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©Marian Small, 2011 When you can hear and speak, please click on the If you cannot hear or speak, please click on the Microphone On/Off There are only.

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Presentation on theme: "©Marian Small, 2011 When you can hear and speak, please click on the If you cannot hear or speak, please click on the Microphone On/Off There are only."— Presentation transcript:

1 ©Marian Small, 2011 When you can hear and speak, please click on the If you cannot hear or speak, please click on the Microphone On/Off There are only two for this room – we will share them

2 ©Marian Small, 2011 If you are having audio issues, please go through these steps: 1.Check that mic is not muted or turned down often volume control is on plastic piece on headset wire, volume and mute may be separate controls 2.Check that headset and speaker prongs are in the correct holes in your computer 3.Make sure that you do not have separate external speakers plugged in If you do, please unplug them 4.Check that internal computer volume is not muted Start  control panel  sound & audio devices 5.Go through Audio set up wizard in Elluminate Tools  audio  audio set-up wizard 6.If your head set was plugged into front of computer, try plugging it into back of computer (or vice versa) and repeat Audio set-up Wizard 7.Throw computer out the window ( haha kidding!! )

3 ©Marian Small, 2011 Professional Development Resource Developed by ERLC/ARPDC as a result of a grant from Alberta Education to support implementation

4 ©Marian Small, 2011 Overview of Elluminate

5 ©Marian Small, 2011

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10 Introductions Please tell us …. 1.Which math courses/grades you are teaching 2.What brought you here today. 3.Whether or not you’ve participated in an Elluminate meeting before. A = microphone B = chat box C = pass

11 ©Marian Small, 2011 Big Ideas Session 1

12 ©Marian Small, 2011 Alike and different Which pair of numbers are most alike? Vote for A, B or C. I’ll ask some of you to explain your thinking. A: 30 and 40 B: 55 and 155 C: 98 and 102

13 ©Marian Small, 2011 A big idea Classifying numbers helps us gain more insight into those numbers.

14 ©Marian Small, 2011 Big ideas are meant to… Help you as a teacher see what you are really going for.

15 ©Marian Small, 2011 Big ideas are meant to… Help you as a teacher see what you are really going for. Provide you with a teaching framework- to see how outcomes are connected.

16 ©Marian Small, 2011 Big ideas are meant to… Help you as a teacher see what you are really going for. Provide you with a teaching framework- to see how outcomes are connected. Give purpose to the activities you do

17 ©Marian Small, 2011 Big ideas are meant to… Help students build connections

18 ©Marian Small, 2011 Big ideas are meant to… Help students build connections Help students see the forest for the trees

19 ©Marian Small, 2011 The four sessions Session 1– A focus on number Session 2 – A focus on operations Session 3 – A focus on patterns and relations and statistics and probability Session 4 – A focus on shape and space

20 ©Marian Small, 2011 Let’s go back to.. The big idea about classifying in number.

21 ©Marian Small, 2011 Or maybe Which number doesn’t belong? Vote. I will ask some of you to explain your thinking. A: 6B: 18 C: 27 D: 90

22 ©Marian Small, 2011 Try this You are going to write a number the “regular” way, e.g. 34 or 2 or 619, etc.

23 ©Marian Small, 2011 Try this You are going to write a number the “regular” way, e.g. 34 or 2 or 619, etc. When you read the number, some of the words you say are: hundred, three, fifty, twenty, thousand, six What could the number be? Write some possibilities on the next screen.

24 ©Marian Small, 2011 hundred, three, fifty, twenty, thousand, six

25 ©Marian Small, 2011 Possible answers

26 ©Marian Small, 2011 What’s the big idea? What ideas did you see being brought out in that question?

27 ©Marian Small, 2011 What’s the big idea? What ideas did you see being brought out in that question?

28 ©Marian Small, 2011 Or try this (same big idea) You can use exactly 15 base ten blocks to represent a number. What could the number be? How do you know? List some possibilities on the next screen.

