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When Generations Collide When Generations Collide Patty Scott, Ed.D. President President Southwestern Oregon Community College

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Presentation on theme: "When Generations Collide When Generations Collide Patty Scott, Ed.D. President President Southwestern Oregon Community College"— Presentation transcript:

1 When Generations Collide When Generations Collide Patty Scott, Ed.D. President President Southwestern Oregon Community College pscott@socc.edu

2 Providing A Contextual Framework Generation Identity is a state of mind shaped by many events and influences – usually 19-24 years long Understanding Generational Differences sets a context of who we are and a context about our employees/customers/club members

3 Generation Birth Years Awakening1701–1723 Liberty1724–1741 Republican1742–1766 Compromise1767–1791 Transcendental1792–1821 Gilded1822–1842 Progressive1843–1859 Missionary1860–1882 Lost1883–1900 G.I.1901–1924 Silent1925–1942 Boom1943–1960 Generation X1961–1981 Millennial/Gen Y1982-2002

4 Silent Generation Born between 1925–1945(75 Million)or 1925-1942 Silent Generation Born between 1925–1945(75 Million)or 1925-1942 Loyal Peaceful, traditional home life Heroes were politicians Conforming, Respect Chain of Command Safe, stable, lifelong jobs Symbols are Important Waste not, Want not Material possessions scarce Strong work ethic/morals Defining Moments: WW1 & 2 Great Depression GI Bill New Deal Never elected a president from their ranks Bracero program Japanese camps

5 Baby Boomers Born between 1946 – 1964 (80 Million) or 1943-1960 Largest generation of their time/will work longer than their parents Idealists/Optimistic Quest for social justice and equality reigned Need to know things Question authority/broke old patterns/traditions Competitive Profession consistent with ideals Activist generation Defining Moments: JFK, MLK, Robert Kennedy The Beatles, the Grateful Dead, Elvis, TelevisionVietnam Civil Rights First man on the moon Watergate Black Power Women’s Rights Chicano, Asian American, African American Civil Rights Movement

6 Generation X Born between 1965 – 1981 (46 Million) or 1961-1981 Question authority/Skeptical Most Misunderstood Economic uncertainty Broken homes; rise in teen pregnancy & drug use Latch-key and day care kids Self-directed/Resourceful Independent Greatest diversity Educated Mistrust of Institutions/Relationships Heroes? What heroes? Defining Moments: Star Wars (the movie) MicrowavesAIDS Cable TV/MTV Tiananmen Square, Exxon Valdez, SF Earthquake President Reagan shot Personal Computers/Fax Machines Drunk Driving Penalties On going Civil Rights Movement Title 9

7 Millennials, Gen Y, Gen Next, Echo Gen, Tech Gen Born between 1982 – 2002 (76 Million) Millennials, Gen Y, Gen Next, Echo Gen, Tech Gen Born between 1982 – 2002 (76 Million) Creative/Smart generation High-tech, high-touch Included in major family decisions, multi-taskers Confident, Realistic about challenges of modern life Service is key Personal Safety #1 concern Collaborative Appreciates Diversity-- part of life/workplace Defining Moments: Operation Desert Storm Zero tolerance rules I-Pods & Video I-Pods Oklahoma city Bombing Columbine Shooting Racism Awareness Workshops – sky rocket Increased High School Drop outs 911 2002 Election 2008 Election

8 Cuspers Traditionalist / Baby Boomers – 1940-1945 Boomers / Generation X – 1960-1965 Generation X / Millennial – 1975-1980

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10 Why should we care about four generations interacting? People are living and working longer Four generations, each with distinct values, are working side by side Turnover rates are on the rise, with massive retirements occurring, declining membership Different values, experiences, work styles, and attitudes are creating misunderstandings and frustrations Understanding the generations can give organizations a competitive edge in recruiting, retaining, managing, and motivating the best and the brightest If we want to recruit respective generations, we must address their values, interests, language, motivators, and styles

