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REALLY Inquiry: How much do you REALLY know? A Quick Question and Answer Resource Created by Tracy Nail May 2009.

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Presentation on theme: "REALLY Inquiry: How much do you REALLY know? A Quick Question and Answer Resource Created by Tracy Nail May 2009."— Presentation transcript:

1 REALLY Inquiry: How much do you REALLY know? A Quick Question and Answer Resource Created by Tracy Nail May 2009

2 Common Inquiry Topics What is Inquiry? Types of Questions Science Notebooks Science Trade Books Inquiry and Literacy What is Inquiry? Types of Questions Science Notebooks Science Trade Books Inquiry and Literacy Three “legs” of Inquiry Science Workshop Exploration vs. Investigation Importance of Discussion and Reflection Assessment Click on the pencil in front of the topic to view information about that topic Use this button to return to this page. Resources

3 What is Inquiry? Inquiry is a method of teaching that allows students to explore answers to their own questions. It can be hands-on or research based. The focus of inquiry is to have students make meaning of the “big ideas” in the curriculum and come to understand the material more deeply. Click the light bulb to read other educators’ statements about Inquiry

4 What kinds of questions can be used for inquiry? When inquiry is being used, students should be encouraged to ask two different types of questions. Research questions and testable questions. Research Questions - Click Here Testable Questions - Click Here

5 What is a Science Notebook? A science notebook is a tool for inquiry. It allows students to keep their ideas, procedures, results, and reflections in one place. Keeping a science notebook is similar to the way REAL scientists work and provides an authentic tool for having students reading and writing in science. Click the light bulb to see types of notebook entries

6 Why are Science Trade Books used in inquiry? Teachers and students are encouraged to use science trade books when doing inquiry to help them find answers to questions that may not be testable within the classroom or may be too large to answer through an experiment. Scientists often rely on the work of others to influence and guide their work. By using science trade books, students are using information that has been studied and confirmed by other scientists. Click on the book to be taken to the NSTA list of recommended science trade books.

7 How does inquiry teaching support literacy? Inquiry gives students the opportunity to write, read, and think like a scientist. When inquiry is accompanied by the use of science notebooks and meaningful classroom discussions and reflection, students have an authentic learning experience. Click here to read quotes about science and literacy

8 What are the “three legs” of inquiry? Students’ Ability Students’ Understanding Set of Teaching Methods the Teacher Can Use Click on the stool to find out more about each “leg” From: Tools & Traits for Highly Effective Science Teaching, K-8 by JoAnne Vasquez (2008)Tools & Traits for Highly Effective Science Teaching, K-8 by JoAnne Vasquez (2008)

9 How can a Science Workshop facilitate inquiry teaching? From: Science Workshop: Reading, Writing, and Thinking Like a ScientistScience Workshop: Reading, Writing, and Thinking Like a Scientist by Wendy Saul (2002) “Science Workshop captures the essence of scientific inquiry” Click here to review components of a science workshop Science workshop borrows from the structure of the reading/writing workshop by Fountas and Pinnel. Mini-lessons, writing, and exploring are all part of the science workshop.

10 What is the difference between exploration and investigation? EXPLORATION Engaged wandering and wondering through materials and ideas Free to select materials and manner of exploration INVESTIGATION Focused pursuit in response to a question, curiosity, or problem Provide a process to use Refer to Science Workshop for more informationScience Workshop

11 Why is discussion and reflection necessary in inquiry? Discussion and reflection are critical components of inquiry learning. Students need to make meaning from what they are discovering through their investigations. If discussion and reflection are not used, students may continue to harbor misconceptions about the science concept being explored. Click here for guidelines to use with science notebooks

12 How are students assessed when using inquiry? When students are learning through inquiry, much of the assessment much be done through anecdotal records, review of the science notebook, and through projects that demonstrate the science concept. Teachers who use inquiry develop rubrics, checklists and notebooks to record their observations of students as they are working.

