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Youth to Work Coalition

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1 Youth to Work Coalition
Nov. 19, 2014 Welcome! Please sign in the chat box with your name and affiliation Press * 6 to mute or unmute your telephones/cell phones Please mute your computer speakers Call in number (if system doesn’t prompt you) (Code: )

2 The Workforce Innovation & Opportunity Act: An Overview
NSTTAC’s Youth-to-Work Coalition November 19, 2014

3 Presented by Curtis Richards
Director, National Collaborative on Workforce & Disability for Youth (www.ncwd-youth.info) Center for Workforce Development, Institute for Educational Leadership Washington, DC

4 Who We Are National Collaborative on Workforce & Disability for Youth, a national technical assistance center Focus on needs of ALL youth, including youth with disabilities and other disconnected youth Improve state and local policy Strengthen workforce development service delivery Improve competencies of youth service professionals Engage youth and families Supported by Office of Disability Employment Policy, U.S. Department of Labor

5 This Webinar Will Cover:
WIOA Titles WIOA Overview WIOA General Provisions Youth Programs Disability Issues

6 WIOA Titles Title I - Workforce Development Activities, Providers, Job Corps, YouthBuild, Apprenticeship, Adult and Youth Formula, and Administration; Title II - Adult Education and Family Literacy Act; Title III - Wagner Peyser which authorizes the public employment services and the employment statistics system; Title IV - Amendments to the Rehabilitation Act of 1973; and, Title V - General Provisions-repeals WIA in its entirety and provides Secretaries of Labor, Education, and Health & Human Services with authority to establish a smooth, orderly transition.

7 WIOA Overview: Passage
President Barack Obama signed WIOA into law on July 22, 2014. Passed by Congress with wide bipartisan majority (the Senate voted 93-5 and the House of Representatives voted 415-6).

8 WIOA Overview: Vision Broad vision of workforce programs: reaffirms ongoing role of American Job Centers and also requires coordination and alignment of key employment, education, and training programs. Promotes program alignment at the Federal, State, local, and regional levels. Builds on proven practices such as sector strategies, career pathways, regional economic approaches, work-based training.

9 WIOA Overview: Job-Driven Training
Aligns with and complements the President’s Vision for Job-Driven Workforce Development – prepare workers for 21st century jobs and ensure American businesses have skilled workers to be competitive in global economy. The Vice President issued a report, “Ready to Work: Job-Driven Training and American Opportunity,” based on his review of Federal job training programs on July 22, (http://www.whitehouse.gov/sites/default/files/docs/skills _report.pdf)

10 WIOA Programs Supersedes the Workforce Investment Act of 1998 and retains and amends the Adult Education and Family Literacy Act, the Wagner-Peyser Act, and the Rehabilitation Act of 1973. Identifies “core programs:” Adults, Dislocated Workers, and Youth formula programs and Wagner-Peyser employment services administered by the DOL Employment and Training Administration; and Adult education and literacy programs and Vocational Rehabilitation state grant programs that assist individuals with disabilities in obtaining employment administered by ED. Also authorizes the Job Corps, YouthBuild, Indian and Native Americans, and Migrant and Seasonal Farmworker programs, and evaluation and research activities conducted by DOL.

11 Requires States to Strategically Align Workforce Development Programs
Single Unified Strategic Plan - Every state will develop and submit a four-year strategy for core programs. Plans will discuss State’s strategy to prepare an educated and skilled workforce and meet the workforce needs of employers. Must be jointly approved by the Secretaries of Labor and Education within 90 days of receipt. Combined State Plan is an option– States can include other key partners such as Jobs for Veterans State Grant program, Unemployment Insurance, Trade Adjustment Assistance, Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF), Perkins career and technical education programs.

12 Promotes Accountability and Transparency
Core programs and other authorized programs are required to report on common performance indicators: ADULTS Percentage of workers that entered employment Percentage of workers that retained employment Median wages of these workers Credential attainment of these workers Measurable skill gains of these workers. Effectiveness of services to employers. Rhonda: Add youth measures?

