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Cancer Statistics 2004 A Presentation From the American Cancer Society ©2004, American Cancer Society, Inc.

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Presentation on theme: "Cancer Statistics 2004 A Presentation From the American Cancer Society ©2004, American Cancer Society, Inc."— Presentation transcript:

1 Cancer Statistics 2004 A Presentation From the American Cancer Society ©2004, American Cancer Society, Inc.

2 US Mortality, 2001 Source: US Mortality Public Use Data Tape 2001, National Center for Health Statistics, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 2003. 1.Heart Diseases700,142 29.0 2.Cancer553,768 22.9 3.Cerebrovascular diseases163,538 6.8 4.Chronic lower respiratory diseases123,013 5.1 5.Accidents (Unintentional injuries)101,537 4.2 6.Diabetes mellitus71,372 3.0 7.Influenza and Pneumonia62,034 2.6 8.Alzheimer’s disease53,852 2.2 9.Nephritis39,480 1.6 10.Septicemia32,238 1.3 RankCause of Death No. of deaths % of all deaths

3 Change in the US Death Rates* by Cause, 1950 & 2001 * Age-adjusted to 2000 US standard population. Sources: 1950 Mortality Data - CDC/NCHS, NVSS, Mortality Revised. 2001 Mortality Data–NVSR-Death Final Data 2001–Volume 52, No. 3. http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/data/nvsr/nvsr52/nvsr52_03.pdf Heart Diseases Cerebrovascular Diseases Pneumonia/ Influenza Cancer 1950 2001 Rate Per 100,000

4 2004 Estimated US Cancer Deaths* ONS=Other nervous system. Source: American Cancer Society, 2004. Men 290,890 Women 272,810 25%Lung & bronchus 15%Breast 10%Colon & rectum 6%Ovary 6%Pancreas 4%Leukemia 3%Non-Hodgkin lymphoma 3%Uterine corpus 2%Multiple myeloma 2%Brain/ONS 24% All other sites Lung & bronchus32% Prostate10% Colon & rectum10% Pancreas5% Leukemia5% Non-Hodgkin4% lymphoma Esophagus4% Liver & intrahepatic3% bile duct Urinary bladder3% Kidney3% All other sites21%

5 Cancer Death Rates*, All Sites Combined, All Races, US, 1975-2000 *Age-adjusted to the 2000 US standard population. Source: Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results Program, 1975-2000, Division of Cancer Control and Population Sciences, National Cancer Institute, 2003. Men Both Sexes Rate Per 100,000 Women

6 Cancer Death Rates*, for Men, US, 1930-2000 *Age-adjusted to the 2000 US standard population. Source: US Mortality Public Use Data Tapes 1960-2000, US Mortality Volumes 1930-1959, National Center for Health Statistics, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 2003. Lung Colon & rectum Prostate Pancreas Stomach Liver Rate Per 100,000 Leukemia

7 Cancer Death Rates*, for Women, US, 1930-2000 *Age-adjusted to the 2000 US standard population. Source: US Mortality Public Use Data Tapes 1960-2000, US Mortality Volumes 1930-1959, National Center for Health Statistics, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 2003. Lung Colon & rectum Uterus Stomach Breast Ovary Pancreas Rate Per 100,000

8 Cancer Death Rates*, by Race and Ethnicity, 1996-2000 *Per 100,000, age-adjusted to the 2000 US standard population. † Hispanic is not mutually exclusive from whites, African Americans, Asian/Pacific Islanders, and American Indians. Source: Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results Program, 1975-2000, Division of Cancer Control and Population Sciences, National Cancer Institute, 2003.

9 All sites 356.2249.51.4 Larynx 5.7 2.42.4 Prostate 73.0 30.22.4 Stomach 14.0 6.12.3 Myeloma 9.2 4.52.0 Oral cavity and pharynx 7.9 4.02.0 Esophagus 12.2 7.31.7 Liver 9.3 6.01.6 Lung & bronchus 107.0 78.11.4 Pancreas 16.4 12.01.4 Small intestine 0.7 0.51.4 Colon & rectum 34.6 25.31.4 Cancer Sites in Which African-American Death Rates* Exceed White Death Rates* for Men, US, 1996-2000 *Per 100,000, age-adjusted to the 2000 US standard population. Source: Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results Program, 1975-2000, Division of Cancer Control and Population Sciences, National Cancer Institute, 2003. Site African American White Ratio of African American/White

