Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

National Mentoring Summit January 2013. Agenda Mentor Video Program Description Research Overview Key Findings Conclusions and Continual Improvement Lessons.

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "National Mentoring Summit January 2013. Agenda Mentor Video Program Description Research Overview Key Findings Conclusions and Continual Improvement Lessons."— Presentation transcript:

1 National Mentoring Summit January 2013

2 Agenda Mentor Video Program Description Research Overview Key Findings Conclusions and Continual Improvement Lessons Learned: Mentoring for Academic Gains Action Planning

3 Video: Be a Mentor

4 Program Model Afterschool, Summer, High School Placement 650 hours/year, hours in school Weekly academic mentoring Accelerated lessons, college trips, career exposure Positive culture and youth development approach

5 RCT Study Design $4 million over 7 years Four-year results published in 2013 By MDRC Two-year results and Summer Snapshot published in 2011 by P/PV Researchers test & survey: 4 summers and 3 school years + one 9 th grade follow up 50% accepted through lottery 50% assigned to control group Over 3 years (2006, 2007, 2008), 951 students & families apply and interview for 3 cohorts Only 2% of nonprofits have this “gold-standard” randomized research Randomized Control Trial (RCT) Study: funded by Wallace, WT Grant, Smith Richardson, Spencer, Atlantic Philanthropies, Bank of America

6 Randomization – in Brief 1. Hear about HA at school, neighborhood, etc. 2. Interview 99% - enter lottery. 3. Lottery 50% enter program: “treatment” “Treatment” Access to full program – may never attend. “Control” Never able to access program. But given list of other after-school & summer options Annual testing ($120 payment), surveys, Follow-up from researchers

7 Researchers Dr. Jean Grossman – Princeton University, P/PV, MDRC Dr. Leigh Linden – Columbia University, University of Texas- Austin Dr. Carla Herrera – P/PV

8 Outcome Measures Collected Hypothesis: - With high dosage and structure, Higher Achievement would have a measurable impact on academic outcomes and high school placement, by first impacting attitudes and behaviors. 2 key outcomes: – Standardized Test Scores – Application, Acceptance to, and Matriculation at Competitive High Schools Other outcomes of interest: – Behavior – Academic Attitudes – Perceptions of Peer and Adult Support – Participation in HA and Other OST Programs – Engagement in Academic Activities and High School-Related Activities

9 KEY FINDINGS

10 “Higher Achievement’s intensive year-round program had a significant impact on youth’s standardized reading and math test scores. ” “The longstanding Higher Achievement model is making a difference in the academic lives of motivated, at-risk students who could easily fall through the cracks.” Two-year follow-up study

11 No summer learning loss. Also - no impact on test scores, compared to control group, over the course of one summer: 2010 No summer learning loss. Also - no impact on test scores, compared to control group, over the course of one summer: 2010 High levels of attendance and retention, during tricky middle school years: 97% of summer participants also in after-school High levels of attendance and retention, during tricky middle school years: 97% of summer participants also in after-school Summer 2010 Snapshot

12 Four-year follow up study

13 Academic Impacts First- Year FU Second- Year FU Fourth- Year FU Math problem-solving *0.11* Reading comprehension † 0.04 * = Statistical significance.

14 Academic and Enrichment Activities Activity First-Year FUSecond-Year FUFourth-Year FU Treatmt (%) T-C Diff (%) Treatmt (%) T-C Diff (%) Treatmt (%) T-C Diff (%) Community service Presented ideas to a group out of school 636†6† 649*6911* Visited a college 7228**7328**7825** Read books out of school †8† Writing out of school 737* ** Visited a business *7014** Events with OST 7710**806†6† 849* Academic contests at OST 6813**6811**7116**

15 Conclusions Year-round, multi-year: high dosage yields results No effect after 1 year, only after 2 years: – Academic results take time Reading gains level with control group in 4-year follow-up: – Control and treatment made gains. Reading can be more self-directed. Math requires more instruction.

16 Continual Improvement Common Core Standards Alignment: – Curricula and Technology Explicitly teach writing skills Staff training to improve inference skills for reading comprehension “How Children Succeed” & Social/Emotional Skills – Piloted three assessments: PEAR HSA, SAYO, Gallup Student Poll + Grit Scale

17 Annual Operating Plan and Individual Work Plans, tied to Strategic Plan. Monthly Dashboard and Site Observation Discussions: National & Local Staff School Partners Quarterly Dashboard, linked to Financial Model Mid-Year Retreats: Org & City course corrections Update individual work plans Annual Retreat: Outcomes and RCT Results Continuous Improvement Cycle

18 Maximizing Mentors Orientation Ongoing mini-trainings Scripted lessons Nightly session feedback Monthly observations

19 One Mentor’s Perspective Ms. Liesa – Her involvement, academic gains of scholars – Mentor training and ongoing support – Best practices in academic mentoring

20 Table Activity– Think, Pair, Share! What are the goals for your mentoring program? What challenges do you have to meeting your goals? What resources do you have to meet your goals? What resources do you have to overcome your challenges? What support and/or trainings do you have to put in place to maximize your resources and meet the goals of your mentoring program?

21 ACTION PLANNING

22 "Whatever affects one directly, affects all indirectly. I can never be what I ought to be until you are what you ought to be.” - Dr. Martin Luther King


Download ppt "National Mentoring Summit January 2013. Agenda Mentor Video Program Description Research Overview Key Findings Conclusions and Continual Improvement Lessons."

Similar presentations


Ads by Google