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Take Advantage of Open Access Increased Impact, Control and Convenience HSLS Lunch with a Librarian February 9, 2012 Andrea Ketchum MLIS AHIP Health Sciences.

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Presentation on theme: "Take Advantage of Open Access Increased Impact, Control and Convenience HSLS Lunch with a Librarian February 9, 2012 Andrea Ketchum MLIS AHIP Health Sciences."— Presentation transcript:

1 Take Advantage of Open Access Increased Impact, Control and Convenience HSLS Lunch with a Librarian February 9, 2012 Andrea Ketchum MLIS AHIP Health Sciences Library System University of Pittsburgh

2 1.Open Access Overview 1.Definition 2.Evolution of Open Access 2.Advantages 3.Tools for selecting a journal and managing your work 4.Convenience

3 Open access is digital, online, free of charge, and free of most copyright and licensing restrictions. Definition: Open Access 1.Publish in Open Access Journals Free full text to all readers immediately Popular business model: “Author-pays” (usually paid by funder) Sometimes FREE!! Check each journal. 2.Deposit a copy in a Repository Free full text to all readers immediately, but might not be.pdfs Examples PubMed Central – required under NIH Public Access Policy Institutional, such as Pitt’s own Searchable globally via Google, other search engines 2 Main Ways to Accomplish:

4 Evolution of Open Access 400 years later… 1665: Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society of London Now available in print! Printing Press and Paper WWW, Internet Access and Electronic Publishing Old Books 2 by D’Arcy Norman 2007.Creative Commons Attribution license: Philosophical Transactions of The Royal Society A By dullhunk Creative Commons Attribution license: Delivery of Medical Journals 2012: Philosophical Transactions Now available online! The same volume can be shared by all Limited access, limited time

5 Scholars research and write articles with no payment from publisher. Publishers manage manuscript publication process and disseminate the research. The understanding 1665 – now? Other scholars peer-review those articles with no payment from publisher. Readers pay to read via subscriptions. University of Pittsburgh Center for Vaccine Research Photo “Big by Damo1977, used under Creative Commons license :

6 The understanding ?? Publishers promote authors and their research Scholars provide original, well-written research articles In exchange, publishers receive money. In exchange, scholar-authors receive good reputation, tenured positions. Print journals were purchased by individuals or libraries, where patrons could read and make copies of articles if needed. Print issues were owned by the library & available to library patrons. Equilibrium

7 “Crisis in Scholarly Communication” Skyrocketing journal prices Cancelled subscriptions Book budgets decimated Reduced access to all *Remember –Libraries may not always include back issues in their subscriptions, and may not keep what they have already paid for once a subscription [license] ends. Journals

8 Examples of annual library subscriptions (2012 prices) $30,860 Journal of Comparative Neurology (Wiley) $24,047 Brain Research (Elsevier) $20,269 Tetrahedron (Elsevier) $11,444 Gene (Elsevier) $10,840 International Journal of Pharmaceutics (Elsevier)

9 Publishers promote authors and their research, profits up 29-38%* Scholars provide original, well-written research. FREE *Dorsey ER, George BP, Dayoub EJ, Ravina BM. Finances of the publishers of the most highly cited US medical journals. Journal of the Medical Library Association: JMLA [Internet]. 2011;99(3):255. The New Reality: Disequilibrium Note: Universities and institutions use established publisher metrics (impact factors) for tenure and promotion decisions.

10 From The Right to Research Coalition Note: Publishers pay book authors for content --> Stephen King, JK Rowling… Publishers do NOT pay acad jrnl authors for content

11 We need a new model Electronic delivery has changed information delivery & use This is not about ideology anymore. It’s about creating the best, most efficient mechanisms for getting research to those who need it.” Cameron Neylon, Science and Technology Facilities Council UK November 11, 2011 Berlin 9 Open Access Conference Washington, D.C. Photo “Big by Damo1977, used under Creative Commons license : University of Pittsburgh Center for Vaccine Research

12 Goal: overturn the NIH Public Access Policy December 2011

13 Research Works Act (RWA) aka H.R “To ensure the continued publication and integrity of peer-reviewed research works by the private sector.” No Federal agency may adopt, implement, maintain, continue, or otherwise engage in any policy, program, or other activity that-- (1) causes, permits, or authorizes network dissemination of any private-sector research work without the prior consent of the publisher of such work; or (2) requires that any actual or prospective author, or the employer of such an actual or prospective author, assent to network dissemination of a private-sector research work.

14 Monday 29 August 2011

15 An Academic rebels 1.It charges very high prices — so far above the average that it seems quite extraordinary that they can get away with it. 2.One method that they have for getting away with it is a practice known as “bundling.” 3.If libraries attempt to negotiate better deals, Elsevier is ruthless about cutting off access to all their journals. 4.Elsevier supports many of the measures, such as the Research Works Act, that attempts to roll back the NIH Public Access Policy and Open Access in general. Elsevier — my part in its downfall Tim Gowers, Gowers’s Weblog, January 21, 2012 “It might seem inexplicable that this situation has been allowed to continue.”