10 Cancer Sites in Which African-American Death Rates* Exceed White Death Rates for Women, US, 1996-2000 *Per 100,000, age-adjusted to the 2000 US standard population. Source: Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results Program, 1975-2000, Division of Cancer Control and Population Sciences, National Cancer Institute, 2003. All sites198.6166.91.2 Myeloma6.62.92.3 Stomach6.52.92.2 Uterine cervix5.92.72.2 Esophagus3.41.72.0 Uterine corpus, NOS7.03.81.8 Larynx0.90.51.8 Liver & intrahepatic bile duct3.01.91.6 Pancreas12.98.91.5 Colon & rectum24.617.51.4 Breast35.927.21.3 Urinary bladder3.02.31.3 Soft tissue, including heart1.71.31.3 African American White Ratio of African American/White

11 African-American men White men African-American women White women Rate Per 100,000 Cancer Death Rates* by Sex and Race, US, 1975-2000 *Age-adjusted to the 2000 US standard population. Source: Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results Program, 1975-2000, Division of Cancer Control and Population Sciences, National Cancer Institute, 2003.

12 2004 Estimated US Cancer Cases* *Excludes basal and squamous cell skin cancers and in situ carcinomas except urinary bladder. Source: American Cancer Society, 2004. Men 699,560 Women 668,470 32%Breast 12%Lung & bronchus 11%Colon & rectum 6%Uterine corpus 4%Ovary 4%Non-Hodgkin lymphoma 4%Melanoma of skin 3%Thyroid 2%Pancreas 2%Urinary bladder 20%All Other Sites Prostate33% Lung & bronchus13% Colon & rectum11% Urinary bladder6% Melanoma of skin4% Non-Hodgkin lymphoma4% Kidney3% Oral Cavity3% Leukemia3% Pancreas2% All Other Sites18%

13 Cancer Incidence Rates*, All Sites Combined, All Races, 1975-2000 *Age-adjusted to the 2000 US standard population. Source: Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results Program, 1973-1999, Division of Cancer Control and Population Sciences, National Cancer Institute, 2003. Both Sexes Men Women Rate Per 100,000

14 Cancer Incidence Rates* for Men, US, 1975-2000 *Age-adjusted to the 2000 US standard population. Source: Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results Program, 1975-2000, Division of Cancer Control and Population Sciences, National Cancer Institute, 2003. Prostate Lung Colon and rectum Urinary bladder Non-Hodgkin lymphoma Rate Per 100,000

15 Cancer Incidence Rates* for Women, US, 1975-2000 *Age-adjusted to the 1970 US standard population. Source: Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results Program, 1973-1998, Division of Cancer Control and Population Sciences, National Cancer Institute, 2001. *Age-adjusted to the 2000 US standard population. Source: Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results Program, 1975-2000, Division of Cancer Control and Population Sciences, National Cancer Institute, 2003. Breast Lung Uterine corpus Ovary Rate Per 100,000 Colon & rectum

16 Cancer Incidence Rates* by Race and Ethnicity, 1996-2000 *Age-adjusted to the 2000 US standard population. † Hispanic is not mutually exclusive from whites, African Americans, Asian/Pacific Islanders, and American Indians. Source: Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results Program, 1975-2000, Division of Cancer Control and Population Sciences, National Cancer Institute, 2003. Rate Per 100,000

17 Cancer Incidence Rates* by Sex and Race, All Sites, 1975-2000 *Age-adjusted to the 2000 US standard population. Source: Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results Program, 1975-2000, Division of Cancer Control and Population Sciences, National Cancer Institute, 2003. African-American men White men White women African-American women Rate Per 100,000

18 Lifetime Probability of Developing Cancer, by Site, Men, US, 1998-2000 Source: DevCan: Probability of Developing or Dying of Cancer Software, Version 5.1 Statistical Research and Applications Branch, NCI, 2003. http://srab.cancer.gov/devcan SiteRisk All sites 1 in 2 Prostate 1 in 6 Lung & bronchus1 in 13 Colon & rectum1 in 17 Urinary bladder1 in 29 Non-Hodgkin lymphoma1 in 48 Melanoma1 in 55 Leukemia1 in 70 Oral cavity1 in 72 Kidney1 in 69 Stomach1 in 81