13 Promotes Accountability and Transparency
YOUTH (1 of 2 slides) Percentage of program participants who are in education or training activities, or in unsubsidized employment during second quarter after exit Percentage of participants who are in education or training activities or in unsubsidized employment during fourth quarter after exit Median earnings of participants in unsubsidized employment during second quarter after exit Percentage of participants who obtain a recognized postsecondary credential, secondary school diploma or equivalent during participation or within 1 year after program exit

14 Promotes Accountability and Transparency
YOUTH (Continued) Percentage of participants who during a program year are in education that leads to a recognized postsecondary credential or employment and who are achieving measurable gains towards those goals skills gains toward a credential or employment; and employer engagement. Program participants who obtain a secondary school diploma or its recognized equivalent shall be included as meeting the criterion only if such participants, in addition to obtaining such diploma or its recognized equivalent, have obtained or retained employment or are in an education or training program leading to a recognized postsecondary credential within 1 year after exit from the program. Eligible Training Providers required to report data on all youth in a training program.

15 Increases the Quality and Accessibility of Services at America’s Job Centers
States will establish criteria to certify AJCs at least every 3 years to ensure continuous improvement, access to services (including virtual services), and integrated service delivery. Key programs and services will be available at AJCs Wagner-Peyser Employment Service is required to co- locate at AJCs. TANF is a new AJC required partner. States/local areas will integrate intake, case management, and reporting systems, including fiscal and management accountability systems.

16 Improves Services to Employers and Promotes Work-Based Training
WIOA contributes to economic growth and business expansion by ensuring the workforce system is job-driven – matching employers with skilled individuals. State/local boards are responsible for activities to meet workforce needs of local and regional employers. State/local boards will promote use of industry and sector partnerships to address workforce needs of multiple employers within an industry. Local areas can use funds for proven work-based strategies, including incumbent worker training, Registered Apprenticeship, transitional jobs, on-the-job training, and customized training. There are increased reimbursement rates for employers for on-the-job and customized training. Local boards must enhance communication, coordination, and collaboration among employers, economic development entities and service providers to ensure activities meet the needs of employers and support economic growth in the region. In its plan, local boards are to describe their strategies and services for employer engagement, including small employers and employers in in-demand industry sectors and occupations, in workforce programs; how they will support a local system that meets the needs of local employers; how they will better coordinate workforce development programs and economic development; and the implementation of initiatives such as incumbent worker training programs, on-the-job training programs, career pathways initiatives, utilization of effective business intermediaries, and other business services and strategies designed to meet the needs of employers in the corresponding region.

17 Provides Access to High Quality Training
Focus on training that leads to industry recognized post-secondary credentials. States/local areas will use career pathways to provide education and employment and training assistance to accelerate job seekers’ educational and career advancement. Local areas have additional procurement vehicles for training to increase customer choice and quality: individual training accounts, pay for performance contracts, and direct contracts with higher education.

18 Enhances Workforce Services for Adults and Dislocated Workers
WIOA ensures that unemployed and other job seekers have access to high-quality workforce services. WIA service categories of core and intensive services are collapsed into “career services” and there is no required sequence of services, enabling job seekers to access training immediately. Local areas can transfer up to 100% of funds between Adult and Dislocated Worker programs. Local areas can use up to 20 percent of their Adult and Dislocated Worker program funds for incumbent worker training programs. Job seekers who are basic skills deficient, in addition to those who are low-income individuals, have priority for services for the Adult program.

