Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Microprocessor or Microcontroller Not just a case of “you say tomarto and I say tomayto” M. Smith, ECE University of Calgary, Canada.

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "Microprocessor or Microcontroller Not just a case of “you say tomarto and I say tomayto” M. Smith, ECE University of Calgary, Canada."— Presentation transcript:

1 Microprocessor or Microcontroller Not just a case of “you say tomarto and I say tomayto” M. Smith, ECE University of Calgary, Canada

2 13 September 2006 Differences between a microprocessor and a microcontroller M. Smith, University of Calgary, Canada 2/ 29 Information taken from Analog Devices On-line Manuals with permission Information furnished by Analog Devices is believed to be accurate and reliable. However, Analog Devices assumes no responsibility for its use or for any infringement of any patent other rights of any third party which may result from its use. No license is granted by implication or otherwise under any patent or patent right of Analog Devices. Copyright  Analog Devices, Inc. All rights reserved.

3 13 September 2006 Differences between a microprocessor and a microcontroller M. Smith, University of Calgary, Canada 3/ 29 To be tackled today Basic microprocessor Concept of a microcontroller Difference between the Blackfin microcontroller and Blackfin Ez-Kit Lite evaluation board Capabilities of the ADSP-BF533 Blackfin Ez- Kit Lite evaluation board Various acronyms that will be used in the course

4 13 September 2006 Differences between a microprocessor and a microcontroller M. Smith, University of Calgary, Canada 4/ 29 Microprocessor – Basic concept CPU contains CCU ALU data registers and pointer registers ADDRESS BUS 32-bit / 64-bit wide CONTROL BUS Timing signals, ready signals, interrupts etc DATA BUS – bidirectional 8-bit / 16-bit / 32-bit / 128-bit Microprocessor, by-itself, completely useless – must have external peripherals to Interact with outside world

5 13 September 2006 Differences between a microprocessor and a microcontroller M. Smith, University of Calgary, Canada 5/ 29 MicroPROCESSOR – Basic concept CPU contains CCU ALU data registers and pointer registers CONTROL ADDRESS DATA Microprocessor, by-itself, completely useless – must have external peripherals to Interact with outside world BOOT ROM Used at startup Instruction (program) ROM Transducers Keyboard Screen UART Parallel interface etc Data RAM

6 13 September 2006 Differences between a microprocessor and a microcontroller M. Smith, University of Calgary, Canada 6/ 29 Every external device needs this amount of support “glue logic” to work External Device Device itself with all necessary internal logic DATA BUS OE – output enable Interrupt signals, etc ADDRESS BUS DECODE LOGIC Address strobe Data strobe Read/Write control CS – chip select

7 13 September 2006 Differences between a microprocessor and a microcontroller M. Smith, University of Calgary, Canada 7/ 29 Issues with external devices Many pins  Mechanical failure rates increased  Design time increased – routing issues  Cost increased, board size increased Continually redesigning same thing  Compatibility between parts  Upgrade part  Many similar options between different projects In Real-life -- Don’t need “100% flexibility”

8 13 September 2006 Differences between a microprocessor and a microcontroller M. Smith, University of Calgary, Canada 8/ 29 MicroCONTROLLER – Basic concept CPU contains CCU ALU data registers and pointer registers CONTROL ADDRESS DATA Microcontroller – put a limited amount of most commonly used resources “inside” the chip – a “limited” amount is often “enough” for many applications BOOT ROM Used at startup Instruction (program) ROM Transducers UART Parallel interface Etc Data RAM

9 13 September 2006 Differences between a microprocessor and a microcontroller M. Smith, University of Calgary, Canada 9/ 29 Advantages of microCONTROLLER over microPROCESSOR Pin count down Design time down, Board layout size down Upgrade path easier – matching between peripherals for speed Cost down – bulk purchases Reliability up Common software / hardware design environment available from manufacturer

10 13 September 2006 Differences between a microprocessor and a microcontroller M. Smith, University of Calgary, Canada 10/ 29 Issues when using microcontroller Two types of memory – speed issues when using  On-chip – fast, easy to access, “almost like a register”, limited amount of on-chip memory available  Off-chip – slower  Use on-chip memory in a “cache” mode (copy off-chip data to on- chip when processing data, then copy back) External components still there  E.g. Video CODECs – need to use DMA – Direct Memory Access – so that the controller can get on with the “processing” and let something else worry about moving data in and out of the chip Real time environment  Event driven – can’t WAIT for a device to become ready, can’t POLL to see if device is ready, interrupt handling is key All these resources are “power hungry” and compete for resources (data busses etc) – special features

11 13 September 2006 Differences between a microprocessor and a microcontroller M. Smith, University of Calgary, Canada 11/ 29 Components of the Blackfin Board From smallest to largest Processor Core  One core on Blackfin ADSP-BF533  Two cores on Blackfin ADSP-BF561 Processor itself Blackfin Evaluation board  Don’t forget the software development package VisualDSP++