19 Lifetime Probability of Developing Cancer, by Site, Women, US, 1998-2000 Source:DevCan: Probability of Developing or Dying of Cancer Software, Version 5.1 Statistical Research and Applications Branch, NCI, 2003. http://srab.cancer.gov/devcan SiteRisk All sites 1 in 3 Breast 1 in 7 Lung & bronchus 1 in 17 Colon & rectum 1 in 18 Uterine corpus 1 in 38 Non-Hodgkin lymphoma 1 in 57 Ovary 1 in 59 Pancreas 1 in 83 Melanoma 1 in 82 Urinary bladder 1 in 91 Uterine cervix1 in 128

20 Cancer Survival*(%) by Site and Race,1992-1999 *5-year relative survival rates based on cancer patients diagnosed from 1992 to 1999 and followed through 2000. Source: Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results Program, 1975-2000, Division of Cancer Control and Population Sciences, National Cancer Institute, 2003. All Sites645311 Breast (female)887414 Colon & rectum635310 Esophagus15 9 6 Leukemia4839 9 Non-Hodgkin lymphoma574710 Oral cavity603624 Prostate9993 6 Urinary bladder836419 Uterine cervix736112 Uterine corpus866026 Site White% Difference African American

21 Relative Survival* (%) during Three Time Periods by Cancer Site *5-year relative survival rates based on follow up of patients through 2000. Source: Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results Program, 1975-2000, Division of Cancer Control and Population Sciences, National Cancer Institute, 2003. Site1974-1976 1983-1985 1992-1999 All sites505263 Breast (female)757887 Colon & rectum505762 Leukemia344146 Lung & bronchus121415 Melanoma808590 Non-Hodgkin lymphoma475456 Ovary374153 Pancreas334 Prostate677598 Urinary bladder737882

22 Cancer Incidence & Death Rates* in Children 0-14 Years, 1975-2000 19751980198519901995 Incidence Mortality Rate Per 100,000 2000 *Age-adjusted to the 2000 Standard population. Source: Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results Program, 1975-2000, Division of Cancer Control and Population Sciences, National Cancer Institute, 2003.

23 Cancer Incidence Rates* in Children 0-14 Years, by Site, US, 1996-2000 * Per 100,000, age-adjusted to the 2000 US standard population. ONS = Other nervous system Source: Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results Program, 1975-2000, Division of Cancer Control and Population Sciences, National Cancer Institute, 2003 SiteMaleFemale Total All sites15.4 13.8 14.6 Leukemia 4.9 4.1 4.5 Acute Lymphocytic 3.9 3.3 3.6 Brain/ONS 3.3 2.9 3.1 Non-Hodgkin lymphoma 1.2 0.4 0.8 Kidney & Renal pelvis 0.9 1.0 0.9 Soft tissue 1.0 1.1 1.0 Bones & Joint 0.8 0.5 0.6 Hodgkin’s disease 0.6 0.6 0.6

24 Cancer Death Rates* in Children 0-14 Years, by Site, 1996- 2000 * Per 100,000, age-adjusted to the 2000 US standard population. ONS = Other nervous system Source: Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results Program, 1975-2000, Division of Cancer Control and Population Sciences, National Cancer Institute, 2003. SiteMaleFemale Total All sites 2.8 2.3 2.5 Leukemia 0.9 0.7 0.8 Acute Lymphocytic 0.4 0.3 0.4 Brain/ONS 0.8 0.7 0.7 Non-Hodgkin lymphoma 0.1 0.1 0.1 Soft tissue 0.1 0.1 0.1 Bones & Joint 0.1 0.1 0.1 Kidney & Renal pelvis 0.1 0.1 0.1

25 Trends in Survival, Children 0-14 Years, All Sites Combined, 1974-1999 *5-year relative survival rates, based on follow up of patients through 2000. Source: Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results Program, 1975-2000, Division of Cancer Control and Population Sciences, National Cancer Institute, 2003. 5 - Year Relative Survival Rates * Age Year of Diagnosis 1974 - 76 1974 - 76 1992 - 99 1974 - 76 0 - 4 Years 5 - 9 Years 10 - 14 Years 1992 - 99