13 Educator Quotes from the Inquiry Institute Website Marilyn Austin, Teacher-in-Residence, Exploratorium, San Francisco CA Inquiry as I understand it, is a process of exploration which is guided by a personal interest or question. It involves risk taking and experimenting which can lead to pathways where the learner may discover meaningful concepts and understandings. The step on which I am most focused currently, is considering how valuable student's questions are to their own inquiry. Students have an increased ownership of the process of inquiry if they are motivated by their own questions. Doris Ash, Science Educator, Exploratorium, San Francisco CA Philosophically, I find inquiry a wonderful metaphor for life. Interacting with phenomena in open-ended ways, following individualized learning paths and noticing everything that occurs, especially the oddities, is a fitting way to go through one's days whether practicing science, the arts, or life. Bronwyn Bevan, Asst. Director, Center for Teaching & Learning, Exploratorium, San Francisco CA Inquiry is a mode of teaching and learning that is about questioning, hypothesizing, and discovering. I believe it is about a shift in attitude rather than an upheaval in curriculum and classroom. Cappy Greene, Science Educator, Exploratorium, San Francisco CA An inquiry approach to teaching stimulates curiosity by teaching children how to observe very closely, encourages children to take more than one quick look, provides adequate materials for exploration, and makes it safe for students to ask questions and to take risks. It helps them to make connections to events in their own lives, and gives them ownership of their own learning. Go Back

14 Science Notebook Entries Go Back

15 Research Questions From Nurturing Inquiry by Charles Pearce “Read to Find Out” Most often asked in school Require students to use secondary sources (books, computer) Sources other than the student need to be used Example: “How hot is the surface of the sun?” Go Back

16 Testable Questions From Nurturing Inquiry by Charles Pearce Students can answer on their own Use direct observation Experiment and manipulate variables Students design an experiment Example: “Which evaporates faster, hot water or cold water?” Go Back

17 Science and Literacy “Writing is an instrument for thinking.” Scaffolding Science Inquiry Through Lesson Design, Klentschy and Thompson (2008) “By reading and then reporting on what other scientists have discovered, children become familiar with the topic. This experience is crucial” Nurturing Inquiry, Pearce (1999) “[Writing] is essential to [students’] inquiry. It is the writing that ties all the pieces together.” Science Workshop, Reardon (2002) “Combine the doing of science with the reading about the subject. [As we read], we formulate our hands- on exploration. Science Workshop, Dieckman (2002) Go Back

18 Leg #1: Students’ ABILITY to do Scientific Inquiry Student can: Ask questions Plan and conduct simple investigations Use equipment Communicate results Modify explanations “Doing Science” From: Tools & Traits for Highly Effective Science Teaching, K-8 by JoAnne Vasquez (2008) Go Back

19 Leg #2: Students’ UNDERSTANDING of Scientific Inquiry Student understands how and why scientific knowledge changes in response to New evidence Logical analysis Students identify the true nature of science as an Evolving Body of Knowledge Modified explanations debated within a community of scientists Example: Debate about Pluto Leg #1 and Leg #2 combined fosters Science Literacy From: Tools & Traits for Highly Effective Science Teaching, K-8 by JoAnne Vasquez (2008) Go Back

20 Leg #3: Inquiry as a set of TEACHING METHODS the teachers can use Guide teachers as they plan lessons - Demonstrated by Set up of investigations How access to science content is provided How to probe student thinking (ask questions) Adaptation of curriculum to meet interests, knowledge, understanding and experience Inquiry is NOT the ONLY way to teach. From: Tools & Traits for Highly Effective Science Teaching, K-8 by JoAnne Vasquez (2008) Go Back

21 Science Workshop Go Back Dedicated block of time (90 Minutes preferred), two to three times per week Mini-lessons focused on science skills Investigation and exploration time Written reflection (in science notebooks) Class “Scientists” Meeting - Discussion about results of the investigations and explorations Re-read and add to notebook reflection From Science Workshop: Reading, Writing, and Thinking Like a Scientist, Chapter by Jeanne Reardon

22 Science Notebook Guidelines with Reflection Go Back

23 Resources Nurturing Inquiry: Real Science for the Elementary Classroom by Charles Pearce © 1999 Heinemann Science Workshop: Reading, Writing, and Thinking Like a Scientist by Wendy Saul © 2002 Heinemann Science Notebooks: Writing About Inquiry by Brian Campbell and Lori Fulton © 2003 Heinemann Scaffolding Science Inquiry Through Lesson Design by Michael Klentschy and Laurie Thompson © 2008 Heinemann Tools & Traits for Highly Effective Science Teaching, K-8 by Jo Anne Vasquez © 2008 Heinemann Go Back


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