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Prose  Words  Phrases  Sentences  Paragraphs  Chapters Prose  Words  Phrases  Sentences  Paragraphs  Chapters Poetry  Syllables  Feet  Lines.

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Presentation on theme: "Prose  Words  Phrases  Sentences  Paragraphs  Chapters Prose  Words  Phrases  Sentences  Paragraphs  Chapters Poetry  Syllables  Feet  Lines."— Presentation transcript:

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2 Prose  Words  Phrases  Sentences  Paragraphs  Chapters Prose  Words  Phrases  Sentences  Paragraphs  Chapters Poetry  Syllables  Feet  Lines  Stanzas  Cantos Poetry  Syllables  Feet  Lines  Stanzas  Cantos Basically, poetry is shorter, more condensed, and in a different physical form. This may help you to visualize the basic differences:

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6  The iamb ˘ ′  The trochee ′ ˘  The anapest ˘ ˘ ′  The dactyl ′ ˘ ˘  The spondee ′ ′ (tŏ dáy) (bĕ cáuse) (thĕ sún) (háp pў) (líght lў) (wént tŏ) (cĭg ă rétte) (ĭn tĕr rúpt) (ĭn thĕ dárk) (ób vĭ oŭs) (rég ŭ l ă r) (cólŏr ŏf) (dówn tówn) (báth róbe) (trúe blúe) The foot is the basic building block of poetry. It is com- posed of a pattern of syllables. These patterns cause the meter of the poem. Meter is a pattern of beats or ac- cents. Figure this out by counting the stressed and un- stressed syllables in a line. Unstressed = ˘ and Stressed = ′

7  1 foot  2 feet  3 feet  4 feet  5 feet  6 feet  7 feet  8 feet  9 feet = monometer =dimeter =trimeter =tetrameter =pentameter =hexameter =heptameter =octameter =nonometer Unlike the prose sentence that is determined by subject, verb, and punctuation, the poetic line is measured by the number of feet it contains.

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10 You should now understand that syllables form feet, feet form lines, and lines form stanzas. Stanzas also have names:

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12 Answer: 74

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14 Types of rhyme:  End rhyme: the last words of two or more lines rhyme  Internal rhyme: words within a line rhyme  Masculine rhyme: most frequently used- the last stressed syllable of the rhyming words match exactly. (“The play’s the thing/Wherein I’ll catch the conscience of the king.”)  Feminine rhyme: two consecutive syllables of the rhyming words, with the first syllable stressed. (“The horses were prancing / as the clowns were dancing.”) Types of rhyme:  End rhyme: the last words of two or more lines rhyme  Internal rhyme: words within a line rhyme  Masculine rhyme: most frequently used- the last stressed syllable of the rhyming words match exactly. (“The play’s the thing/Wherein I’ll catch the conscience of the king.”)  Feminine rhyme: two consecutive syllables of the rhyming words, with the first syllable stressed. (“The horses were prancing / as the clowns were dancing.”) Finding a poem’s rhyme scheme is easy. Remember that you always use the last word in each line to determine the rhyme scheme. The purpose is to identify and establish a pattern and to consider if the pattern helps to develop sound and/or meaning. Always use lower case letters: a b a c b c …

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