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1 Ready, Set…Volunteer! Core Competencies Unit 3 Oklahoma 4-H Youth Development Parent-Volunteer Education.

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Presentation on theme: "1 Ready, Set…Volunteer! Core Competencies Unit 3 Oklahoma 4-H Youth Development Parent-Volunteer Education."— Presentation transcript:

1 1 Ready, Set…Volunteer! Core Competencies Unit 3 Oklahoma 4-H Youth Development Parent-Volunteer Education

2 2 Celebrating Diversity Core Competencies Unit 3 Oklahoma 4-H Youth Development Parent-Volunteer Education

3 3 Youth develop positive skills for being a capable and confident influence with their peers and in their communities, they learn to respect individuality and the contributions of various groups, they learn the importance of sharing their experiences which affirms their identity with regard to their own diversity, they build positive self-esteems, they learn to value just and fair treatment for all and they are better prepared for citizenship. Benefits of Diversity Education We could learn a lot from crayons: some are sharp, some are pretty, some are dull, some have weird names, and all are different colors…but, they all exist very nicely in the same box.

4 4 Emerged from the idea that customs and traditions of people of different races and ethnicities would blend and lose their one distinctions after close contact over time, just like ingredients mixed in a pot. Melting Pot Metaphor…

5 5 Salad Metaphor… Used to describe this blending of ethnic characteristics much like salad ingredients tossed in a bowl. Salad ingredients do not change even when they are mixed together.

6 6 Kaleidoscope Metaphor… When a kaleidoscope is in motions, new possibilities emerge at every turn, just like the interaction between cultural groups. This metaphor acknowledges that cultures keep changing through their interaction and yet maintain their basic characteristics.

7 7 Gender Age Race or Ethnicity Religion Physical/mental limitation Sexual orientation Membership in Organizations Many Faces, One People Building on Differences What are ways differences are defined?

8 8 More ways differences can be defined… Education Job/profession Income/financial status Hobby Geographic Marital/family status Many Faces, One People Building on Differences

9 9 Oklahoma State University, in compliance with Title VI and VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, Executive Order as amended, Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972, Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, and other federal laws and regulations, does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, national origin, sex, age, religion, disability, or status as a veteran in any of its policies, practices or procedures. This includes but is not limited to admissions, employment, financial aid, and educational service. Oklahoma State University Affirmative Action

10 10 Culture: A total way of life of a people, involving customs, beliefs, values, attitudes, communication patterns and interpretations of life. Many Faces, One People Definitions

11 11 Generalization: an oversimplification, conclusion or observation based on limited experience. Stereotype: belief that all people of a certain group will be the same and behave the same. Bias: failure to be objective and impartial about people or an issue. Prejudice: to judge without really knowing them, on the basis of the group they belong. Many Faces, One People Definitions

12 12 Discrimination: Unequal or unfair treatment of an individual or group because of race, religion, age, physical ability, gender, etc. Many Faces, One People Definitions

13 13 Prejudice is an attitude while discrimination is the action that results from it. When peoples act on the basis of their prejudice and stereotypes they are guilty of discrimination. Many Faces, One People Clarification

14 14 We could learn a lot from crayons: some are sharp, some are pretty, some are dull, some have weird names, and all are different colors…but, they all exist very nicely in the same box. Celebrate Our Diversity

15 15 Character Education Core Competencies Unit 3 Oklahoma 4-H Youth Development Parent-Volunteer Education

16 16 What is right is right even if no one is doing it. Character Education Building Character What is wrong is wrong even if everyone is doing it.

17 17 Character Education Strengthens the parenting role Improves the quality of life, and Develops a civil American society. By building character, we impact an individual’s development as well as families, schools, sports, and entire communities. Character Education Building Character

18 Josephson Institute survey of young people found: Almost ½ are thieves 70% cheat on exams 92% lie to their parents, and 91% are not satisfied with their own ethics Character Education Research Study

19 19 Character Education 6 Pillars of Character

20 20 Ask yourself the following questions: 1.Have I thought about the way my choices are likely to help or hurt others, the stakeholder? 2.Am I living up to the ethical principles of the “Six Pillars of Character” even if I have to give up things I want? 3.If I cannot find a way to live up to one of the six pillar principles without violating another, am I making the choice I think will be best for society in the long run? Character Education Making Ethical Choices

21 21 Be honest Don’t deceive, cheat, or steal. Be reliable – do what you say you’ll do. Have the courage to do the right thing. Build a good reputation. Be loyal – stand by your family, friends, and country. Character Education Trustworthiness

