Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Cultural Connection African Diaspora Presenter Demetrius Brown Sr. Youth Development Associate Professor University of Wisconsin-Extension.

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "Cultural Connection African Diaspora Presenter Demetrius Brown Sr. Youth Development Associate Professor University of Wisconsin-Extension."— Presentation transcript:

1 Cultural Connection African Diaspora Presenter Demetrius Brown Sr. Youth Development Associate Professor University of Wisconsin-Extension

2 “To Be African or Not to Be? Students taking the challenge to make things go right for themselves their family, and their community”

3 Culture Sum total of ways of living, including: –Values –Beliefs –Aesthetic standards –Linguistic expression –Patterns of thinking –Behavioral norms –Styles of communication (Visions Inc. 2000)

4 Culture For African Americans and “other culture” takes on the added dimension of established guidelines for interacting with a society which does not value either their ethnicity, their history and heritage, or their language. Shade (1974)

5 CULTUAL CONCERNS Historically, Africa has often served as a prime target for Western experimentation, intervention and exploitation. Early missionaries saw the people of Africa as in need of redemption, devoid of civilization and religious faith.

6 Racial Oppression “Race” A color prejudice associated with organized hegemony or domination A social construct that divide humans into varies degrees, distinguished by physical traits (skin color, hair type, body shape…) The concept of “race” is the product of Europe’s colonization of Africa and other parts of the world

7 Naming Process Colored Negro Black African American African Preoccupied with aspects of our phenotype, mainly our skin color, hair texture and facial features.

8 African Descriptions Minority Disadvantaged Inner-city At-risk Culturally deprived Culturally disadvantaged Identities that detach Africans from time, space and the flow of human history…

9 “Mainstream” Western Culture Emplasizes: –The role of the individual rather than the collective –The idea that nature must be controlled and harness for man’s advantage –The ultimate successful personality as one which is self reliant, industrious, thrifty, highly motivated, and competitive. (McClelland and Mason 1961)

10 Culture in Education THE PRIMARY VICTIMS OF BIASED EDUCATION ARE THOSE WHO ARE INVISIBLE IN THE CURRICULUM. PERSONS OF COLOR, WOMEN, AND POOR, WORKING CLASS ALL ARE ABSENT FROM THE CURRICULUM. 10

11 Multicultural Education Some say that the primary objective of multicultural education is to address the needs of students who historically had been most neglected and mis-educated by the schools.

12 STUDENT’S SAY Twenty-three percent more Black youth than Whites believe that Black youth receive a poorer education on average than do White youth

13 Research Says Orfield (2004) report states that graduation discrepancy rates between Whites and Blacks in Wisconsin is 43 percent, the highest discrepancy in the country. According to the Civic Report (2002), Wisconsin had the lowest graduation rate in the country among African-American public school students, with only 41 percent graduating in 2000.

14 Statistics Say Black youth constitute 6 percent of the population, 10 percent of homicide victims, and 18 percent of homicide offenders. Twenty percent of Black youth 18 years and older had not completed high school. Black youth ages 16 to 19 suffered an unemployment rate of 30 percent. Twenty-one of one thousand Black males are in US prisons. According to US census bureau 2006, US Department of Labor 2005 and Department of Justice 2003

15 History Slavery Colonization Apartheid Have all made a contribute to African American culture and the education process.

16 African Survival The development of separate communities both in the slave quarters and in cities and the need to join forces against the color- caste system, provided the impetus and the opportunity for remnants of the African culture and education to take place. (Shade 1980)

17 Remnants of African Culture Musical Rhythms / Scales Art Instruments / Dances Folk tales / Story Telling Myths Riddles and Rhymes Religion (Nobles, 1980)

18 The Intent of the Program Multicultural Education Is a structured process designed to foster understanding, acceptance, and constructive relations among students of many difference cultures. (Visions Inc. 2000)

19 The African Diaspora Project TO PROVIDE AN EDUCATIONAL OPPORTUNITY FOR STUDENTS TO LEARN AFRICAN CULTURE, AND HISTORY IN ORDER TO FOSTER AN AWARENESS AND JUDGEMENT OF ONE’S HERITAGE

20 Program Objectives To learn perceptions that shape and structure the realities of African American culture. To develop a worldview and an interest in educational achievement, career exploration and family origin. To motivate participants to accept themselves, become self-determined, and creative leaders of their environment

21 Project Description: Phase I Self-knowledge –Who am I? –What are the meaning of names / descriptions? Life Cycles –7 life stages –Support Re-Awakening –Cultural Games –Study

22 Circular Process Afro centric Ideology

23 African Vs Western Africans conceptual system is holistic and assumes the unity of spirit and matter, their oneness. (Afro centric World View) VS Western conceptual system is fragmented and assumes that Tran physical and physical, or spirit and matter are separate. (Western World View)

24 On Common Ground Problem Solving / Adversarial Recognizes common interest Seeks to meet needs Separates people from problem Values relationships Guarded Uses emotional pressure Makes high initial demands Conceals information

25 Education in Action

26 Acknowledgement

27 Program Topics Literature Language Geography Economics/Natural Resources Art/Music Health Cuisine (FOODS)

28 Study and Research

29 African Scholar of Health

30 Project Description: Phase II African “Worldview” Problem Solving / Adversarial Conflict Resolution and Negotiation Skills International Careers

31 Project Description: Phase III Leadership Activities –Model United Nation –Model African Unity Research Skills –Career Exploration –Cultural Grams

32 African Union Research Team

33 PROGRAM BARRIES THE PROGRAM IS CONSIDERED A SPECIALTY TEACHERS DON’T HAVE TO INCLUDE IT IN THEIR CURRICULUM. SCHOOL SPECIALTY HAVE LIMITED TIME BEHAVIOR, ATTENDENT AND PARTICPATION CAN BE SPARATIC.

34 Students Statements “ I found out more about my heritage and what goes on in Africa and other places on the African continent” “Participating in African music, dance and spoken word has helped me relate better to our culture, which now I want to study more about it” “The problem solving project…give me a better idea of what I could change and what would make a difference…”

35 continue “ I learned more about my heritage, more about diseases and poverty that affects our community” I learned about the good things in Africa; first human being…, natural resources… and the unity among the people” “I think I’m going into journalism; so I can write stories to help Americans think about all the issues that happens in Africa…”

36 AU Negotiation in Action

37 Project Description: Phase IV Model Organization of African Unity Simulation Conference Evaluation Documentation and Publication

38 African Union Conference

39 Accomplishments of African Diaspora Project One hundred and ninety-Five Students have participated the African Diaspora Project Seventy-five students have participated in and an Model African Unity and Model United Nations Conferences

40 Response from School Partner “ The principal said: “students from the project were exhibiting leadership qualities and have taken on new roles within the school community”

41 Model African Union in Action

42 OAU Research in Action

43 Special Thanks: Wisconsin-Cooperative Extension Service Milwaukee Public Schools The Wisconsin Humanities Council The Milwaukee Foundation University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee- Continuing Education African Scholar/Mentors/Educators


Download ppt "Cultural Connection African Diaspora Presenter Demetrius Brown Sr. Youth Development Associate Professor University of Wisconsin-Extension."

Similar presentations


Ads by Google