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Music For Everyone NAfME – October 2014 Berta Hickox Alice Hammel DIFFERENTIATING ASSESSMENT FOR ALL LEARNERS.

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Presentation on theme: "Music For Everyone NAfME – October 2014 Berta Hickox Alice Hammel DIFFERENTIATING ASSESSMENT FOR ALL LEARNERS."— Presentation transcript:

1 Music For Everyone NAfME – October 2014 Berta Hickox Alice Hammel DIFFERENTIATING ASSESSMENT FOR ALL LEARNERS

2 Rationale for “winding it back” Our literacy sequences are commonly linear, and rerouting or remediating becomes difficult in a general music classroom. In every class, students begin to fall behind as they skip steps or get lost in our teaching sequences. We commonly encounter students who are entering our classroom after other students have had years of sequenced instruction.

3 Rationale for “winding it back” We also frequently teach students who have already mastered our current, and perhaps future, goals and who are hoping for a challenge or for more difficult content in music class. By ‘winding back’ or ‘winding forward’ we can accommodate the needs of all students while continuing to teach ALL students in our music classrooms.

4 Winding it Back – Rhythmic Example Activity: T. speaks a 4-beat rhythm pattern (duple) including quarter notes and eighth notes; individual students decode the pattern into rhythm syllables. Queen Caroline

5 Winding it Back – Rhythmic Example Activity: 1. review several rhythm patterns including the new rhythm (verbal association) 2. T. speaks 4-beat pattern on neutral syllable 3. c. echoes 4-beat pattern on neutral syllable 4. c. decodes 4-beat pattern in rhythm syllables

6 Winding it Back – Rhythmic Example Steps the students have previously performed to lead up to this activity = steps to ‘wind it back’ 1. aural/oral patterning (neutral syllable to neutral syllable) 2. verbal association patterning (rhythm syllable to rhythm syllable) 3. duple rhymes 4. speak rhyme + patsch beat - solo 5. speak rhyme + point the visual – solo 6. speak rhyme + show beat division – solo 7. speak rhyme + show beat or beat division

7 Winding it Back – Rhythmic Example 8. speak rhyme + show beat + show beat division 9. speak rhyme + tap rhythm – solo 10. speak rhyme, switch between beat, beat division and rhythm 11. speak rhyme + show beat + tap rhythm - solo 12. speak rhyme, patsch quarter note/beat, tap eighth notes/beat division 13. name the beat “ta” and the beat division “ta-ti” 14. speak the rhyme in rhythm syllables, patsch quarter note/beat, tap eighth notes/beat division 15. speak all known rhymes in rhythm syllables 16. improvise using rhythm syllables

8 Winding it Forward – Rhythmic Example Steps to ‘wind it forward’: Student improvises a 4-beat rhythm pattern (duple) including quarter notes and eighth notes for the class or another student to decode Student decodes a series of 4-beat rhythm patterns (duple) including quarter notes and eighth notes Student decodes a series of 4-beat rhythm patterns (duple) including quarter notes and eighth notes while conducting a 2- pattern

9 Winding it Back – Melodic Example Activity: Students sight sing unknown melodic patterns from a tone set containing sol and mi when s = space 3. See Saw

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11 Winding It Back – Melodic Example Activity: 1. c. reviews the staff placement of the pitches when s = space 3 2. T. points an unnamed but familiar song on the tone set, c. sings the solfa and identifies the song 3. T. points several known melodic patterns on the staff, c. sings in solfa 4. T. points several less familiar or unknown melodic patterns on the staff, c. sings in solfa 5. T. selects from volunteers to perform step 4 individually

12 Winding it Back – Melodic Example Steps the students have previously performed to lead up to this activity= steps to ‘wind it back’ 1. vocal exploration and pitch-matching activities 2. aural/oral patterns (neutral syllable to neutral syllable) 3. verbal association patterns (solfa to solfa) 4. songs including only sol and mi 5. high and low activities (listening and responding to high and low pitches; stars & basket) 6. body solfa (high sounds = hands on head; low sounds = hands on shoulders) 7. sing known songs with text and body solfa - solo 8. sing known songs using the words “high” and “low” with body solfa. 9. name the high sound “sol” and the low sound “mi”

13 Winding it Back – Melodic Example 10. sing known songs using solfa and body solfa - solo 11. hand signs for sol and mi 12. sing known songs using solfa and hand signs - solo 13. improvise using sol and mi (body solfa and/or hand signs) - solo 14. decode 2-4 pitch patterns into solfa - solo 15. “write” solfa patterns with melodic icons 16. introduce the staff 17. read known songs from the staff when sol and mi are line notes 18. read known songs from the staff when sol and mi are space notes 19. Students sight sing unknown melodic patterns from the staff when sol and mi are line notes 20. Students sight sing unknown melodic patterns from the staff when sol and mi are space notes

14 Differentiated Assessment Differentiated assessment: The teacher points to patterns from the tone set that correspond with the ability levels of individual students. Students who have challenges with the task will read patterns that are extracted from known songs that the class has previously performed with body solfa and/or hand signs. Students of average ability will be asked to read known patterns first, then will progress to more challenging patterns (i.e. patterns starting on mi or combinations of pitches that have not appeared in song literature). Students in need of additional challenge will sing more challenging patterns such as those starting on mi or unfamiliar combinations of pitches, and may be asked to point to the tone set and sing solfa without teacher help.