19 WIOA: Strong Career Planning and Development Emphasis (Title I)
DEFINITIONS PROVIDED Career Planning: the provision of a client-centered approach in the delivery of services, designed… (B) to provide job, education, and career counseling, as appropriate during program participation and after job placement. Career Pathway: a combination of rigorous and high-quality education, training, and other services that… (C) includes counseling to support individual in achieving the individual’s education and career goals

20 WIOA: Focus on Disconnected Youth
Must spend at least 75 percent of funds on out-of-school youth, compared to 30 percent under WIA. Also changes youth eligibility requirements by establishing separate criteria for out-of-school and in-school youth Removes income eligibility requirements for most out-of-school youth and raises the eligible age to 16 through 24. In-school youth age eligibility continue to be ages 14-21, as in WIA. Out of school youth are eligible, irrespective of income, if they are in the following categories: school dropouts; youth who have not attended school for the most recent calendar quarter; youth subject to the juvenile or adult justice system; youth who are homeless, a runaway, in foster care or aged out of such care, pregnant or parenting; or youth who have a disability. In addition, also eligible as out-of-school youth are low-income youth who are also basic skills deficient, English language learners, or need additional assistance to enter or complete an educational program or secure or hold employment. In-school youth must be low-income and in one of the categories specified above (except for school dropouts or not attending school). There is a limitation that not more than 5 percent of in-school youth may be eligible under the category of needing additional assistance to complete an education program or secure or hold employment. The WIOA also establishes a special rule under which low-income includes any youth living in a high poverty area

21 WIOA: Separate Criteria for In-School and Out-of-School Youth
Out of School Youth: 16 to 24 In School Youth: 14 to 21 Must be low-income: attending school (as defined by State law); and one or more of the following: Basic skills deficient; youth subject to the juvenile or adult justice system; youth who are homeless, a runaway, in foster care or aged out of such care, pregnant or parenting; or youth who have a disability. No Income Eligibility for: school dropouts; youth who have not attended school for the most recent calendar quarter; youth subject to the juvenile or adult justice system; youth who are homeless, a runaway, in foster care or aged out of such care, pregnant or parenting; or youth who have a disability. Also includes low-income youth who are: basic skills deficient, English language learners, or Need additional assistance to enter or complete an educational program or secure or hold employment. There is a limitation that not more than 5 percent of in-school youth may be eligible under the category of needing additional assistance to complete an education program or secure or hold employment. The WIOA also establishes a special rule under which low-income includes any youth living in a high poverty area

22 WIOA: Youth-Focus on Work-Based Learning
Places a new priority on work-based learning- at least 20 percent of local funds must be used for work experiences summer jobs, pre-apprenticeship training, on-the-job training and internships that have academic and occupational education as a component

23 WIOA: Elimination of Youth Councils
WIOA eliminates the WIA requirement that the local board establish a youth council. WIOA however authorizes, at the discretion of the local board, the establishment of three standing committees to advise the board on One-Stop partner issues, youth services, and services to individuals with disabilities, respectively, and also authorizes the establishment of additional standing committees.

24 Youth Program Elements
WIA youth programs shall provide: tutoring, study skills training, instruction, and evidence-based dropout prevention and recovery strategies that lead to completion of the requirements for a secondary school diploma or its recognized equivalent (including a recognized postsecondary credential); alternative secondary school services, or dropout recovery services, as appropriate; paid and unpaid work experiences that have as a component academic and occupational education, which may include—. summer employment opportunities and other employment opportunities available throughout the school year; pre-apprenticeship programs; internships and job shadowing; on-the-job training opportunities; occupational skill training, which may include priority consideration for training programs that lead to recognized postsecondary credentials that are aligned with in- demand industry sectors or occupations in the local area involved, if the local board determines that the programs meet the quality criteria described in section 123; education offered concurrently with and in the same context as workforce preparation activities and training for a specific occupation or occupational cluster

25 Youth Program Elements
leadership development opportunities, which may include community service and peer centered activities encouraging responsibility and other positive social and civic behaviors, as appropriate; supportive services; adult mentoring for the period of participation and a subsequent period, for a total of not less than 12 months; follow-up services for not less than 12 months after the completion of participation, as appropriate; comprehensive guidance and counseling, which may include drug and alcohol abuse counseling and referral, as appropriate; financial literacy education; entrepreneurial skills training; services that provide labor market and employment information about in-demand industry sectors or occupations available in the local area, such as career awareness, career counseling, and career exploration services; and activities that help youth prepare for and transition to postsecondary education and training.