16 Scholars withholding content from Tim Gowers and Tyler Neylon Updates: 1/30/2012: 1,603 2/1/2012: 2,782 2/2/2012: 3,193 2/3/2012: 3,461 2/7/2012: 4,434 2/9/2012: 4,913

17 Open access is digital, online, free of charge, and free of most copyright and licensing restrictions. AND Open access is about creating a more efficient way to get medical research to those who need it. Update Definition of Open Access

18 How can Open Access help you? Impact – Increased readership and citation Control – Use your articles in class – Share freely with colleagues – Post on your Web site – Reuse in subsequent work Convenience – No more ordering and waiting for articles from Document Delivery – No more doing without! – Share your articles via permanent links from Repositories

19 Citation and Impact Does Open Access have a citation advantage? YES Medicine: % increase in citations when published in Open Access journals

20 Citation and Impact: consensus KEY REFERENCES - See also the Open Citation Project Swan Alma. The Open Access citation advantage: Studies and results to date Southampton, UK: School of Electronics & Computer Science, University of Southampton Gaulé P, Maystre N. Getting cited: Does open access help? Research Policy 2011;40(10): Gargouri Y, Hajjem C, Larivière V, Gingras Y, Carr L, Brody T, et al. Self-Selected or Mandated, Open Access Increases Citation Impact for Higher Quality Research. PLoS ONE. 2010;5(10):e Eysenbach G. Citation advantage of open access articles. PLoS Biol May;4(5):e157. Epub 2006 May 16. PubMed PMID: ; PubMed Central PMCID: PMC ; 1.Open Access(OA) increases visibility, thereby increasing citation. 2.OA advantage is statistically significant. 3.Authors tend to publish their best papers in OA journals. 4.OA especially enhances the impact of highly citable articles. 5.OA probably accelerates dissemination of research findings.

21 Citation and Impact Does Open Access have a citation advantage?? The Open Citation Project - Reference Linking and Citation Analysis for Open Archives Last updated 25 November 2011; first posted 15 September Connotea: Bookmarks matching tag oa.impact

22 Retain control of your work Traditionally, many authors automatically give their entire copyrights to the publisher, making the above impossible. RETAIN rights to your own work by Publishing in an Open Access journal Using an Author Addendum to retain the right to deposit a copy of your paper in your institutions’ repository and/or other activities. The NIH Public Access Policy requires that you retain the right to deposit a copy of your NIH-funded work in PubMed Central within 12 months. Your publisher must agree to this. Check your publisher agreement or insert the proper language. (See the HSLS NIH Public Access Policy page.) Would you like to Post your paper on your Web site? Use your paper in your classes? Send copies of your paper to colleagues? Reuse parts of your published research?

23 SPARC Author Addendum – Scholar’s Copyright Addendum Engine – Use to request permission to retain rights to your own work: just download, fill in, and attach to your publisher agreement. Author Addendum The publisher may agree or not, but you’ll never get an answer if you do not ask! A contract is an opportunity to negotiate.

24 How can you take full advantage of Open Access? Publish as “Open” as possible– shop around! – Use online tools to find an Open Access journal that meets your needs – Author fees vary, but many do not charge at all. – Remember: Author fees often paid by research funder Retain the right to deposit a copy in a Repository – Check publisher/journal copyright policy first! – (Pitt’s own!) or other – Some publishers permit this, but conditions apply versions, embargoes etc. – Publish in any journal, but attach an Author Addendum No charge! Just attach a copy of Addendum Read your publisher’s agreement first! Some journals already permit this without extra paperwork – see previous point

25 Selecting a Journal AUTHOR RIGHTS = AUTHOR RESPONSIBLITIES Take charge of your publishing decisions! Consider (Cost + Impact + Access)

26 OA Publisher # Journals and Author Fees PLoS Hybrids: $3,000+ Elsevier, Oxford U. Press and more Created using ManyEyes, an open visualization generator from IBM.

