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Welcome to the Upper School Information e-Booklet

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1 Welcome to the Upper School Information e-Booklet
Explains the options process. Important Dates and deadlines Subject implications of the Government Initiative How the curriculum works at Shirley High School Information on all the different courses studied at KS4; Core and Option Choices Information and link to the Application Form Contact Us About The Options Process The Timeline The English Baccalaureate The Curriculum Subject Pages Application Contact This e-booklet will provide all students and parents/carers with information about everything studied in the Upper School at Shirley High School. It also has all the information required to make fully informed choices about what subjects to study next year and through to the end of year 11, how the application process works and answers some of the most FAQs.

2 English Baccalaureate
The Options Process Previous Page The Timeline Home The EBacc Subject Pages FAQs Next Page Application Contact us About The Curriculum About The Options Process The Options Process can be a daunting one for some students. This e-booklet is designed to give you as much information as possible about the process and the option subjects. Our aim is that by using this e-booklet you will have all the information you need to make fully informed choices regarding the subjects you will be studying for the next three years. If you are unsure about anything please do visit the FAQs pages and if your question is still not answered please do not hesitate to contact the school. The Process Come to our Options Evening at the school on Tuesday 28th April The evening will commence at 17:00hrs where there will be an information talk in the main hall and a market place for the option subjects. During the evening you will also receive your unique logon username and password for the on-line application form. For information regarding the on-line application form please visit the page. Decide if the English Baccalaureate is right for you. Please visit the f page for more information. Decide which subjects you would like to study. For more information on every option subject please navigate to the Rank them in preference order. Read the process carefully. Log on to the application form using your unique logon username and password. Complete the application form deciding whether the EBacc route is for you. The application window is open between Tuesday 28th April and Tuesday 5th May 2015 Forms analysed and students placed in subjects. Subject interviews may take place. July 2015 – students informed of subjects to be studied from September 2015. Application English Baccalaureate Subject Pages Application “Striving for Excellence” Exit

3 When Information e-booklet goes on-Line 04/03/15
The Options Process Previous Page The Timeline Home The EBacc Subject Pages FAQs Next Page Application Contact us About The Curriculum When Some important dates in the process Information e-booklet goes on-Line 04/03/15 Information Assemblies with HODs 25/02/15 – 22/04/15 (Students Only) Combined Y8 Parents’ Evening and Options Evening 28/04/15 (Parents/Carers and Students) The Application Window 28/04/15 – 05/05/15 Confirmation Letter July 2015 “Striving for Excellence” Exit

4 The English Baccalaureate
The Options Process Previous Page The Timeline Home The EBacc Subject Pages FAQs Next Page Application Contact us About The Curriculum The English Baccalaureate What is it? The English Baccalaureate (EBac) is a government initiative that measures students’ achievements in five specified subjects: English, maths, at least two sciences, a foreign language and an humanities subject (geography or history only). If a student gains a Grade C or higher in all five subjects then they will achieve the English Baccalaureate. Can I get an EBac at Shirley High School? Yes. All our students study English, maths and science and can choose either French or Spanish along with history or geography to give them the opportunity of gaining the EBac. If the EBac is for you then please use the ‘EBac’ route on the application form. The EBac at Shirley High School The English Baccalaureate at SHS Maths English 2 x Science Combined Science Triple Language French Spanish Humanities Geography History Any Other subject Do I have to study for an EBac? No. Our curriculum allows freedom to choose any combination of subjects from our subject pages if the EBac is not for you. If you decide to go down this route then please use the ‘Open Option’ route on the application form. “Striving for Excellence” Exit

5 The Curriculum The Options Process Exit “Striving for Excellence”
Previous Page The Timeline Home The EBacc Subject Pages FAQs Next Page Application Contact us About The Curriculum The Curriculum The KS4 Curriculum is designed to be as broad and balanced as possible while still giving students as much choice as possible. It is therefore centered around a specific combination of 8 subjects. The curriculum is designed to ensure that all students are as well prepared for the future as possible, including further and higher education and employment. Option Block 1 in the process has been designed with this in mind, ensuring that every student has studied the appropriate subjects to give them every possible opportunity for the future. The Eight Maths English Literature Language Any 3 from the EBacc subjects Sciences Triple Science Combined Science French Spanish Geography History 3 others Anything left over from English Anything left over from the 3 EBacc subjects Anything from the Option subjects Does my child have to study all the subjects in the EBacc? No, but there is one stipulation. If your child is currently in sets 1 or 2 for French then we do insist that they choose a language in their option choices. This can be either French or Spanish. A number of the top universities in the country insist that students have a GCSE in a language to even apply, so to give our students every chance of success in the future we ensure that our top set students continue with a language. If your child is currently in either set 3 or 4 for French then one of their options must be chosen from either French, Spanish, history or geography so that their curriculum remains as broad and balanced as possible. How does this affect the Options Choices? All students will have three option choices to study next year, alongside the core subjects listed below. Option 1 is chosen as explained above and shown below. For Options 2 and 3 we ask that students choose 4 subjects, from the list of option subjects, in order of preference. We will endeavour to give your son or daughter their first two choices but may need to use choices three and four if this becomes impossible due to timetabling reasons. All Students Study the Core Subjects of: Option 1 Option 2 Option 3 for French Sets 1 and 2 for French Sets 3 and 4 Mathematics English Lit. English Lang. Science Religious Studies Core PE PSHEE/WRL French Spanish Geography History Any Option Subject “Striving for Excellence” Exit