22 22 Treat others the way you want to be treated. Be tolerant of differences. Use good manners, not bad language. Be considerate of the feelings of others. Don’t threaten, hit, or hurt anyone. Deal peacefully with anger, insults, and disagreements. Character Education Respect

23 23 Do what you are supposed to do. Persevere; keep on trying! Always do your best. Be self-disciplined. Think before you act – consider the consequences. Be accountable for your choices. Character Education Responsibility

24 24 Play by the rules. Take turns and share. Be open-minded; listen to others. Don’t take advantage of others. Don’t blame others carelessly. Character Education Fairness

25 25 Be kind. Be compassionate and show you care. Express gratitude. Forgive others. Help people in need. Character Education Caring

26 26 Make your school and community better. Cooperate. Stay informed; vote. Be a good neighbor. Obey laws and rules and respect authority. Protect the environment. Character Education Citizenship

27 27 Ask yourself these questions when in the position to make an ethical choice: Have I thought about the way my choices are likely to help or hurt others? Am I living up to the ethical principles of the “Six Pillars of Character”, even if it means I have to give up things I want? If I cannot find a way to live up to one of the six pillar principles without violating another, am I making the choice I think will be the best for society in the long run? Character Education Making Ethical Choices

28 28 Experiential Learning Core Competencies Unit 3 Oklahoma 4-H Youth Development Parent-Volunteer Education

29 29 4-H is… Experiential Learning “Learn by Doing”

30 30 The Experiential Learning Model Five Step Process A learning/teaching process is composed of 5 separate but interrelated steps. The process begins with an individual or group learning exercise and ends with discussion of how what was learned can be applied to other settings in the “real world.” 1. The Activity 2. Sharing observances, feelings, experiences from the activity 3. Patterns Noticed 4. Ways these facts, skills, patterns, reactions or principles relate to real life situations 5. Plan of Action for using the new information or skill

31 31 Do ReflectApply SharingProcessingGeneralizingApplying Doing, Reflecting and Applying Experiencing

32 32 H Key concept is planning for discovery.  Selecting a single learning activity provides a common experience.  Objective – to explore and examine. H Key concept is responding.  Plan time for discovery of learning objectives.  Opportunity to respond.  Share individual learning to stimulate group growth H Key concept is analyzing patterns.  Examine the shared experience.  Ask questions that encourage them to think about the experience from the lowest to the highest level of thought. H Key Question, “So what?”  Guide from the reality of the activity to a meaning in a broader world.  Apply to personal life experiences. H Key question, “Now what?”  Think about what can be done with the new information.  Apply to specific situations.  Have in mind ways an individual/group can use experience in future activities. Step 5 Applying (Planning more effective behavior) Step 4 Generalizing (Inferring principles about the “real world”) Step 3 Processing (Discussing pattern dynamics) Step 2 Sharing (Sharing reactions and observations) Step 1 Experiencing (Activity, doing) Teaching as a Volunteer Experiential Learning

33 33 “Learning takes place in an active way and is accomplished through the individual’s own activity.” - Randal Doing, Reflecting and Applying

34 34 Isn’t mere information- giving Isn’t mere entertaining Is creating a learning environment Is structuring learning experiences Is helping the learning interact with information TIP It is not possible to teach anyone, anything. It is only possible to arrange for someone to learn. The Trainers Role

35 35 Hearing Seeing Doing Hearing Seeing Hearing 20% 50% 80-90% TIP People generally remember: 10% of what they read 20% of what they hear 30% of what they see 50% of what they hear and see 80-90% of what they do Keys to Successful Teaching Learning Retention Edgar Dale, 1969

36 36 What You Hear 20% amount retained Amount forgotten What You Hear and See 50% amount retained Amount forgotten What You Hear, See and Do Amount forgotten 80-90% amount retained Keys to Successful Teaching Learning Retention

37 37 4-H Project Work Working with models Judging or Skit Discussion Demonstration Field trip – Tour Exhibits – Displays TV, Video tape, Internet Radio, tapes, pictures Illustrated Talks, Posters, Graphs, Charts,Maps Talks, Printed material Prepare a meal Prepare menu with food models Food Judging Event World Hunger Discussion Demo.-Vegetable Lasagna Tour Test Kitchen Tour exhibits at Nutrition Conference Watch video tape “You Are What You Eat” Cassette tape “Eating Fruits and Vegetables” Poster of Food Pyramid Read Southern Living Magazine 20 % % 50 % Applying the cone to Food Science.