15 Ideas for Differentiated Assessment reading flashcards writing with the flyswatter beat flashcards class set of flashcards tone/rhythm ladder or tone set rhythm rondo 2-part flashcards part-work (conducting, HS in canon, adding an ostinato)

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18 Rhythm rondo ABACADAEA

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20 Assessment and “Winding” “The Goal” Sight-reading 5 rhythm flashcards containing the new rhythm concept wise choices for self-leveling when selecting rhythm syllables match the notation correct meter steady and consistent beat

21 Winding it Back Read 3 flashcards containing familiar rhythm patterns with accuracy Read 3-5 flashcards containing rhythm patterns from previous rhythm concept Swatting the correct rhythm pattern from a selection of 3-5 flashcards, when spoken in rhythm syllables by the teacher Swatting the correct rhythm pattern from a selection of 3-5 flashcards, when spoken on a neutral syllable by the teacher

22 Winding it Forward Read a series of 4 flashcards containing familiar rhythm patterns with accuracy Read a series of 4 flashcards containing unknown rhythm patterns with accuracy Read a series of 4 flashcards containing unknown rhythm patterns while tapping an ostinato Choose and read (on a neutral syllable) a rhythm flashcard from a selection of 5 flashcards for a classmate Locate and correct the error in a 4-beat rhythm when the rhythm pattern is spoken on a neutral syllable by the teacher

23 A Modified Parallel Curriculum for a First Grade General Music Class Sol-Mi Notation – Quarter-Eighth Notation (Presentation Stage)

24 Non-modified or adapted curricular goals Modified curricular goals Adapted curricular goals Students will decode quarter eighth patterns from chants that are well-known to them Student will tap the rhythm with words to chants that are well-known to him Student will derive quarter eighth patterns using popsicle sticks given as much time as necessary

25 Non-modified or adapted curricular goals Modified curricular goals Adapted curricular goals Students will apply new rhythm syllables to chants well-known to them Student will chant rhythms that contain quarter/eighth with other students Student will chant using rhythm syllables at a tempo of his choosing

26 Non-modified or adapted curricular goals Modified curricular goals Adapted curricular goals Students will sing sol-mi patterns using neutral syllables Student will approximate higher and lower pitches following individual prompt by teachers Student will sing sol- mi patterns using neutral syllables at a tempo of his choosing

27 Non-modified or adapted curricular goals Modified curricular goals Adapted curricular goals Students will show higher and lower with their hands and with the use of icons Student will show higher and lower through any modality he prefers Student will demonstrate higher and lower using icons and/or body motions

28 Non-modified or adapted curricular goals Modified curricular goals Adapted curricular goals Students will discover the two pitches (sol and mi) and their similarities as noted in several folk songs well- known to them Students will sing folk songs that contain sol-mi with other students Student will discover sol-mi in at least one folk song well-known to him

29 Non-modified or adapted curricular goals Modified curricular goals Adapted curricular goals Students will apply new solfege syllables to chants well-known to them Student will apply new solfege syllables to at least one chant well- known to him

30 Charting Student Learning Objectives Objective: The students will solfege unfamiliar patterns using only notes in the diatonic major scale (steps-no skips), and rhythms that include quarter, paired eighth, and half notes, and equivalent rests.

31 Pitch Matching Steps Pitch Matching Sing major scale on neutral syllables, ascending ☐ Sing major scale on neutral syllables, descending ☐ Sing major scale with solfege, ascending ☐ Sing major scale with solfege, descending ☐ Sing pitches on a staff with solfege ☐ Find and sing “do” using a “do key” ☐

32 Reading Steps Reading Recognize staff ☐ Recognize treble and bass clefs ☐ Understand line and space notes ☐ Name the line in both clefs ☐ Name the space in both clefs ☐ Identify notes on lines and spaces in both clefs ☐ Recognize rhythms: half, quarter, eighth, and equivalent rests ☐ Recognize bar lines and measures ☐ Recognize time signatures 2/4, 3/4 and 4/4 ☐

33 Rhythm Readiness Steps Rhythm Readiness Maintain steady beat ☐ Chant and clap ☐ Perform half notes and rests ☐ Perform quarter notes and rests ☐ Perform paired eighth notes ☐

34 Elementary School Rhythm Reading Adapted Sequence

35 Final Thoughts *Actively teach students how to think: when and how to use strategies and how to problem-solve (metacognition) *Strategize as a class, then in smaller groups: how would you approach a sight singing exercise? Learning a new dance? Improvise in triple meter? This type of work will support common core learning in other subject areas Challenge ALL students at their individual levels. When the student achieves the goal, raise the bar. Think like a solfege teacher Overtly teach the rubric so that students can self-assess: I was able to sing the song in my head voice, sing the correct words and rhythm, and maintain the melodic contour of the song, but I cannot yet maintain good intonation, so my score on the rubric is a 4. Reward learning, not perfection

36 Bibliography Teaching Music to Students with Special Needs: A Label-Free Approach. Alice M. Hammel and Ryan M. Hourigan. Oxford University Press, Teaching Music to Students with Autism. Alice M. Hammel and Ryan M. Hourigan. OxfordUniversity Press, 2013.

37 Contact Information Berta Hickox Alice Hammel


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