6 Subject Pages The Options Process Art and Design Business Studies
Previous Page The Timeline Home The EBacc Subject Pages FAQs Next Page Application Contact us About The Curriculum Subject Pages Please browse department areas by clicking on a subject on the Subject Page or scroll through using the Next and Previous Page buttons in the top bar. Art and Design Business Studies Child Development Computer Science Dance DT: Graphics DT: Resistant Materials Drama Food Preparation & Nutrition French Geography History Information and Communication Technology Media Studies Music Photography Physical Education Spanish The Core Subjects “Striving for Excellence” Exit

7 Art and Design GCSE The Options Process Exit “Striving for Excellence”
Previous Page The Timeline Home The EBacc Subject Pages FAQs Next Page Application Contact us About The Curriculum Art and Design GCSE Please browse department areas by clicking on a subject on the Subject Page or scroll through using the Next and Previous Page buttons in the top bar. The Course This course is suitable for students who are: Keen to develop their visual skills Creative, enthusiastic and imaginative Able to sustain an investigation Able to enjoy visits to galleries and museums and take part in workshops Willing to experiment and take risks in their work Willing to review their progress and make improvements. NOTE Students are required to attend extra Art sessions at lunchtime and after School. All students will need to contribute toward the cost of the sketchbooks Key Web Links: AQA - Art and Design BBC GCSE Bitesize Website- Art and Design Assessment AQA’s GCSE Art and Design is made up of two units: Unit 1: Personal Portfolio in Art and Design Internally set and marked; assessed through controlled assessment. Unit 2: Externally Set Assignment in Art and Design Externally set theme and internally marked. Both units are assessed using four Assessment Objectives. These can be summed up as: AO1 art history and critical understanding, AO2 ideas and materials, AO3 research and drawing, AO4 final image and making connections. Further Opportunities Students can progress to further education courses at level three such as: BTEC National in Art and Design GCE AS Art and Design During this course you will have built up a considerable portfolio of work that will support you in art related job opportunities and entrance to Art and Design courses at post 16. A variety of careers ranging from: Fashion Design, Architecture, Film, Video and Computer Animation, Illustration, Art Therapy and Interior Design. The possibilities are endless… “Striving for Excellence” Exit

8 Why Study Business Studies?
The Options Process Previous Page The Timeline Home The EBacc Subject Pages FAQs Next Page Application Contact us About The Curriculum Business Studies GCSE Please browse department areas by clicking on a subject on the Subject Page or scroll through using the Next and Previous Page buttons in the top bar. The course (AQA) By studying the GCSE Business studies course students are encouraged to; Actively engage in the study of business to develop as effective and independent learners and as critical and reflective thinkers with enquiring minds Use an enquiring, critical approach to distinguish between fact and opinion, build arguments and make informed judgements Develop and apply their knowledge, understanding and skills to contemporary issues in a range of perspectives of different stakeholders in relation to business and economic activities Consider the extent to which business and economic activity can be ethical and sustainable The topics covered provide a thorough foundation knowledge of Business Studies; Starting a Business, Marketing, People, Operations and Finance. Further Opportunities Businesses are part of our everyday lives; knowledge of how and why they operate is increasingly relevant to all students as you aim to enter the world of work. GCSE Business Studies also presents an excellent foundation to students who are considering studying the subject in Sixth Form and University. The course also appeals to those who have an ignited entrepreneurial spirit and aim to start their own business and become the next Lord Sugar. Assessment Assessment Objectives The pupils will be assessed on their ability to Recall, select and communicate knowledge. Apply knowledge in different contexts, plan and carry out investigations. Analyse and evaluate evidence and make reasoned judgements. Assessment Methods There are three components to the course: 1. Unit 1 - SETTING UP A BUSINESS – written examination (1 hour, 40% of marks) 2. Unit 2 - GROWING AS A BUSINESS – written examination (1 hour, 35% of marks) 3. Unit 3 - INVESTIGATING BUSINESSES – controlled assessment (25% of marks) Skills Students following the course will focus on improving the following key skills through the delivery of the course; • Communication • Application of Number • Information and Communication Technology • Working with others • Improving own Learning and Performance • Problem Solving. Why Study Business Studies? “Striving for Excellence” Exit

