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Chapter 10 Opener: The female (left) and the male (right) of the gorgeous lizard.

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Presentation on theme: "Chapter 10 Opener: The female (left) and the male (right) of the gorgeous lizard."— Presentation transcript:

1 Chapter 10 Opener: The female (left) and the male (right) of the gorgeous lizard

2 10.1 Bowerbird courtship revolves around the bower

3 10.2 Evolutionary relationships among 15 populations of bowerbirds

4 10.3 Different bowers in different populations of the same bowerbird species

5 10.4 Bower building may be an indicator of brain size

6 10.5(1) Variance in reproductive success is greater for males than females in the satin bowerbird

7 10.5(2) Variance in reproductive success is greater for males than females in the satin bowerbird

8 10.6 Male and female gametes differ greatly in size

9 10.7 Parental investment takes many forms

10 10.8 Sexual behavior differences between sexes may arise from differences in parental investment

11 10.9 Male sex drive is intense

12 10.10 A sex role reversal in which females, not males, advertise for mates

13 10.11(1) Phylogenetic relationship between complex parental care by males and sex role reversal

14 10.11(2) Phylogenetic relationship between complex parental care by males and sex role reversal

15 10.12 Mormon cricket males give their mates an edible nuptial gift

16 10.13 A katydid that shifts sex roles in relation to the availability of spermatophores

17 10.14 A developmental cost of a sexually selected trait

18 10.15 Sexually selected “ornaments” of males

19 10.16 Males of many species fight, using whatever weapons they have at their disposal

20 10.17 Dominance usually correlates strongly with reproductive success in savanna baboons

21 10.18 Dominant male baboons fail to control fertile females as completely as expected (Part 1)

22 10.18 Dominant male baboons fail to control fertile females as completely as expected (Part 2)

23 10.19 Small males of the marine iguana must cope with sexual interference from larger rivals

24 10.20 Alternative forms of a marine amphipod of the genus Jassa

25 10.21 Satellite male mating tactics

26 10.22 A conditional strategy model in the horseshoe crab

27 10.23 A male Panorpa scorpionfly with its strange scorpion-like abdomen tip

28 10.24 Three different forms of the sponge isopod

29 10.25 Three different egg fertilization behaviors coexist in the bluegill sunfish

30 10.26 A male black-winged damselfly removes a rival’s sperm before transferring his own

31 10.27 Sperm competition has shaped the evolution of the black-winged damselfly’s penis

32 10.28 Sperm competition in the dunnock requires female cooperation

33 10.29 The reproductive anatomy of fertilization in birds

34 10.30 Female collared flycatchers could bias egg fertilizations in favor of an extra-pair mate

35 10.31 Mate guarding occurs in many animals

36 10.32 Adaptive mate guarding by the Seychelles warbler (Part 1)

37 10.32 Adaptive mate guarding by the Seychelles warbler (Part 2)

38 10.33 Male Seychelles warblers adjust their mate guarding in relation to the risk of losing paternity

39 10.34 Food supplies on a bird’s territory affect extra-pair paternity in the house sparrow

40 10.35 A potential nuptial gift

41 10.36 Sperm transfer and the size of nuptial gifts

42 10.37 Sexual suicide in the redback spider

43 10.38 Song repertoire size as an honest signal of male paternal effort

44 10.39 Mate choice based on male performance of a physiologically challenging task (Part 1)

45 10.39 Mate choice based on male performance of a physiologically challenging task (Part 2)

46 10.39 Mate choice based on male performance of a physiologically challenging task (Part 3)

47 10.40 A sexually selected ornament

48 10.41 Has cryptic female mate choice resulted in the evolution of stimulating male genitalia?

49 10.42 Female choice for indicators of health, which may be related to good genes

50 10.43 Male satin bowerbirds provide females with multiple signals (Part 1)

51 10.43 Male satin bowerbirds provide females with multiple signals (Part 2)

52 10.44 Do male ornaments signal good genes? (Part 1)

53 10.44 Do male ornaments signal good genes? (Part 2)

54 10.45 Chase-away selection theory

55 10.46 Sexual selection and the evolution of male traits harmful to females

56 10.47 Mating with large males reduces female fitness in fruit flies

57 10.48 A genital product of conflict between the sexes?

58 10.49 A counteradaptation to male sexual exploitation?

59 10.50 A mutually cannibalistic species: the ultimate in sexual conflict

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