29 ©Marian Small, blocks

30 ©Marian Small, 2011 Maybe

31 ©Marian Small, 2011 Which of these would you find easier to count? Why? Vote for A or B.

32 ©Marian Small, 2011 A

33 B

34 B

35 Related How does this big idea relate to using tally marks? Raise your hand for me to call on you.

36 ©Marian Small, 2011 How could you represent 175 to show that: It is 7 groups of 25? Respond by drawing on the next slide.

37 ©Marian Small, as 7 groups of 25

38 ©Marian Small, 2011 The big idea is===

39 ©Marian Small, 2011 How could you represent 175 to show that: It is 25 short of 200? Draw on next slide.

40 ©Marian Small, is 25 short of 200.

41 ©Marian Small, 2011 I could ask: How could you represent 175 to show that it is 17 tens and 5 more?

42 ©Marian Small, 2011 How does thinking of 138 and 173 in terms of 150 help you decide which is greater? Raise your hands to respond.

43 ©Marian Small, 2011 How does thinking of 138 and 173 in terms of 150 help you decide which is greater?

44 ©Marian Small, 2011 A newspaper reports that about 150 people attended a meeting. Exactly how many people do you think that might be? Write a possible number on the next slide.

45 ©Marian Small, 2011

46 A newspaper reports that about 150 people attended a meeting. Exactly how many people do you think that might be?

47 ©Marian Small, 2011 Or List your two numbers on the next slide.

48 ©Marian Small, 2011 | 0

49 What fractions are modelled here? List some possibilities on the next slide.

50 ©Marian Small, 2011

51 Fractions

52 ©Marian Small, 2011 So how come… 2/3 of a set means the same thing as 2/3 of a whole?

53 ©Marian Small, 2011 So how come… 2/3 of a set means 2 ÷ 3

54 ©Marian Small, 2011 So how come… 2/3 of a set means 2 ÷ 3

55 ©Marian Small, 2011 So… Which is more: 2/3 or 3/5?

56 ©Marian Small, 2011 So… Which is more: 2/3 or 3/5?

57 ©Marian Small, 2011 Or… What fraction does the green pattern block represent? Raise your hand.

58 ©Marian Small, 2011 Or… What fraction does the green pattern block represent?

59 ©Marian Small, 2011 Could it be…? 1/6?

60 ©Marian Small, 2011 Could it be…? 1/3?

61 ©Marian Small, 2011 Could it be…? 1/2?

62 ©Marian Small, 2011 Could it be…? 4/5?

63 ©Marian Small, 2011 Could it be…? 4/5?

64 ©Marian Small, 2011 More and less A fraction is slightly less than 1/2. What might it be? How do you know?

65 ©Marian Small, 2011 More and less A fraction is slightly less than 1/2. What might it be? How do you know?

66 ©Marian Small, 2011 When… When might you change 0.25 to a fraction to multiply with it? Raise your hand to answer.

67 ©Marian Small, 2011 When… When would you definitely leave it as a decimal to multiply? Raise your hand to answer.

68 ©Marian Small, 2011 Which way? We know that decimals can all be written as fractions. When might it be useful to write fractions as decimals? When might it not be?

69 ©Marian Small, 2011 Big Idea

70 ©Marian Small, 2011 Comparing decimals Which is greater? How do you know? Is it 0.4 or 0.19?

71 ©Marian Small, 2011 Comparing decimals Which is greater? How do you know? Is it 0.4 or 0.19? Raise your hand to explain how you know.

72 ©Marian Small, 2011 Comparing decimals Which is greater? How do you know? Is it 0.4 or 0.19?

73 ©Marian Small, 2011 I am hoping that : you will try out one of the questions we discussed or, even better, your own question to bring out a big idea in number. We’ll talk about the results next time.

74 ©Marian Small, 2011 Survey Link You will be taken to the survey when you exit this session If you are unable to complete the survey at this time, please copy the survey link and you can complete the survey at your convenience. Thanks!


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