9  Back to Business Home Page
Do you plan on going to university? When your education is finished do you plan on getting a job?  Back to Business Home Page Next page  9

10  Back to Business Home Page
The latest figures show that youth unemployment is at its highest level since There are now more than a million unemployed year olds! Take GCSE Business Studies  Back to Business Home Page Next page 

11  Back to Business Home Page
Recruitment: You will know about the recruitment process and how you can stand out from other applicants Marketing: You will understand how to market yourself to potential employers by using the persuasive marketing tools & techniques businesses use Business Functions: You will explore the different functional areas of businesses allowing you to identify what job role or department you would most like to work within Finance: You will learn vital skills to do with monitoring finance – this will improve your knowledge on how to monitor income and spending (both in business & personal!) Production: You will analyse the most efficient ways of doing things – this will make you more capable in a work situation Your rights: You will learn about legislation and so will know what you are entitled to as an employee Management: When you progress to management positions you will be aware of the different techniques you could use to motivate your employees & achieve the best from them  Back to Business Home Page Next page 

12  Back to Business Home Page
Working to strict deadlines Exam preparation Research skills Writing to a high level of analysis Communication Organisation Team working The Business Studies GCSE covers a lot of the content you will experience at a higher level of detail in your first year of university on a Business related degree  Back to Business Home Page Next page  12

13 Business Studies & University...
Business, Business Economics, Business with Foundation, Natural Sciences (Business), Accounting and Finance, Accounting and Finance with Foundation, Business Finance, Business Finance with Foundation, Design Manufacture and Management Business and Management, Business and Enterprise Management, Business and Financial Management, Business and Retail Management, Business and Marketing, Business & Human Resource Management, Business Computing, Business & Operations Management, Business & Management with other subjects Business Studies & French/German/Spanish, Information Systems with Business Studies, Accounting and Finance, Financial and Business Economics, Financial Mathematics, Financial Mathematics with Management, Business Management, Economics and Business Management, Accounting and Computing Science, Accounting and Information Systems, Accounting and Mathematics, Accounting and Statistics, Business Accounting and Finance, Combined Studies (Accounting), Information Systems with Accounting Business Information Systems, Business Studies, Business with E-business, Business with Economics, Business with Finance, Business with Human Resources Management, Business with International Management, Business with International Trade, Business with Marketing, Business with Tourism, Computing for Business, E-business Management, Business with Maths/Engineering, Finance and Investment Management, Business Information Technology with Entrepreneurship, Business Management, Corporate Management, Information Technology Management for Business, Modern Language with Business, Accounting Business Computing, Business Information Systems, Business Studies, Business with Accounting, Business & Human Resources Management, Business & Marketing, Accounting and Finance, Business Management, Corporate Leadership & Management, Business with Accounting, Business Management (International) Business Studies & University...  Back to Business Home Page Next page 

14  Back to Business Home Page
Next page 

15  Back to Business Home Page
Do you plan on going to university? When your education is finished do you plan on getting a job?  Back to Business Home Page 15

16 FURTHER OPPORTUNITIES
The Options Process Previous Page The Timeline Home The EBacc Subject Pages FAQs Next Page Application Contact us About The Curriculum Child Development Please browse department areas by clicking on a subject on the Subject Page or scroll through using the Next and Previous Page buttons in the top bar. POINTS TO CONSIDER There is a lot of written work!!!! You must be prepared to be mature & sensible when covering some of the subject areas. You must have access to a child who will be younger than 2 years of age when you start this course in Year 9! THE COURSE The course covers the development and needs of young children from conception up to 7 years of age. Students gain an insight into the adult responsibilities involved in the caring for young children and the importance of providing a stimulating, secure environment. A variety of visitors come to the school to provide expertise for the students. Visits are made to allow students to examine issues in the real world. Information Technology will form an integral part of this course. FURTHER OPPORTUNITIES This course forms an excellent foundation for students who may wish to work in the ‘caring’ professions, e.g. nursing, dietetics, child care, education and occupational therapy. In Year 9 an overall view of the family, changes at puberty, play and safety, feeding a child and the responsibilities of caring for a new baby are explored. Also students work on the first part of their coursework – research tasks, based on a variety of topics studied in the syllabus. This is reviewed in Year 10 and finalised - 20% of the coursework out of the way! Students begin their Child Study during the last term in year 10 with a deadline of February half term in year 11. ASSESSMENT Assessment is un-tiered covering all ability ranges from A* - G i) A written examination 1hr 30 mins 100marks 40% of total marks ii) Coursework: Research Task 30 marks 20% of total marks Child Study 60 marks 40% of total marks “Striving for Excellence” Exit

