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The Sleeping Giant Awakens The United States and World War II Legislation, Japanese Aggression, Pearl Harbor, and Internment.

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Presentation on theme: "The Sleeping Giant Awakens The United States and World War II Legislation, Japanese Aggression, Pearl Harbor, and Internment."— Presentation transcript:

1 The Sleeping Giant Awakens The United States and World War II Legislation, Japanese Aggression, Pearl Harbor, and Internment

2 American Foreign Policy What was American foreign policy following World War I? “This nation will remain a neutral nation, but I cannot ask that every American remain neutral in thought as well. Even a neutral has a right to take account of facts, even a neutral cannot be asked to close his mind or close his conscience. I have said not once but many times that I have seen war and that I hate war… I hope the United States will keep out of this war, I believe that it will. And I give you assurance and reassurance that every effort of your government will be directed toward that end. As long as it remains within my power to prevent there will be no blackout of peace in the United States.” President Roosevelt during a Fireside Chat What piece of legislation did the United States pass in response to the outbreak of World War II? The Neutrality Acts 1.Cash-and-Carry 2.Lend-Lease Act

3 The Neutrality Acts passed in 1935 What did it do? Designed to prevent the United States from being dragged into a European war as a result of Nazi Germany’s actions. It established a mandatory arms embargo against: Victim and Aggressor

4 Cash-and-Carry Policy added in 1937 What did it do? Belligerents could only purchase NON-MILITARY goods from the United States. Goods had to be purchased with cash and carried away on non-American vessels.

5 Lend-Lease Act added in 1941 What did it do? Further promoted the defense of the United States. Amended the Neutrality Act to allow the United States to sell weapons BUT only to nations deemed “vital to the defense of the United States”. Which nations in the war were vital to the defense of the United States?

6 QUESTION. What events caused the Empire of Japan to attack the United States?

7 Japanese-American Relations Japanese Aggression? 1931: Invaded Manchuria 1937: Invaded mainland China (Second Sino-Japanese War and the Rape of Nanking) 1940: Invaded French Indochina. Why was Japan expanding its empire? Needed resources for war. Three Conditions that Bothered the United States? 1. Alliance with Italy and Germany 2. A proposed unified Asia 3. Refusal to leave China How did the United States respond to Japanese aggression? Froze Japanese assets (Japan lost 75% of its trade and 88% of its imported oil.) Japan faced a problem… stop invading and lose their empire or continue and risk war?

8 Japanese-American Relations

9 Pearl Harbor December 7 th, 1941 “A date which will live in infamy…” Pearl Harbor - National Geographic

10 QUESTION. Do you believe that the attack on Pearl Harbor was a success for the Japanese?

11 Pearl Harbor December 7 th, 1941 Ships Sunk & Completely Lost?Sunk & Rebuilt, Slightly or Not Damaged USS Arizona USS Oklahoma USS Utah sailors & soldiers dead sailors & soldiers wounded USS Nevada USS West Virginia USS California USS Pennsylvania USS Tennessee USS Maryland USS New Orleans USS San Francisco USS Raleigh USS Detroit USS Phoenix 70+ More ships NOT including submarines, large supplies of oil on the island, planes, and NO aircraft carriers.

12 QUESTION. So, who is to blame for Pearl Harbor?

13 QUESTION. Should the United States have gotten involved prior to the Attack on Pearl Harbor?

14 “Yesterday, December 7th, a date which will live in infamy –December 7th, 1941 the United States of America was suddenly and deliberately attacked by naval and air forces of the Empire of Japan.”

15 Making the Nation “Safe” Japanese Internment in the United States Complete the handout on Japanese Internment in the United States.

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17 “A Jap is a Jap. It makes no difference whether he is an American citizen or not.” Gen. John L. DeWitt 127,000 Issei & Nisei interned in In 1944? Internment ruled constitutionally permissible due to the war in Korematsu v. United States. The need to stop espionage in the nation outweighed an individuals basic rights. Making the Nation “Safe”

18 Japanese Internment in the United States George Yamamoto & the Incident at Great Meadows

19 George Yamamoto Torazo Matsumoto Kazumasa “Frank” Kitagawa Katsuji “Edward” Taniguchi Ted Miyamura Gila Relocation Center Phoenix, AZ to… Edward Kowalick’s Farm Great Meadows, NJ

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21 Mr. Kowalick was fond of Mr. Yamamoto as he “saved him time”. “Mr. Yamamoto went to work cleaning up the cabin, unpacking his bedroll, caulking the windows and mending the latch on the front door… he sat down and wrote his family a letter. He told them he had had wonderful luck, that he had found a good place and would be sending for them soon.” Report in LIFE Magazine by Faith Fair

22 “But the telephones in Great Meadows were already ringing... ‘A Jap is in town. Saw him with my own eyes. Got slant eyes and looks mean.’ There were tales of arson and rape. The farmers had heard that Japanese could produce celery cheaper than Americans. There was talk of how their children would soon be sitting next to yellow children in school.” Sign placed in the front of Mr. Kowalick’s farm

23 What Happened Next? George Yamamoto in Newtown, Pennsylvania after leaving Great Meadows

24 What Happened Next?


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