38 38 4-H Project Work Working with models Judging or Skit Discussion Demonstration Field trip – Tour Exhibits – Displays TV, Video tape, Internet Radio, tapes/CD, pictures Illustrated Talks, Posters Talks, Printed material Plant, harvest and prepare produce Computer generated garden plan Horticulture Judging Event World Hunger Discussion Demo. – Window Herb Garden Tour Home and Garden Show Tree Leaf Exhibit Oklahoma Gardening -“Planting Spring Vegetables” CD - “Eating Fruits and Vegetables” Ill. Talk – “Eat Your 5 a-day” Read Southern Living Magazine 20 % % 50 % Applying the cone to Horticulture.

39 39 A skill is a learned ability to do something well. Life Skills are the way one applies learned skills to real life situations. Oklahoma 4-H Skills vs. Life Skills

40 40 Life Skills Taught through Food Science and Horticulture

41 41 SkillLife SkillApplication to Real Life Reading a recipe or mixing chemicals Learning to Learn Following directions – from a “put-together” to employer instructions on the job Schedule for planting and harvest or meal preparation Planning and Organization Coordinating school, work & 4-H activities; job manager/supervisor; parenting Growing, preparing, and eating fruits and vegetables Healthy Lifestyle Choices and Self- responsibility Good nutrition, improved health, source of exercise, caring for others or things which are reliant on you Food preservation or use of power equipment Responsible Citizen and Teamwork Safe food source, decrease injury due to negligence or carelessness Working side-by-side with a mentor, listening, watching and learning - Sharing what you learn Cooperation, Nurturing Relationships, Communication Respect for experience and gaining knowledge; active listening as a spouse or employee; speaking/communicating instructions or information

42 42 Life skills are to be integrated into subject matter content; not “added-on.” Life skills are best learned when practiced at the developmental level of the learner. One or more skills should be included in any one educational experience. “Aim youth toward life skills development using the four H’s on the Target Model.” Oklahoma 4-H Effective use of Life Skills

43 43 Experiential Learning Model Service Learning

44 44 Service-Learning is a teaching/learning method that connects meaningful community service with academic learning, personal growth, and civic responsibility. Experiential Learning Model Service Learning

45 45 Service-Learning provides opportunity to use new skills and knowledge in real life situations. Experiential Learning Model Service Learning

46 46 Service- Learning emphasizes both volunteering and learning. Community Service Vs. Service Learning Community Service is the act of volunteering in your community.

47 47 Preparation Action Reflection Celebration Service Learning Framework

48 48 Identifying and analyzing a problem Selecting and planning the project Training and orientation for participants Service Learning Framework Preparation

49 49 Is meaningful Has academic integrity Has adequate supervision Provides for student ownership Is developmentally appropriate Service Learning Framework Action

50 50 Discussion Reading Writing Projects The Arts Service Learning Framework Reflection

51 51 Banquet/party/picnic End of the year celebration Certificates Joint celebration with service recipients Service Learning Framework Celebration

52 52 Preparation Action Reflection Celebration Service Learning in Action

53 53 High Academic Performance Leadership Development Heightened Sense of Purpose Intellectual Growth Social and Personal Growth Development of Sense of Citizenship Increased Interest in Learning & 4-H Acceptance and Awareness of Others from Diverse and Cultural Backgrounds Benefits of Service Learning

54 54 Personal Growth Social Growth Intellectual Growth Civic Responsibility Career Exploration Experiential Learning and Service Learning Models Benefits to 4-H’er

55 55 Experiential Learning Model Service Learning

56 56 Youth-Adult Partnerships Core Competencies Unit 3 Oklahoma 4-H Youth Development Parent-Volunteer Education

57 57 Brainstorm youth perception of adults Brainstorm adult perception of youth Brainstorm benefits of working with adults Brainstorm challenges of working with adults How do you communicate effectively with adults? Youth-Adult Partnerships Small Group Project

58 58 Adults are strict. Adults talk down to youth. Adults can’t remember what it is like to be a young person. Adults don’t respect youth’s ideas. Adults can’t confide in youth. Adults don’t listen. Adults have no time for youth. From the Washington Youth Voice Project. Youth-Adult Partnerships Stereotypes Youth have of Adults

59 59 Youth are lazy, apathetic – they only want to play. Youth are a burden on society. Youth lie. Youth can’t take responsibility. Youth are rude. Youth can’t make commitments. Youth never do anything. From the Washington Youth Voice Project. Youth-Adult Partnerships Stereotypes Adults have of Youth

60 60 When youth are angry or disturbed and won’t tell you they are upset. When youth stall, put off doing work, or generally act lazy. Young people getting easily distracted and changing course, not being able to commit to one course of action. Youth-Adult Partnerships Things that Bother Adults