26 YouthBuild Activities in in-demand industries and occupations in addition to construction are authorized Requires reporting on common performance indicators Also authorizes pre-apprenticeship training as well as Registered Apprenticeship. OWI- Jen

27 Reinforces Connections with Registered Apprenticeship
RA programs are included on eligible training provider list for Adult and Dislocated Worker programs as long as they remain registered. State and local boards will have RA programs representatives as members. RA completion certificates will be recognized as a post- secondary credential. Youth programs may offer pre-apprenticeship training to prepare youth for RA or other career opportunities. RA is recognized as a career pathway for Job Corps students. YouthBuild may offer work experience and skills training in coordination with pre-apprenticeship and Registered Apprenticeship programs.

28 Enhances the Job Corps Program
Focus on opportunities that will lead to successful careers resulting in economic self-sufficiency and prospects for advancement or enrollment in postsecondary education, as well as supporting responsible citizenship. Amends the assignment plan to provide for placements at centers closest to home that offer the type of career and technical education selected by the individual rather than just the centers closest to home. Adds two exceptions to the general limitation that the period of enrollment is not to exceed two years. Under WIA the only exception was for completion for an advanced career training program. Under WIOA the first addition is for individuals with disabilities who would reasonably be expected to graduate if allowed to participate for up to 1 additional year. This provision could have significant implications since a large percentage of Job Corps enrollees have disabilities. The second is for individuals who participate in national service programs, as authorized by the Civilian Conservation Center program, for a period equal to the period of national service.

29 Enhances the Job Corps Program
Job Corps will report on Youth program’s common performance measures to increase alignment between programs. RA is recognized as a career pathway for Job Corps students. Changes the Job Corps center selection process so that competition is used to increase performance and quality of services to Job Corps students. Job Corps annual report to Congress will include performance data for recruiters and career transition service providers. Requires reports to Congress on Job Corps financial status for the first 5 years after enactment.

30 Improves Services to Individuals with Disabilities
Increases access to high quality workforce services and preparation for competitive integrated employment. AJCs will provide physical and programmatic accessibility to employment and training services for individuals with disabilities. Local boards may designate a standing committee to provide information and assist with operational and other issues related to compliance with non-discrimination and applicable accessibility requirements provide input regarding appropriate training for staff on these issues. Establishes a committee to advise the Secretary of Labor on strategies to increase competitive integrated employment for individuals with disabilities. Includes Departments of Labor, Education, Health and Human Services, Social Security Administration, and other partners. Local boards will promote proven practices in programmatic and physical accessibility, develop strategies for better using technology to assist people with barriers to employment, and annually assess physical and programmatic accessibility. Physical and programmatic accessibility were also requirements in WIA.

31 Career Development Is Featured Prominently Throughout WIOA Title II (Adult Ed)
Must supply joint plan with other core programs, (or combination plan) and subject to common measures Recognizes core purpose of adult education is to prepare individuals with the skills and knowledge needed to succeed in postsecondary education and the workforce. Promotes the integration of adult education with occupational education and training, as well as development of career pathways systems; authorizes the use of funds for “integrated education and training” and “workforce preparation activities” as activities, programs or services designed to help an individual acquire a combination of specified skills necessary for successful transition into and completion of postsecondary education or training, or employment.

32 Career Development Is Featured Prominently Throughout WIOA Title II (Adult Ed)
Increases the percentage of funding a State agency may use for corrections education from not more than 10 percent under WIA to not more than 20 percent under the Act. The Act also adds to the uses of funds for these programs integrated education and training, career pathways, concurrent enrollment, and transition to re-entry initiatives and other services with the goal of reducing recidivism. Requires the performance reports to include the relative rate of recidivism for those served. Clarifies that integrated English literacy and civics education programs may provide workforce training.

