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© BRITISH NUTRITION FOUNDATION 2012 Case study – part 1 Dairy farming.

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Presentation on theme: "© BRITISH NUTRITION FOUNDATION 2012 Case study – part 1 Dairy farming."— Presentation transcript:

1 © BRITISH NUTRITION FOUNDATION 2012 Case study – part 1 Dairy farming

2 © BRITISH NUTRITION FOUNDATION 2012 Leaning objectives To recognise that the farmer considers the health and welfare of the dairy cows during different aspects of farming.

3 © BRITISH NUTRITION FOUNDATION 2012 Dairy farming in the UK The population of the UK drinks around five billion litres of milk each year, the equivalent of 2,000 Olympic sized swimming pools. This is an average of 1.6 litres of milk each week. In addition, seven billion litres of milk is used in the production of dairy products such as cheese, butter, yogurt and dried milk powder.

4 © BRITISH NUTRITION FOUNDATION 2012 Case study For three generations a family have farmed dairy cows and produced Cheddar Cheese in the West country. On this farm, each cow produces about 7,000 litres of milk per year, which in total supplies the cheese dairy with just over 7 million litres of fresh milk to be made into traditional farmhouse cheese. This volume of milk equates to an annual cheese production of 6,000 tonnes. Find our more …

5 © BRITISH NUTRITION FOUNDATION 2012 Life cycle on a dairy farm The production of milk requires dairy cows to be in lactation, producing milk, to do this she must have given birth to a calf. The cycle of calving, lactation, insemination and pregnancy, then a ‘dry’ period, tends to work in 12 month cycles. The ‘dry’ period is similar to an adult going on maternity leave, where the cow will rest and prepare for the birth of her calf. Dairy farms are reliant on the production of calves for the production of milk.

6 © BRITISH NUTRITION FOUNDATION 2012 Cow housing Like most dairy farms across the UK, the cows on this farm graze outdoors during the summer and are housed during the winter. This farm uses a cow shed with a free stalls system, with individual beds for each cow. Elastic stall segregation is used to prevent cows from harming themselves. The cows are able to rest, stand and move around freely. Find our more …

7 © BRITISH NUTRITION FOUNDATION 2012 Dairy farming in the UK Herd health checks are carried out regularly and the farmer works closely with a veterinarian and animal nutritionist to ensure the highest quality of health and welfare for the dairy cows. Each dairy cow also has an animal passport identifying the origin of the cow and any other locations it has been transported to.

8 © BRITISH NUTRITION FOUNDATION 2012 Cow milking The cows come in from the fields or the barn into the collecting yard twice a day. From the yard a number of cows are taken into the ‘herringbone style’ milking parlour. Find our more …

9 © BRITISH NUTRITION FOUNDATION 2012 Milking The herdsman or farmer firstly uses a clean paper towel is to wipe each udder. Foremilk is stripped. This is where a little bit of milk is squeezed from each teat to ensure the milk looks clean and healthy. One cup (flexible rubber) is applied to each teat from the cluster. The vacuum draws the milk from the udder, in a similar fashion as a baby calf's mouth massaging the teat.

10 © BRITISH NUTRITION FOUNDATION 2012 Milking To prevent over milking the cluster automatically detaches itself. The udders are checked by hand to ensure the cow has been milked out properly. Antibacterial spray is applied to each teat to prevent infection, such as mastitis, and keep the skin healthy. Once the cows in that row have been milked, they are let out of the parlour. The cows are free to move around, sit down, eat and drink.

11 © BRITISH NUTRITION FOUNDATION 2012 Milk storage The lift pump draws the milk through large diameter stainless steel piping into the dairy. The milk passes through a plate heat exchanger to reduce the temperature of the milk to between 1-4 ºC before being stored in a refrigerated bulk tank.

12 © BRITISH NUTRITION FOUNDATION 2012 Transport A milk tanker calls at the farm daily or every other day to collect the milk. The driver checks the temperature of the milk before transporting it to the processing dairy. This farm will process the milk to produce cheese in a factory on the farm. Other farms will transport the milk to a processing dairy further away.

13 © BRITISH NUTRITION FOUNDATION 2012 Quiz Take the quiz. Take the quizEnd

14 © BRITISH NUTRITION FOUNDATION 2012 Question 1 True or false? For a cow to produce milk, she must first give birth to a calf. A. True B. False

15 © BRITISH NUTRITION FOUNDATION 2012 Question 1 Correct – well done! Next question

16 © BRITISH NUTRITION FOUNDATION 2012 Question 1 Sorry, that is not correct. Try againNext question

17 © BRITISH NUTRITION FOUNDATION 2012 Question 2 Which information is NOT shown on a dairy cow passport? A. The identity of the cow’s mother. B. The location and the date of birth. C. Any other location the cow may have travelled. D. An approved farm visa for the cow.

18 © BRITISH NUTRITION FOUNDATION 2012 Question 2 Correct – well done! Next question

19 © BRITISH NUTRITION FOUNDATION 2012 Question 2 Sorry, that is not correct. Try againNext question

20 © BRITISH NUTRITION FOUNDATION 2012 Question 3 What are the key features of the cow sheds? A. Well ventilated B. Allows cows to be sociable C. Free access to food and water D. All of the above

21 © BRITISH NUTRITION FOUNDATION 2012 Question 3 Correct – well done! Next question

22 © BRITISH NUTRITION FOUNDATION 2012 Question 3 Sorry, that is not correct. Try againNext question

23 © BRITISH NUTRITION FOUNDATION 2012 Question 4 Which one of the following is NOT a stage of the milking process? A. The foremilk is stripped from the teats. B. A bucket collects the milk leaking from the teat. C. Spraying the teat with antibacterial spray. D. Cups from the cluster are placed onto each teat.

24 © BRITISH NUTRITION FOUNDATION 2012 Question 4 Correct – well done! Next question

25 © BRITISH NUTRITION FOUNDATION 2012 Question 4 Sorry, that is not correct. Try againNext question

26 © BRITISH NUTRITION FOUNDATION 2012 Question 5 What does the milk tank driver check before he takes the milk from the farm to a processing dairy? A. The fat content of the milk. B. The number of cows in the herd. C. The diet and nutrition of the cows. D. The temperature of the milk.

27 © BRITISH NUTRITION FOUNDATION 2012 Question 5 Correct – well done! End

28 © BRITISH NUTRITION FOUNDATION 2012 Question 5 Sorry, that is not correct. Try againEnd

29 © BRITISH NUTRITION FOUNDATION 2012 British Nutrition Foundation High Holborn House High Holborn London WC1V 6RQ Telephone: Fax: Web :


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