families. Zero to Three,  Besser, R. E., Falk, H., & Hammond, R. W. (2009). Parent Training Programs: Insight For Practitioners. U.S. Dept. Health and Human Services, CDC.

17  House-Palmer, K., & Forest, C. (2003). Empowerment skills for family workers. Ithaca, New York: Cornell University Press.  Kerrigan, D. (2004, Spring). An introduction to integral social services. AQAL: The Journal of Integral Theory and Practice, 1(2),  Larkin, H. (2005, Summer). Social work as an integral profession. AQAL: The Journal of Integral Theory and Practice, 1(2),  National Resource Center for Foster Care and Permanency Planning, & National Resource Center for Family Centered Practice. (2002, July). Family centered assessment guidebook: The art of assessment. Retrieved from mily_centered_assessment_guidebook.pdf  University of California, Davis, Extension, & The Center for Human Services (Eds.). (2009, April). A strength-based approach to working with youth and families: A review of research.  Wilber, K. (2000). A theory of everything. Boston, Massachusetts: Shambhala.

18  All people and all families have strengths.  All families need and deserve support. How much and what kind of support varies throughout life.  Most successful families are not dependent on long-term public support. They maintain a healthy interdependence with extended family, friends, other people, spiritual organizations, cultural and community groups, schools and agencies, and the natural environment.  Diversity (race, ethnicity, gender, class, family form, religion, physical and mental ability, age, sexual orientation) is an important reality in our society, and is valuable. Family workers need to understand oppression in order to learn to work skillfully with families from all cultures.  The deficit approach, which requires families to show what is wrong in order to receive services, is counterproductive to helping families move toward self-reliance.  Changing from the deficit model to the family development approach requires a whole new way of thinking, not simply more new programs. Individual workers cannot make this shift without corresponding policy changes at agency, state, and federal levels. Core principles of family development (Forest, 2003) Family development is based on the following core principles:

19 Core principles of family development Continued  Families need coordinated services in which all the agencies they work with use a similar approach. Collaboration at the local, state, and federal levels is crucial to effective family development.  Families and family development workers are equally important partners in this process, with each contributing important knowledge. Workers learn as much as the families from the process.  Families must choose their own goals and methods of achieving them. Family development workers’ roles include helping families set reachable goals for their own self-reliance, providing access to services needed to reach these goals, and offering encouragement.  Services are provided so families can reach their goals, and are not themselves a measure of success. New methods of evaluating agency effectiveness are needed to measure family and community outcomes, not just the number of services provided.  For families to move out of dependency, helping systems must shift from a “power over” to a “shared power” paradigm. Human service workers have power (which they may not recognize) because they decide who gets valued resources. Workers can use that power to work with families rather than use power over them.

20 Child Abuse and Prevention

21 Parenting is an active, cognitive process. Accordingly, program designs that enable parents to digest and integrate new perspectives on parenting with existing beliefs and practices are likely to have greater effects than programs that approach parents as “blank slates” to be written upon with all new knowledge. by: Douglas Powell

22 Parent Education:  Help parents acquire and internalize parenting and problem-solving skills necessary to build a healthy family.  Effective parent training and family interventions promote protective factors and lead to positive outcomes for both parents and children  Protective factors include nurturing and attachment, knowledge of parenting and of child and youth development, parental resilience, social connections, and concrete supports for parents.

23 Some Risk Factors for Child Abuse and Neglect:  Factors Associated with Poverty  Unemployment  Low Level of Education  Annual Income of less than $15,  Closely Spaced Children  High Level of Conflict in Family  Unrealistic Expectations  Negative Attitude About Your Child(ren)  Teen Parent  Authoritarian (Dictator) Parenting Style  Substance Abuse  Low Self-Esteem, Depression, Anxiety or Mental Health  Use of Physical Punishment  Lack of Social Support System  High Level of Stress  History of Abuse as the Victim or Perpetrator

24 How Can Parent Education Programs Reduce the Risk Factors and Enhance Protective Factors?

25 Help Parents Improve Their Relationships with Their Children and Other People  Communication:  Praise & Encouragement  Active Listening  Tone of Voice  Clearly Stating Wants and Needs  Use of Body Language

26 Increase Parents’ Knowledge About Children  Awareness of Child Development:  Emotional Development  Physical Development  Cognitive Development  Understanding Your Child’s Disability

27 Teach Parents How to Manage Their Children Without Abusing Them  Understanding Why Children Misbehave:  How to Avoid Arguments with Your Children  How to Handle Temper Tantrums  What is Punishment / What is Discipline  Being Consistent  Targeted Child

28 Teach Parents How to Manage Stress  Life with Order and Structure  How to set up routines  Who are my support systems  How to access support in the community  What can school do for me

29 Give Parents a Chance to Practice Using What They Have Learned  Home Visitation  Work one-on-one with parent to address specific issues.  Demonstrate skills and techniques through roll playing.  Homework for parents to journal what they are doing.

30 Parent Education / Home Visitation Program 1. Parent’s Value System 2.Parenting Styles Home Visit 3.Communication 4.Child Development Home Visit 5.Self Worth / Self Esteem 6.Why Children Misbehave Home Visits 7.Rules, Routines, Boundaries 8.Using Behavior Charts & Chore Charts Home Visits 9.Mutual Respect 10.Review Home Visits

31 Types: Male & Female  Lawrence Kohlberg: Stages of Moral Development  Carol Gilligan: Stages of the Ethic of Care  “The difference between women and men which I describe center on a tendency for women and men to make different relational errors – for men to think that if they know themselves, following Socrates’ dictum, they will also know women, and for women to think if only they will know others, they will come to know themselves.” Carol Gilligan


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