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12 Core Traits of Millennials: Special/Parenting Co-purchasing with parentsCo-purchasing with parents Highly involved parents comingHighly involved parents coming Devotion from parents expected in workplaceDevotion from parents expected in workplace Special or spoiledSpecial or spoiled You are special and we expect special things from youYou are special and we expect special things from you Decline in # reporting values different than parentsDecline in # reporting values different than parents Deeper agreement on cultural valuesDeeper agreement on cultural values Moving back home has lost its stigmaMoving back home has lost its stigma

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14 Core Traits of Millennials: Sheltered Amber Alert generationAmber Alert generation Expect adult protection, authoritative security and rule enforcementExpect adult protection, authoritative security and rule enforcement Comfortable with zero toleranceComfortable with zero tolerance Take less health risksTake less health risks Expect rising attention to sexual harassmentExpect rising attention to sexual harassment Want a broader array of protective safeguardsWant a broader array of protective safeguards

15 Core Traits of Millennials: Confident/Entitlement Believe they can achieve great things Faith that America’s big problems really can be solved Believe they will be financially more successful than parents. Confidence or cockiness Want to be heard Expect recognition for work well done

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17 Core Traits of Millennials: Team-Oriented/Collaboration Work as a Team SportWork as a Team Sport Look after each other, help the communityLook after each other, help the community Social environment in office importantSocial environment in office important Use of technology is a group activityUse of technology is a group activity Service-oriented – pursuing nonprofit and government jobsService-oriented – pursuing nonprofit and government jobs Social aspects of job importantSocial aspects of job important Inclusive styleInclusive style “Friending” on Facebook“Friending” on Facebook New communication styles – 10.6 hours/dayNew communication styles – 10.6 hours/day

18 Core Traits of Millennials: Pressured/Need for Speed Stress is a realityStress is a reality Connection between today’s behavior and tomorrow’s payoffConnection between today’s behavior and tomorrow’s payoff Pressured environment – fixated on long-term planningPressured environment – fixated on long-term planning Emotional stressEmotional stress MultitaskingMultitasking Want response immediatelyWant response immediately

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20 Core Traits of Millennials: Social Networking Gather around the Virtual Water CoolerGather around the Virtual Water Cooler The Networked GenerationThe Networked Generation I feel Naked without my cell phoneI feel Naked without my cell phone Constant contactConstant contact Judge me by what I produce, not by what you assume I am doing at my deskJudge me by what I produce, not by what you assume I am doing at my desk Consumer reports to consumerConsumer reports to consumer

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22 Core Traits of Millennials: Achieving/Great Expectations/ Meaning Spend to much time focused on grades and performingSpend to much time focused on grades and performing High expectations for fulfillment and successHigh expectations for fulfillment and success Offended by the idea of having to pay duesOffended by the idea of having to pay dues Expect the moonExpect the moon Want to be heardWant to be heard Want to know they are succeedingWant to know they are succeeding Work/life balanceWork/life balance

23 Summary points on Millennials Parents are deeply involved in all aspects of their child’s experience. Have high expectations for on-line services. Safety and security matter. Safety and security matter. Millennial expect to be treated special. Team-oriented and collaborators. Need for speed and connection. Have expectations and seek meaning Social Networked

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25 References Howe, N. and Strauss W. (2007). Millennials Go to College Howe, N. (2010). Millennials in the workplace Howe, N. and Strauss W. (2000). Millennials Rising: The next great generation Lancaster, L, and Stillman, D. (2002). When generations collide. Lancaster, L.C. & Stillman (2010). The M-factor: How the Millennial Generation is rocking the workplace.

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27 Defining Your Generation Growing up, what one word describes our relationship with your parents? What one work describes your attitude about employee evaluations? Are there any gender/cultural/ethnic, class differences within your generation? If you participated in athletics, describe your relationship with the coach?

28 Applying Our Work to Different Generations How do we market/recruit/retain different generations? How do we provide customer services? How do club members learn from different generations? How do we coach/supervise/work with our club members from different generations?


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