33 Vocational Rehabilitation: Strong Emphasis on Competitive Integrated Employment
Increases services to youth with disabilities: Emphasizes the need for YwD to have more opportunities to practice and improve their workplace skills, to consider their career interests, and to get real world work experience. Requires State vocational rehabilitation (VR) agencies to make “pre-employment transition services” available to all students with disabilities. Requires set aside of at least 15 percent of funds to provide pre- employment transition services Allows State VR agencies to prioritize serving students with disabilities. Allows State VR agencies to support advanced training in STEM and other technical professions. Dedicates half of the Federal Supported Employment program funds to provide youth with the most significant disabilities with the supports they need, including extended services of up to 4 years to enable them to obtain competitive integrated employment Requires career counseling .

34 Other Career-Development Related Activities Authorized Under VR
(2) developing and improving strategies for individuals with intellectual disabilities and individuals with significant disabilities to live independently, participate in postsecondary education experiences, and obtain and retain competitive integrated employment; (3) providing instruction to vocational rehabilitation counselors, school transition personnel, and other persons supporting students with disabilities; (7) developing model transition demonstration projects

35 Section 511: Limitations on Use of Subminimum Wage Pre-Employment (Under Age 24)
Can’t be paid less than the Federal minimum wage unless: individual received pre-employment transition services under the Rehabilitation Act or transition services under the IDEA (job exploration counseling, work-based learning experiences, counseling on post- secondary opportunities, workplace readiness training, and training on self- advocacy, other services if funds are available), and the individual applied for vocational rehabilitation services and was found ineligible (and has documentation of the finding), or was determined eligible for such services, has an individualized plan for employment, has been working toward an employment outcome in the plan with appropriate supports and services for a reasonable period of time without success, and the individual’s vocational rehabilitation case has been closed. Must also receive career counseling and information referrals to Federal or State and other resources that offer employment-related services and supports which can not be provided by the entity with the certificate. Schools prohibited from contracting with sub-minimum wage providers for “transition services”.

36 Individual may not continue to be employed at subminimum wage unless:
Section 511: Limitations on Use of Subminimum Wage During Employment (Regardless of Age) Individual may not continue to be employed at subminimum wage unless: every 6 months for the first year of such employment and annually thereafter, the individual is provided by the designated State unit career counseling and information and referrals, and is informed by the employer of self-advocacy, self- determination and peer mentoring opportunities available in the local area from an entity that does not have any financial interest in the individual’s employment outcome.

37 Transition to WIOA and Key Implementation Dates
In general, the Act takes effect on July 1, 2015, the first full program year after enactment, unless otherwise noted. Title IV, amendments to the Rehabilitation Act, takes effect immediately. The State Unified Plans and Common Performance Accountability provisions take effect July 1, 2016. Notices of Proposed Rulemaking must be published by January 18, 2015 (no more than 180 days after enactment). Final Rules must be published by January 22, 2016 (no more than 18 months after enactment). Aggressive statutorily-required implementation timeline. For example, the Advisory Council on improving competitive integrated employment for individuals with disabilities must be established by September 20, 2014 (no more than 60 days after enactment).

38 Transition to WIOA and Key Implementation Dates
States can spend no more than 2% of PY 2014 allotment for transition activities. Of that amount, not less than 50% is to be made available to local entities for those activities. The Department anticipates issuing further guidance on the use of PY funds for this purpose shortly. ETA will develop process and guidance for States that choose to voluntarily submit and implement the WIOA Unified Strategic Plans before the statutory required date of July 1, 2016. ETA and VETS are analyzing WIOA effects to the JVSG programs. ** In particular, JVSG may be affected through changes in the performance measures and collapse of core and intensive services to career services.

