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Mrs. Chawanna Chambers Sentence Variation. Warm-up—Unscramble the sentences 1a. to New York 1b. on April 10, 1912 1c. the Titanic left Southampton 1d.

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Presentation on theme: "Mrs. Chawanna Chambers Sentence Variation. Warm-up—Unscramble the sentences 1a. to New York 1b. on April 10, 1912 1c. the Titanic left Southampton 1d."— Presentation transcript:

1 Mrs. Chawanna Chambers Sentence Variation

2 Warm-up—Unscramble the sentences 1a. to New York 1b. on April 10, c. the Titanic left Southampton 1d. on her maiden voyage 2a. of paper 2b. without a word 2c. she took a piece 2d. out of her pants pocket 3a. and her children 3b. being a star in her own right 3c. she was well able 3d. earning twenty-five pounds a week 3e. to support herself

3 Warm-up Answers On April 10, 1912, the Titanic left Southampton on her maiden voyage to New York. Without a word, she took a piece of paper out of her pants pocket. Being a star in her own right, earning twenty-five pounds a week, she was well able to support herself and her children.

4 Four Main Sentence Types Simple Compound Complex Compound-Complex

5 Simple Sentence Contains only one clause Examples “Ice melts.” “The ice melts quickly.” “The ice on the river melts quickly under the warm March sun.” Use these sentences when you want to close an argument or grab the reader’s attention, but use them sparingly.

6 Compound Sentence Consists of two or more independent clauses joined together by a coordinating conjunction. Example Simple: Texas is a great state. It has a plethora of racial tension. Compound: Texas is a great state, but it has a plethora of racial tension. Use these sentences when you want to compare or contrast items or show a balance.

7 Complex Sentence Consists of one independent clause and at least one dependent clause. Clauses are not equal. Example Simple: Jessica finished her dialectical journal. She does not want to turn it in. Complex: Although Jessica finished her dialectical journal, she does not want to turn it in. These sentences show the reader which idea is most important. Dependent Independent

8 Compound-Complex Sentence Joins two complex sentences together with a semicolon OR joins a simple sentence and a complex sentence with a conjunction. Examples Simple and Complex: Jessica received an ‘A’ on the assignment, but the teacher struggled with the grade before she saw Jessica’s extra notes. Two Complex: Regardless of Jessica’s worry, she turned in the assignment; after careful review, however, the teacher awarded her with an ‘A’. Simple Independent Dependent Independent Dependent Independent

9 Compound-Complex SENTENCE

10 Sentence Beginnings Adjectives Verbs Adverbs Prepositional Phrases

11 Adjective An adjective is a word that tells us more about the noun or a pronoun. An adjective describes or modifies a noun. (sour lemon; happy girl; clear sky.) -Begin with an adjective. Ex. Kind people go everywhere in life.

12 Verbs An action verb shows movement or action. Whatever you’re doing can be expressed by a verb. (walk, jump, skip, plummet, dive, follow) -Begin with a verb ending in -ed. Ex. Saddened, she grabbed the tissue and wiped her eyes. -Begin with a verb ending in -ing. Ex. Laughing, I waved her over to meet my puppy.

13 Adverbs An adverb is a word that tells how, where and when. An adverb usually tells us more about a verb or an adjective. (rather cold; goes outside; slowly walked) -Begin with a phrase that tells where (adverb). Ex. Outside the snow started to fall on the treetops. -Begin with a phrase that tells when (adverb). Ex. Tomorrow I will be going to Mrs. Hoover’s class! Hurray! -Begin with a phrase that tells how (adverb). Ex. Slowly, I crept through the door as to not get caught by the teacher.

14 Prepositional Phrase A prepositional phrase begins with a preposition (about, above, across, after, against, along, amid, among, around, at, atop, before, behind, below, beneath, beside, between, beyond, by, concerning, down, during, except, for, from, in, inside, into, like, near, of, off, on, onto, out, outside, over, past, regarding, through, throughout, to, toward, under, underneath, until, up, upon, with, within, without) and doesn’t include a verb. -Begin with a prepositional phrase. Ex. Without a doubt, I was ready for the Super Bowl. Before lunch, we are stopping by the Kellogg office.

15 Reference Megginson, David. The Structure of a Sentence. The Writing Centre. Retrieved 1 September 2010.


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