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IGERT: Sustainable Urban Infrastructure Anu Ramaswami, Program Director College of Engineering John Brett, Health & Behavioral Sciences Debbi Main, Family.

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Presentation on theme: "IGERT: Sustainable Urban Infrastructure Anu Ramaswami, Program Director College of Engineering John Brett, Health & Behavioral Sciences Debbi Main, Family."— Presentation transcript:

1 IGERT: Sustainable Urban Infrastructure Anu Ramaswami, Program Director College of Engineering John Brett, Health & Behavioral Sciences Debbi Main, Family Medicine Brian Muller, College of Architecture & Planning Paul Teske, School of Public Affairs University of Colorado Denver

2 Quick View of Sustainability: The Three E’s Economic Environment Equity (Social) The sweet spot in the middle represents sustainable alternative futures

3 Why Urban Sustainability? The U.S. Census Bureau predicts a world population of approx. 9 billion by the year 2050 Urban Areas will see most of this growth For the first time in the history of humankind, more people will be living in urban areas than in rural

4 Can we achieve urban sustainability?

5 Issues in Energy Inefficient Use of Energy Pollution from Energy Conversion –Air pollution, Smog –Mercury –Greenhouse Gas Emissions/Climate –Renewable Alternatives Vulnerability to Foreign Oil Economic Impact Environment Economic Impact, Jobs Social Impact, Equity

6 US Energy Picture Consumption will continue to ‘grow’ (~1.1% annually projected over next 30 yrs) Current annual primary energy consumption = 100 quadrillion BTU (Quad = )

7 Energy Security: US Oil Imports implications and projections 55% of petroleum used in the US is imported, that number is predicted to increase to 68% by 2025 without major changes in US petroleum consumption Is our oil supply vulnerable?

8 Environment - The Princeton Wedge: Routes to Carbon Stabilization at 500 ppm

9 Efficiency Transport mode shifts Pricing & taxes City design & lifestyle Other petroleum fuels, gas, GTL Other fuels, coal to oil, biofuels Deprivation and war By 2030, the gap is likely to be 6,000 nuclear reactors wide and growing at 500 nuclear reactors a year. [This shows the magnitude of the gap, and is not a suggestion of a solution] Oil and Energy Security Figure from Bruce Robinson, Sustainable Transport Coalition, Perth, AU Technology Module Planning Mod Policy Module Behavior Module

10 Sustainability Challenge No single path, no silver bullet Context and region is important –E.g., water needs for biofuels Unintended consequences –Food versus fuel debate, Pb vs GHG Scale-up issues important –Battery use if all cars are electric Public Engagement Needed –Efficiency, Conservation, Wind Sites, CCS, Water Reuse

11 Systems Tools Needed Life Cycle Assessment –Environmental Impact over life cycle Material Flow Analysis –Critical materials shortage globally Carbon Accounting –Good accounting principles, benchmarking Decision Support Tools –Trade-off between money, pollutants, etc. Multi-Criteria Decision Analysis –Values explicit, policy applications Public Engagement and Communication

12 Example: Role of LCA

13 Water scarcity in 2030 based on the Falkenmark Indicator

14 Global Withdrawal-to-Availability Vulnerability

15 Example: Decision-Support for Cities LCA-MFA Benchmarking Decision-Support Communication/Engagement

16 Per Capita emissions = 25.3 mtCO2e / person Buildings/Facilities Energy Use (Blues) = 52%; Transportation Tail Pipe Emissions (Red) = 30%; Embodied Energy of Key Urban Materials (Grey) =18% Using LCA and MFA for Visualizing and Benchmarking a City’s Carbon Footprint: Ramaswami et al., ES&T, 2008

17 Benchmarking: Comparison w/ National, State and Other City Data Denver Per Capita GHG Emissions (mtCO 2 e/person) National, State & other Cities Per Capita GHG Emissions (mtCO 2 e/person) Direct energy use plus airline travel and key urban materials Denver: 25.3 National; State: 25; 25.5 Direct energy use (no airline travel, no fuel refining, no production of concrete, food and food packaging) Denver: 18.9 Other Colorado cities 18.4 – 19.6

18 Denver’s Climate Action Planning GHG Per Capita Emissions “2011 Business As Usual”: 15.4 million mtCO 2 e Greenprint 2011: 13.7 million mtCO 2 e Greenprint Goal: 22.7 mtCO 2 e per person Denver 1990: 11.8 million mtCO 2 e Kyoto = 11.0 million tonnes

19 Public Engagement and Communication Participation Rates in Efficiency & Conservation Free Items (CFL) ~50% (Seattle City Light) First Cost Items >$500 Typically <5% Mandated Efficiency >95% (Berkeley, TOS)

20 Public Engagement and Communication Acceptance of Technology Implementation Water INDIRECT Reuse stalled by Toilet-to-Tap Campaign

21 Cross Disciplinary IGERT Curriculum Core Sequence of Four Courses (Certificate TBD) –Sustainable Urban Infrastructure & Development [AR] –Defining and Measuring Sustainability [ENGR, HBS] –Planning & Policy for Sustainability [CAP, SPA] –Sustainable Infrastructure Design [ENGR, CAP] Discipline-Specific Requirements for MS and PhD Field Work / International Experience

22 IGERT Fieldwork Partners City & County of Denver Indian Institute of Technology – Madras, Chennai, India Parallel Sustainable Infrastructure Assessments in Denver and Chennai


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