12 13 September 2006 Differences between a microprocessor and a microcontroller M. Smith, University of Calgary, Canada 12/ 29 Blackfin ADSP-BF533

13 13 September 2006 Differences between a microprocessor and a microcontroller M. Smith, University of Calgary, Canada 13/ 29 Enter some key discussed elements from previous slide You need to do a “load” and “store” at the same time – what registers will need to be used? Why can you do 2 loads at the same time, a load and store at the same time, but not two stores? Why would you want 8-bit ALUs operations available on a processor with 32-bit registers? Give an example of an instruction where four 8-bit ALU operations occur at the same time Give an example of an instruction where two 16-bit ALU operations occur at the same time

14 13 September 2006 Differences between a microprocessor and a microcontroller M. Smith, University of Calgary, Canada 14/ 29

15 13 September 2006 Differences between a microprocessor and a microcontroller M. Smith, University of Calgary, Canada 15/ 29 Enter the key elements from previous slide Will you learn to “flash” memory in this class, and how would you do it and why? What does a watch-dog timer do – and “how do you find out how to feed it?” What does the acronym MMU stand for? What does the acronym SPI stand for, and in what labs will we be using the SPI? When is the PPI used? What’s a real time clock?

16 13 September 2006 Differences between a microprocessor and a microcontroller M. Smith, University of Calgary, Canada 16/ 29

17 13 September 2006 Differences between a microprocessor and a microcontroller M. Smith, University of Calgary, Canada 17/ 29 Lab. 1 – demonstration of microcontroller capability Use the microcontroller  Configure the FLASH memory Contains memory and also I/O components (input / output)  Use the FLASH memory I/O capability to control the LED  Configure the PF I/O lines (Programmable flags) Used to control many of the external devices (chip select and timing lines) Used as input (Lab. 2) and / or interrupt lines (Lab. 3)

18 13 September 2006 Differences between a microprocessor and a microcontroller M. Smith, University of Calgary, Canada 18/ 29 Need to learn how to “configure” the flash memory so that We can control the LEDs Parallel interfaces present on the FLASH memory chips

19 13 September 2006 Differences between a microprocessor and a microcontroller M. Smith, University of Calgary, Canada 19/ 29 Push-button switches (PF lines) LED (controlled by FLASH memory logic)

20 13 September 2006 Differences between a microprocessor and a microcontroller M. Smith, University of Calgary, Canada 20/ 29 Need to configure the PF lines (Programmable Flags) Replace one button input with the input of a temperature transducer TMP03 will be used in Laboratory 2

21 13 September 2006 Differences between a microprocessor and a microcontroller M. Smith, University of Calgary, Canada 21/ 29 Control of the PF lines – how / why?

22 13 September 2006 Differences between a microprocessor and a microcontroller M. Smith, University of Calgary, Canada 22/ 29 PF lines being used already to control other devices – “We are not alone!!” When we change the PF registers, we must ONLY change those over which we have control PF8, PF9, PF10, PF11 Must learn the instructions to safely change some register bits and not others (AND and OR instructions)

23 13 September 2006 Differences between a microprocessor and a microcontroller M. Smith, University of Calgary, Canada 23/ 29 Enter the key elements from previous slide Which A/D is used on the Blackfin board? Why are the signals that control the LED’s coming from the FLASH? What does SPORT1 means, and what external device is being controlled by it? How does the SPORT device allow “time sharing” of the bus by several different external devices?

24 13 September 2006 Differences between a microprocessor and a microcontroller M. Smith, University of Calgary, Canada 24/ 29 Audio-Video Interaction of ADSP-BF533 Ez-Kit Lite with the outside world

25 13 September 2006 Differences between a microprocessor and a microcontroller M. Smith, University of Calgary, Canada 25/ 29

26 13 September 2006 Differences between a microprocessor and a microcontroller M. Smith, University of Calgary, Canada 26/ 29 Review quiz CPU stands for CCU stands for ALU stands for DMA stands for

27 13 September 2006 Differences between a microprocessor and a microcontroller M. Smith, University of Calgary, Canada 27/ 29 Review Quiz How come the FLASH memory can be used to control the LEDs? Why can’t we use PF0 line in Lab. 2 to read temperature transducer signals? Why will AND and OR operations be necessary when we control the PF lines? What does PF stand for?

28 13 September 2006 Differences between a microprocessor and a microcontroller M. Smith, University of Calgary, Canada 28/ 29 Tackled today Basic microprocessor Concept of a microcontroller Difference between the Blackfin microcontroller and Blackfin Ez-Kit Lite evaluation board Capabilities of the ADSP-BF533 Blackfin Ez- Kit Lite evaluation board Various acronyms that will be used in the course


Download ppt "Microprocessor or Microcontroller Not just a case of “you say tomarto and I say tomayto” M. Smith, ECE University of Calgary, Canada."

Similar presentations


Ads by Google