26 Tobacco Use in the US, 1900-2000 *Age-adjusted to 2000 US standard population. Source: Death rates: US Mortality Public Use Tapes, 1960-2000, US Mortality Volumes, 1930-1959, National Center for Health Statistics, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 2002. Cigarette consumption: US Department of Agriculture, 1900-2000. Per capita cigarette consumption Male lung cancer death rate Female lung cancer death rate

27 Trends in Cigarette Smoking Prevalence* (%), by Gender, Adults 18 and Older, US, 1965-2001 *Redesign of survey in 1997 may affect trends. Source: National Health Interview Survey, 1965-2001, National Center for Health Statistics, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 2003. Men Women

28 Trends in per capita cigarette consumption for selected states and the average consumption across all states, 1980- 2001 United States Massachusetts California Data from: Orzechowski W, Walker RC. The tax burden on tobacco: historical compilation 2001: impact and opportunity, Volume 36. Arlington (VA): Orzechowski and Walker; 2001. Reprinted with permission. Source: Weir et al. Annual report to the nation on the status of cancer, 1975-2000, featuring the uses of surveillance data for cancer prevention and control. J Natl Cancer Inst 2003; 95:1276-1299

29 Current* Cigarette Smoking Prevalence (%), by Gender and Race/Ethnicity, High School Students, US, 1991-2001 *Smoked cigarettes on one or more of the 30 days preceding the survey. Source: Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance System, 1991, 1995, 1997, 1999, 2001, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 2002.

30 Note: Data from participating states and the District of Columbia were aggregated to represent the United States. Source: Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System CD-ROM (1984-1995, 1996, 1998) and Public Use Data Tape (2000), National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1997, 1999, 2000, 2001. Trends in Consumption of Five or More Recommended Vegetable and Fruit Servings for Cancer Prevention, Adults 18 and Older, US, 1994-2002

31 Trends in Leisure-Time Physical Activity Prevalence (%), by Educational Attainment, Adults 18 and Older, US, 1992-2002 Note: Data from participating states and the District of Columbia were aggregated to represent the United States. Educational attainment is for adults 25 and older. Source: Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System CD-ROM (1984-1995, 1996, 1998) and Public Use Data Tape (2000), National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1997, 1999, 2000, 2001. Adults with less than a high school education All adults

32 Trends in Overweight* Prevalence, Children and Adolescents, by Age Group (%), US, 1971-2000 *Overweight is defined as at or above the 95 th percentile for body mass index by age and sex based on reference data. Source: National Health Examination Survey 1960-1962, National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, 1971-1974, 1976-1980, 1988-1994, 1999-2000, National Center for Health Statistics, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 2002.

33 Trends in Obesity* Prevalence (%), By Gender, Adults Aged 20 to 74, US, 1960-2000 *Obesity is defined as a body mass index of 30 kg/m 2 or greater. Source: National Health Examination Survey 1960-1962, National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, 1971-1974, 1976-1980, 1988-1994, 1999-2000, National Center for Health Statistics, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 2002.

34 Trends in Overweight* Prevalence (%), Adults 18 and Older, US, 1992-2002 19921995 19982002 Less than 50%50 to 55%More than 55%State did not participate in survey *Body mass index of 25.0 kg/m 2 or greater Source: Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, CD-ROM (1984-1995, 1998) and Public Use Data Tape (2002), National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1997, 2000, 2003.

35 Screening Guidelines for the Early Detection of Breast Cancer, American Cancer Society 2003  Yearly mammograms are recommended starting at age 40 and continuing for as long as a woman is in good health.  A clinical breast exam should be part of a periodic health exam, about every three years for women in their 20s and 30s, and every year for women 40 and older.  Women should know how their breast normally feel and report any breast changes promptly to their health care providers. Breast self-exam is an option for women starting in their 20s.  Women at increased risk (e.g., family history, genetic tendency, past breast cancer) should talk with their doctors about the benefits and limitations of starting mammography screening earlier, having additional tests (i.e., breast ultrasound and MRI), or having more frequent exams.