27 Impact Factor range

28 Open Access Journal Selection Flowchart subject search Ulrich’s Directory Narrow results w/ Open Access option Retain as many author rights as possible. Author Fees - NO Narrow results w/JCR option Search the Directory of Open Access Journals (DOAJ) for Author Fees and more Author Fees - YES Check Details – What is fee? Does your funder pay fee? Is it worth it? Check SHERPA/RoMEO for copyright policies Type “ulrich’s periodicals” into HSLS homepage searchbox, follow links to electronic version. Extra:

29 Tools for Selecting an Open Access Journal 1.Ulrich's Periodicals Directory 1.Access by typing full title into HSLS search box and selecting the electronic version from the results. 2.Subject search, narrow by features such as Open Access, Peer- Reviewed, Journal Citation Reports (does it have an impact factor?) 3.Note: only available to Pitt student, staff, faculty 2.Directory of Open Access Journals (DOAJ) – over 7,000 journals!Directory of Open Access Journals 1.Search or browse by subject all peer-reviewed Open Access journals in the world. (Also full text searchable!) 3.SHERPA/RoMEOSHERPA/RoMEO 1.Search for journal or publisher copyright agreement – review your rights before sending your manuscript. 4.ISI Journal Citation Reports (JCR) (only if greater detail needed) 1.From HSLS home page, type JCR into search box, select and hit Enter 2.Search for journal by publisher, subject, or journal title 3.Find Impact Factors for journals

30 Ulrich’s Directory Search for topic, then narrow results Open Access Journal Citation Reports

31 DOAJ Directory of Open Access Journals Publication Fee?

32 SHERPA/RoMEO

33 Repositories – a few words… Institutional – University of Pittsburgh: – MIT: – Harvard: DASHDASH Subject – PubMed Central Repositories are critical to Open Access. They are the online storage facilities for the free versions of research articles and other scholarly research materials. Repositories have standardized and interoperable search engines, making them easily searchable.

34 2 sides to a coin Deposit Contribute article to Repository Cite Increase your discoverability and citation count Preserve Preserve your work automatically Search Search thousands of global Repositories simultaneously Discover Find new authors, ideas Share Collaborate, share Put something in Get something out

35 Open Access Pitt HSLS: – Andrea Ketchum, HSLS Reference Librarian ; AskALibrarian on HSLS WebSite: University–wide resources: – Pitt’s Institutional Repository: – Open Access at Pitt:

36 Be Open to Open Access! Thank you for attending today’s Lunch with a Librarian Questions? Comments? Contact Andrea Ketchum MLIS AHIP Health Sciences Library System 200 Scaife Hall University of Pittsburgh

37 Bibliography (in order of appearance…) ARL Statistics , Association of Research Libraries, Washington, D.C. Dorsey ER, George BP, Dayoub EJ, Ravina BM. Finances of the publishers of the most highly cited US medical journals. Journal of the Medical Library Association: JMLA [Internet]. 2011;99(3):255. The Right to Research Coalition. Howard, J. At Open-Access Meeting, Advocates Emphasize the Impact of Sharing Knowledge. Chronicle of Higher Education: Wired Campus. Nov. 11, Research Works Act (H.R.3699) December 16, The Research Works Act: a damaging threat to science. Lancet Jan 28;379(9813):288. PubMed PMID: Fister B. Tiptoeing Toward the Tipping Point | Peer to Peer Review. Library Journal The Price of Information. The Economist. February 4, Worstall, T. Elsevier’s Publishing Model Might be About to Go Up In Smoke. Forbes. January 28, Dobbs, D. Testify: The Open Science Movement Catches Fire. Wired Blogs. January 30, Monbiot G. Academic publishers make Murdoch look like a socialist. The Guardian August 29. Gowers, T. Elsevier — my part in its downfall. Gowers’s Weblog. January 21, in-its-downfall/http://gowers.wordpress.com/2012/01/21/elsevier-my-part- in-its-downfall/ Gowers, T. The Cost of Knowledge. Swan Alma. The Open Access citation advantage: Studies and results to date Southampton, UK: School of Electronics & Computer Science, University of Southampton Gaulé P, Maystre N. Getting cited: Does open access help? Research Policy 2011;40(10): Gargouri Y, Hajjem C, Larivière V, Gingras Y, Carr L, Brody T, et al. Self-Selected or Mandated, Open Access Increases Citation Impact for Higher Quality Research. PLoS ONE. 2010;5(10):e Eysenbach G. Citation advantage of open access articles. PLoS Biol May;4(5):e157. Epub 2006 May 16. PubMed PMID: ; PubMed Central PMCID: PMC ; The Open Citation Project. Connotea: Bookmarks matching tag oa.impact SPARC Author Addendum. Scholar’s Copyright Addendum Engine. ManyEyes, an open visualization generator from IBM. Directory of Open Access Journals (DOAJ) (Note: search for journal titles + search full text individual journals!)http://www.doaj.org/doaj?func=subject&cpid=24 SHERPA/RoMEO. Directory of Publisher/journal copyright policieshttp://www.sherpa.ac.uk/romeo/index.php?fIDnum=|&mode=simple&la=en University of Pittsburgh Institutional Repository - MIT Institutional Repository: Harvard University Institutional Repository: DASH Lunch with a Librarian: Take Advantage of Open Access Andrea M. Ketchum MLIS AHIP Health Sciences Library System, University of Pittsburgh February 2012


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