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Ghazala Bhatti & Julie Greer June 2011 ESRC Seminar University of Southampton.

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Presentation on theme: "Ghazala Bhatti & Julie Greer June 2011 ESRC Seminar University of Southampton."— Presentation transcript:

1 Ghazala Bhatti & Julie Greer June 2011 ESRC Seminar University of Southampton

2 How do real schools work with diversity? What does it look like in the day to day life of children and their teachers?

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4 330 pupils Resourced provision for BESD Urban 38% SEN mainly homogenous socio economic background Slow change in the local population 2003/4 16 pupils from minority ethnic cultures, 9 whose first language was other than english 2005/6 33 pupils from minority ethnic cultures 24 whose first language is other than english pupils (17%)from minority ethnic cultures (9%) whose first language is other than english

5 First languages spoken at Cherbourg 33 children with english as a second or other language, 15 different languages Spanish Polish Thai Punjabi Chinese Portuguese Urdu Zhosa Zulu Tetum Shona Bengali Nepali Romanian Arabic

6 Cherbourg Primary School Core Values We’re here to learn! Aim:To enable everyone to succeed. We will do this by all working together to: Create a safe, exciting, learning environment Encourage the whole school community to keep learning Learn to make informed and fair choices Value each other and ourselves See ourselves as part of a community: Whether as part of our class, our school, our town, nationally or globally. Keep the Golden Rules

7 Recommendations for schools from the national schools’ Inspectorate, Ofsted, in 2005 For schools to ensure that: inclusion of race equality concepts in lessons should be seen as a normal part of effective teaching and learning local resources in lessons involving race equality, such as work by local black and minority ethnic writers, and in the history of local industrialisation, should be used to stimulate pupils. interest and learning.

8 Ofsted’s evaluation schedule of schools 2009 pupils’ cultural development as shown by their: understanding and appreciation of the wide range of cultural influences which have shaped their own heritage The evaluation schedule for schools April 2011, No willingness to participate in, and respond to, artistic, sporting and cultural opportunities interest in exploring, understanding of and respect for cultural diversity and the extent to which they understand, accept, tolerate, respect and celebrate diversity, as shown by their attitudes towards different religious, ethnic and socio-economic groups in the local, national and global communities.

9 Criteria to be evaluated as ‘outstanding’ against the grade descriptor for pupils’ spiritual, moral, social and cultural development Pupils think deeply about their own and others’ experiences and try to relate them to a clear set of personal values. They have a keen interest in ethical issues, act in a principled manner and understand the importance of reassessing values in the light of experience. The pupils resolve conflicts intelligently and seek consensus while accepting the right of others to hold different opinions and beliefs. They have a very good insight, based on first-hand experience, into similarities and differences between their own and others’ cultures and how these are constantly changing. They are open to new ideas, appreciate cultural diversity and challenge racism.

10 Diversity in Action Policy and practice – Equality Act 2010 Anti Racism – educative, restorative but explicit Reflecting our community and society Modelling and exemplifying attitudes and behaviours – Walking the Talk! Supporting pupils new to English or who communicate in more than two languages Attainment Recruitment Curriculum United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child Learning for al - Family Learning

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16 Diversity in Action Policy and practice – Equality Act 2010 Anti Racism – educative, restorative but explicit Reflecting our community and society Modelling and exemplifying attitudes and behaviours – Walking the Talk! Supporting pupils new to English or who communicate in more than two languages Attainment Recruitment – active and encouraging Curriculum – reflecting society, not tokenistic United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child Learning for all – Family Learning

17 John Hansard Zineb Sedira

18 Learn to sign week

19 “Give us, your children, a good today. We will in turn, give you a good tomorrow” Toukir Ahmet – Bangladesh UNCRC Conference New York 2002

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21 It is likely that children who feel respected will understand the importance of extending such respect to others and thus will be more likely to display rights respecting behaviours. In contrast, children who are told they have rights and yet constantly experience rights violations may well respond by developing a cynical attitude towards rights, making them less likely to display right- respecting behaviours. Therefore, if we are interested in raising children so that they are knowledgeable and respectful of the rights of others, it is vital that adults treat children in a rights respecting manner. Campbell and Covell 2001

22 Rights, Respect & Responsibilities Learning About Rights Learning Through Rights Teaching And Learning in a Rights Respecting School

23 Allow us to tell you what we are thinking or feeling. Whether our voices are big or small; whether we whisper or shout it, or paint, mime or sign it – listen to us and hear what we say. Right No. 13, adapted form Article 13 of the UN Convention on the Rights of the Child, illustrated by Nicola, aged 10

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27 Celebrating our centenary with an Edwardian Day and Street Party

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