36 Mammogram Prevalence (%), by Educational Attainment and Health Insurance Status, Women 40 and Older, US, 1991-2002 * A mammogram within the past year. Note: Data from participating states and the District of Columbia were aggregated to represent the United States. Source: Behavior Risk Factor Surveillance System CD-ROM (1984-1995, 1996-1997, 1998, 1999) and Public Use Data Tape (2000, 2002), National Centers for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention 1997, 1999, 2000, 2000, 2001,2003. Women with less than a high school education Women with no health insurance All women 40 and older

37 Screening Guidelines for the Early Detection of Cervical Cancer, American Cancer Society 2003  Screening should begin approximately three years after a women begins having vaginal intercourse, but no later than 21 years of age.  Screening should be done every year with regular Pap tests or every two years using liquid-based tests.  At or after age 30, women who have had three normal test results in a row may get screened every 2-3 years. However, doctors may suggest a woman get screened more if she has certain risk factors, such as HIV infection or a weakened immune system.  Women 70 and older who have had three or more consecutive Pap tests in the last ten years may choose to stop cervical cancer screening.  Screening after a total hysterectomy (with removal of the cervix) is not necessary unless the surgery was done as a treatment for cervical cancer.

38 Trends in Recent* Pap Test Prevalence (%), by Educational Attainment and Health Insurance Status, Women 18 and Older, US, 1992-2002 * A Pap test within the past three years. Note: Data from participating states and the District of Columbia were aggregated to represent the United States. Educational attainment is for women 25 and older. Source: Behavior Risk Factor Surveillance System CD-ROM (1984-1995, 1996-1997, 1998, 1999) and Public Use Data Tape (2000, 2002), National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Center for Disease Control and Prevention,1997, 1999, 2000, 2000, 2001, 2003. Women with no health insurance Women with less than a high school education All women 18 and older

39 Screening Guidelines for the Early Detection of Colorectal Cancer, American Cancer Society 2003 Beginning at age 50, men and women should follow one of the following examination schedules:  A fecal occult blood test (FOBT) every year  A flexible sigmoidoscopy (FSIG) every five years  Annual fecal occult blood test and flexible sigmoidoscopy every five years*  A double-contrast barium enema every five years  A colonoscopy every ten years *Combined testing is preferred over either annual FOBT, or FSIG every 5 years alone.  People who are at moderate or high risk for colorectal cancer should talk with a doctor about a different testing schedule

40 Trends in Recent* Fecal Occult Blood Test Prevalence (%), by Educational Attainment and Health Insurance Status, Adults 50 Years and Older, US, 1997-2002 *A fecal occult blood test within the past year. Note: Data from participating states and the District of Columbia were aggregated to represent the United States. Source: Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System CD-ROM (1996-1997, 1999) and Public Use Data Tape (2001, 2002), National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and Prevention, 1999, 2000, 2002, 2003.

41 Trends in Recent* Flexible Sigmoidoscopy Prevalence (%), by Educational Attainment and Health Insurance Status, Adults 50 Years and Older, US, 1997-2002 *A flexible sigmoidoscopy or colonoscopy within the past five years. Note: Data from participating states and the District of Columbia were aggregated to represent the United States. Source: Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System CD-ROM (1996-1997, 1999) and Public Use Data Tape (2001, 2002), National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and Prevention, 1999, 2000, 2002, 2003.

42 Screening Guidelines for the Early Detection of Prostate Cancer, American Cancer Society 2003 The prostate-specific antigen (PSA) test and the digital rectal examination (DRE) should be offered annually, beginning at age 50, to men who have a life expectancy of at least 10 years. Men at high risk (African-American men and men with a strong family history of one or more first-degree relatives diagnosed with prostate cancer at an early age) should begin testing at age 45. For men at average risk and high risk, information should be provided about what is known and what is uncertain about the benefits and limitations of early detection and treatment of prostate cancer so that they can make an informed decision about testing.

43 Recent* Prostate-Specific Antigen (PSA) Test Prevalence (%), by Educational Attainment and Health Insurance Status, Men 50 Years and Older, US, 2001-2002 *A prostate-specific antigen (PSA) test within the past year. Note: Data from participating states and the District of Columbia were aggregated to represent the United States. Source: Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System Public Use Data Tape (2001, 2002), National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and Prevention,, 2002, 2003.

44 Recent* Digital Rectal Examination (DRE) Prevalence (%), by Educational Attainment and Health Insurance Status, Men 50 Years and Older, US, 2001-2002 *A digital rectal examination (DRE) within the past year. Note: Data from participating states and the District of Columbia were aggregated to represent the United States. Source: Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System Public Use Data Tape (2001, 2002), National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and Prevention,, 2002, 2003.

45 Thank you


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