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Energy Management: Part I Uichin Lee KAIST KSE. Mobile Processing Power – Changing the Mobile Device From

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Presentation on theme: "Energy Management: Part I Uichin Lee KAIST KSE. Mobile Processing Power – Changing the Mobile Device From"— Presentation transcript:

1 Energy Management: Part I Uichin Lee KAIST KSE

2 Mobile Processing Power – Changing the Mobile Device From

3 Chipset Business Evolving to System Business Integration is key to driving advanced functionality to mass market From

4 Creating New Mobile, Computing and CE Device Categories From

5 But Major Gaps Exist

6 Battery Technology is Falling Behind How do we balance battery life with performance and cost?

7 Marc A. Viredaz, Lawrence S. Brakmo, William R. Hamburgen HP Labs ACM Queue Oct Energy Management on Handheld Devices

8 Itsy Platform Itsy goals (YR 2000): – Small, powerful, flexible h/w platform – Flexible, extensible, advanced s/w environment Base system – StrongArm SA-1100 microprocessor – 32MB DRAM & Flash Drive – LCD display and touch screen Passive matrix gray scale – Li-ion battery (charges from USB) – 2-axis accelerometer – Microphone – Jacks (headset, docking) – Daughtercard connecter Software – Linux w/ modified memory/flash-based file systems – Power management capability

9 Ohm’s law, Power, Energy Ohm’s law: V=IR (=current*resistance) Power: watt (W) = 1 joule/second (J/s) – Power (W) = VI= I 2 R Energy: (Ws, or Joule) – Energy (Ws) = power (w) * time (s) I=V/R? 2.2Ω9v Voltage drop = 16v 2kΩ I=V/R?

10 Power Measurement Voltages are directly measured. Currents are calculated from the corresponding sense-resistor voltage drop. Elementary power domains are delimited by dashed lines.

11 Power Consumption

12 Energy Saving Techniques Simple approach: if a unit is not used, turn off or put into sleep mode But requires well structured h/w and s/w design Inter-connected building blocks must independently function and be independently powered on/off Operating systems (or applications) utilize measured power values to balance performance and battery life Major power draws: processor, memory, display, audio system, wireless networking

13 Processor StrongARM SA-1100

14 Processor Frequency or/and voltage scaling: Power ∝ f·v 2 – f: operating frequency, v: voltage J.Pouwelse, K.Langendoen, and H. Sips, “Dynamic Voltage Scaling on a Low-Power Microprocessor”, MOBICOM2001 Voltage Scaling in Strong Arm SA Mhz at 0.79v  251Mhz at 1.65v

15 Processor: How to Scale? How to scale voltage/frequency?... power time Watts Low frequencyHigh frequency ? Critical Power Slope: Understanding the Runtime Effects of Frequency Scaling, ICS2002

16 Processor: Critical Power Slope Frequency Power : energy efficient to run at lower freq : energy efficient to run at higher freq f min : min operating frequency P fmin : power consumption at freq f min P idle : idle power consumption Critical Power Slope: Understanding the Runtime Effects of Frequency Scaling, ICS2002

17 Memory DRAM typically has four states: – Activate/pre-charge: read/write happen (most energy consuming) – Fast lower-power: short-term sleeping (w/ fast wake-up time: ~10ns, and consumes only half of the active power) – Self-refresh: only refreshing is happening (much less power consumption, requires several 100 cycles) – Deep power-down: refreshing stopped (lost data) Figure from:

18 Display LCD itself consumes minimal energy, yet display front- and back-light dominates.. – Possible to dim lights of “light” pixels (for energy saving) Organic light-emitting diode (OLED) – Better quality than LCD (fast response), but it’s emissive and can’t make use of ambient light (energy consuming..)

19 Wireless Networking Technologies – WiFi, Bluetooth – 2G/3G/4G cellular communications Power consumption: BT < WiFi < 2/3/4G Caveats: – bit/joule must be considered – bit/joule varies with data rate Cool-Tether: Energy Efficient On-the-fly WiFi Hot-spots using Mobile Phones, CoNext 2009

20 Andrew Rice and Simon Hay Percom 2010 Decomposing power measurements for mobile devices

21 We want to know how much energy a particular action will consume

22 Example: joining the wireless network consumes 6 Joules HTC G1 (or Magic), Android 1.1, 194 trials

23 We measure energy consumption by intercepting the power supply Both voltages are sampled at 250 kHz Power ∝ V1 x V2 V1 V2 0.02Ω

24 Trace of the G1 boot process HTC G1 (or Magic), Android 1.1

25 Joining a wireless network: DHCP Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol (DHCP) – Provides automatic configuration of the host connected to network – Provides hosts with initial configuration information upon bootup: IP address with subnet mask, default gateway, IP address of the DNS server determine configuration determine configuration DHCP discover DHCP offer select configuration DHCP request DHCP ack Initialization completes graceful shutdown DHCP release discard lease using the allocated configuration (selected)(not selected)

26 Joining a wireless network: ARP Address Resolution Protocol (ARP) and Reverse ARP (RARP): translation between IP and MAC addresses

27 Joining a wireless network: ARP

28

29 Access point beacons correlate with spikes in the power trace HTC G1 (or Magic), Android 1.1

30 Timestamped events from the phone must be aligned with the appropriate sample points

31 The synchronization information is embedded in power trace HTC G1 (or Magic), Android 1.1 Bright screen Dimmed screen

32 Hypothesis matching pulses HTC G1 (or Magic), Android 1.1 g(t)

33 Find alignment from autocorrelation with a hypothesized signal HTC G1 (or Magic), Android 1.1 f(t) Cross-correlation: a measure of similarity of two waveforms as a function of a time-lag applied to one of them. Autocorrelation: cross-correlation of a signal with itself; there will always be a peak at a lag of zero, unless the signal is a trivial zero signal. autocorrelation (f*f)(t) – cross-correlation (f*g)(t)

34 HTC G1 (or Magic), Android 1.1

35 Remove the DHCP overhead by using static addressing HTC G1 (or Magic), Android 1.1

36 Static addressing reduces the connection cost to 1.5 Joules Static AddressingDynamic Addressing HTC G1 (or Magic), Android 1.1, Static = 143 trials, Dynamic = 194 trials

37 We could remove the ARP probes from our client implementation “ARP probe”: ARP probe is broadcast to see if the address is already in use RFC2131 “...the client SHOULD probe the newly received address, e.g., with ARP.” RFC2119 – SHOULD “...there may exist valid reasons in particular circumstances to ignore a particular item”

38 Enter the

39 Android 2.1 doesn't ARP probe in our tests

40 Dynamic addressing now costs 1.5J Dynamic Addressing N1 Google N1, Android 2.1, 100 trials / HTC G1 (or Magic), Android 1.1, 194 trials Dynamic Addressing G1

41 The G1 histogram peaks are due to discontinuities in connection time HTC G1 (or Magic), Android 1.1, Dynamic Joules consumed Time to connect (seconds)

42 Caused by power control in radio? HTC G1 (or Magic), Android 1.1, Dynamic Power (Watts) DHCP Start DHCP Finish

43 This power control is evident when sending data too Send 7K of data over TCPSend 8K of data over TCP HTC G1 (or Magic), Android 1.1

44 This effect has a big impact on energy cost HTC G1 (or Magic), Android 1.1, 1120 Trials (HTC Hero, Android 1.5 is the same)

45 N1 energy performance Best case: same Worst case: much better Google N1, Android 2.1, 900 Trials


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