39 WIOA Technical Assistance Tools and Resources
Department of Labor WIOA Resource Page (www.doleta.gov/WIOA) WIOA Dedicated Department of Education Office of Career, Technical, and Adult Education’s WIOA Resource Page (www.ed.gov/AEFLA) Rehabilitation Services Administration’s WIOA Resource Page (http://www2.ed.gov/about/offices/list/osers/rsa/wio a-reauthorization.html)

40 ODEP & NCWD/Youth Resources
National Collaborative on Workforce and Disability for Youth The “Guideposts for Success,” a research-based policy and practice framework that delineates what all youth, including those with disabilities, need to succeed, Guideposts focused on serving youth, including those with disabilities, in specific populations: in foster care, In juvenile justice system, youth.info/guideposts/juvenile-justice youth with mental health needs, youth.info/guideposts/mental-health, and, youth with learning disabilities, youth.info/guideposts/learning-disabilities

41 ODEP & NCWD/Youth Resources
Career Planning Begins with Assessment: A Guide for Professionals Serving Youth with Educational and Career Development Challenges, Individualized Learning Plans How-to Guide Paving the Way to Work: A Career Focused Mentoring Guide for Youth With Disabilities Skills to Pay the Bills: Mastering Soft Skills for Workplace Success

42 ODEP & NCWD/Youth Resources
Road to Self-Sufficiency: A Guide to Entrepreneurship for Youth with Disabilities, Everybody Learns, Everybody Works: Using Universal Design for Learning in Workforce Development Programs, Disability Inquiries in the Workforce Investment System 411 on Disability Disclosure

43 ODEP & NCWD/Youth Resources
Blazing the Trail: A New Direction for Youth Development and Leadership: Youth Call-to-Action paper/blazing-the-trail The Hidden Disabilities Quick Reference Guide, youth.info/assets/guides/quick_reference_guides/hidden_disabiliti es.doc. Professional Development: Knowledge, Skills, & Abilities (KSA). Innovative Strategies Database — dol.asp?exiturl=http://www.ncwd-youth.info/innovative- strategies&exitTitle=www.ncwd-youth.info 

44 ODEP & NCWD/Youth Resources
The following Innovative Strategies Practice Briefs provide examples of how various programs implement specific practices: Using Career Interest Inventories to Inform Career Planning briefs/using-career-interest-inventories-to-inform-career-planning Career Exploration in Action briefs/career-exploration-in-action Engaging Youth in Work Experiences briefs/engaging-youth-in-work-experiences

45 ODEP & NCWD/Youth Resources for Families
Career Development Infobrief: “Understanding the New Vision for Career Development: The Role of Family” The Guideposts: “The Guideposts for Success: A Framework for Families Preparing Youth for Adulthood” Work Skills: “Helping Youth Build Work Skills for Job Success: Tips for Parents and Families” Soft Skills: “Helping Youth Develop Soft Skills for Job Success: Tips for Parents and Families” Job Search and Retention: “Tapping into the Power of Families: How Families of Youth with Disabilities Can Assist in Job Search and Retention

46 Contact Information National Collaborative on Workforce & Disability for Youth Curtis Richards – Director, Center for Workforce Development Institute for Educational Leadership x163 Office of Disability Employment Policy

47 During the question and answer period of the webinar, the presenter mistakenly reported that all provisions governing the Vocational Rehabilitation Act went into effect immediately upon enactment of the new law. Most of the provisions went into effect immediately, including the requirement that 15% of VR funds be dedicated to serving transition0age youth. However, the provisions contained in Section 511 covering subminimum wage, sheltered employment placements do not go into effect for two more years. Congress clearly wanted to provide the vocational rehabilitation system, educators, and community based providers with adequate time to prepare for and establish alternatives to placing youth with disabilities in these sorts of job placements. The presenter deeply regrets any confusion or anxiety created by his inaccurate portrayal of the new federal law.

48 Correction During the question and answer period of the webinar, the presenter mistakenly reported that all provisions governing the Vocational Rehabilitation Act went into effect immediately upon enactment of the new law. Most of the provisions went into effect immediately, including the requirement that 15% of VR funds be dedicated to serving transition-age youth. However, the provisions contained in Section 511 covering subminimum wage, sheltered employment placements do not go into effect for two more years. Congress clearly wanted to provide the vocational rehabilitation system, educators, and community based providers with adequate time to prepare for and establish alternatives to placing youth with disabilities in these sorts of job placements. The presenter deeply regrets any confusion or anxiety created by his inaccurate portrayal of the new federal law.


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