61 61 Youth refusing to hear or listen to adult experience. Interrupting or being disruptive in a group by snide comments. Youth-Adult Partnerships Things that Bother Adults continued

62 62 When adults put on a superior or condescending attitude. When adults convey that they know youth are irresponsible, rude, inconsiderate. When adults forget how they felt when they were young, and are insensitive to teenagers. Youth-Adult Partnerships Things that Bother Youth

63 63 When adults try to psychoanalyze youth. When adults order or assign youth to do only small tasks. When adults patronize, like praising youth just for showing up. When adults try to be “cool” or act like youth. Youth-Adult Partnerships Things that Bother Youth continued

64 64 Criticism (from adults) does not necessarily equate to scorn. Adults may not be aware of how capable you are. Adults will feel responsible for the success or failure of the project, so it is sometimes hard for them to share authority over it. Adults are just as uncertain as young people, they have just learned to disguise it. From Loring Leifer and Michael McLarney, Younger Voices, Stronger Choices Youth-Adult Partnerships Youth, keep this in mind…

65 65 Check your expectations before starting a project—what do you expect from it? Ask for information about the project: How would you fit into the process? What are your roles and responsibilities? Develop your skills so that you feel comfortable participating. Make an effort to really listen. Respect the views and experience of others. Be truthful!! Youth-Adult Partnerships Do’s for Working with Adults

66 66 Don’t hesitate to ask questions. Don’t hesitate to be creative, energetic, and enthusiastic. Don’t assume all adults will treat you like your parents treat you. Don’t over commit yourself! Youth-Adult Partnerships Don’t for Working with Adults

67 67 Treat us with respect, please don’t humiliate us publicly, please don’t talk down to us. If invited to be a part of an organization, we’d like to be as fully involved as adult members. Know that we are capable and can do most things adults can do. We are willing to be involved and can commit time and energy to the project and/or organization. Youth-Adult Partnerships Advice to Adults from Youth

68 68 Welcome us to meetings by doing such things as offering us a seat. Invite questions and answer willingly so that we can feel comfortable to ask about things we do not understand. Please help us if we need help. (but ask first) From the Washington Youth Voice Project. Youth-Adult Partnerships Advice to Adults from Youth continued

69 69 Be on time. Come prepared to participate– read any notes, meetings, or other information before meetings, note any questions about your role, and learn more about the organization or project. Focus on the purpose during the meeting and activities. Youth-Adult Partnerships Advice to Youth from Adults

70 70 Take your role and commitments seriously. Listen a lot at first to get a sense of how the group/organization functions and explore ways that you can best contribute. Don’t expect to understand all that you hear—but make sure to ask questions! Youth-Adult Partnerships Advice to Youth from Adults continued

71 71 Have understanding Plan together Counsel often Evaluate progress Youth-Adult Partnerships How Teens can help Adult Volunteers

72 72 Primary Experience – taking care of your own project(s) Secondary Experience – teaching others Advanced Experience – being completely in charge and responsible Youth-Adult Partnerships Progression of Leadership

73 73 EnablerAutocrat Nice GuyLaissez-faire LowHigh Low High Relationships Task Accomplishment Team-work Regimentation Good times Chaos Effective Leadership Leadership Styles of the Team Leader Red Taxi

74 74 Characteristics:Releasable Authority: How UsedWhen Most Effective After identifying guidelines & boundaries, leader turns situation to a subordinate. About 25% with the leader. Leader identifies problems, sets guidelines and boundaries. With the cooperative individual or group. Decisions are made by group or individual. Up to 75% with the individual or group. Leader must resist getting in subordinate’s way while he does it. With group minded individuals. Decisions will be accepted by Leader if they fall within the guidelines. Up to 100% with the individual or group. Leader tries to build cooperation & team spirit. With cooperative and group minded individuals and groups. Effective Leadership Leadership Styles

75 75 Fear. Lack of time. Wrong ideas about delegation (justification). Lack of acceptance of authority and responsibility by the person delegated to. Expectations of others. Lack of skill (not understanding how). Effective Leadership Why a Team Leader Doesn’t Delegate

76 76 To get results. To give someone else growth opportunities. To develop self-motivation in others. To have opportunity for different or more important responsibilities. To share decision-making authority. Because the leader lacks time. Because the leader lacks skills. Effective Leadership Why a Team Leader Delegates

77 77 The best executive is the one who has sense enough to pick good men/women to do what he/she wants done and self- restraint enough to keep from meddling with them while they do it.” Theodore Roosevelt Effective Leadership The Art of Delegation


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