17 Computer Science The Options Process
Previous Page The Timeline Home The EBacc Subject Pages FAQs Next Page Application Contact us About The Curriculum Computer Science Please browse department areas by clicking on a subject on the Subject Page or scroll through using the Next and Previous Page buttons in the top bar. The examination course students will follow is likely to be the WJEC GCSE in Computer Science (although the department retains the right to change exam board if it is felt to be in the interests of the students). All exam boards require students to cover the same topics, the only difference is the basis of the controlled assessment. Computer Science offers students the opportunity to gain a real understanding of the way computers work inside and to create computer programs that could be used for real-life purposes.  The course consists of 7 units: Unit 1: Computer Systems - Inputs, Outputs, Storage (memory etc), Processes (CPU) Unit 2: How data is represented in a computer (inc converting Denary to binary and hexadecimal and vice versa) Unit 3: Functions of Operating Systems Unit 4: Different types of networks Unit 5: Internet & Communications (html programming, compression, encryption etc) Unit 6: Algorithms Unit 7: Programming (including writing your own program using languages such as Python) How will I be assessed? At the moment students are assessed via 3 units (although this may change as of September 2016 to 80% Exam, 20% Controlled Assessment): Unit 1: Written Exam Paper – 1 ½ hours in length and externally marked by exam board - 45% Unit 2: Series of short tasks solving problems using computers - 2 hours in length and externally marked by exam board - 30% Unit 3: Controlled Assessment – 15 hours in length whereby students develop a piece of work using programming software following a task brief issued by exam board - 25% How do I know if I am suited to this course? This course is for the young person who thinks in a logical manner, has the resilience to keep trying and enjoys mathematical puzzles/problems. “Striving for Excellence” Exit

18 Click Here for Dance FAQs
The Options Process Previous Page The Timeline Home The EBacc Subject Pages FAQs Next Page Application Contact us About The Curriculum Dance GCSE Click Here for Dance FAQs Please browse department areas by clicking on a subject on the Subject Page or scroll through using the Next and Previous Page buttons in the top bar. The Course GCSE Dance is ideal for students who enjoy working in groups and on their own. Each week students participate in a double practical lesson and single theory lesson. Practical aspects of the course: For performance students will learn two solo dances, and create a group dance in response to a professional work. Students will also create solo and group choreographies exploring responding to a stimulus and developing material from one of the eleven set works. Theory aspects of the course: The set professional works prescribed by AQA are studied in detail. For this students examine how the works were created as well as how different production elements like costume, set and lighting contribute to the work. Students also examine the development of different dance styles, safe dance practice and a healthy lifestyle. Key Requirements Dancers must be prepared to appear in regular performance to build confidence and skill. All dancers are required in all black kit every practical lesson. Homework is set weekly and must be completed. Dancers are expected to be committed to rehearsals in their own time, including lunch and after school. Students are expected to be focussed and committed. Next Dance Page  “Striving for Excellence” Exit

19 Dance GCSE  Previous Dance Page The Options Process
Previous Page The Timeline Home The EBacc Subject Pages FAQs Next Page Application Contact us About The Curriculum Dance GCSE Click Here for Dance FAQs Please browse department areas by clicking on a subject on the Subject Page or scroll through using the Next and Previous Page buttons in the top bar. Further Opportunities GCSE Dance is the ideal course to lead into AS and A2 Dance in the Shirley High Sixth Form.  Shirley High has a strong partnership with the Croydon School’s Dance Association and offers regular opportunities for extra training and performance, including the chance to participate in the annual summer school, Dance Slam. GCSE Dancers perform in shows both at Shirley High and external venues, recently a group was involved in breaking the world record for the biggest dance class.  Students are also invited to coach younger years at Woodside Junior  school in the summer term. Clubs in various styles are offered free to all dancers and include technique classes in different styles, theory boosters and choreography classes. Key Web Links AQA Exam Board Some Set Works: Ghost Dances/Swansong Still Life at the Penguin Café Perfect Overdrive Rosas danst Rosas The Assessment Four Units Unit 1: Critical Appreciation A 1 hour written paper - 20% Unit 2: Set Dance A 1 minute solo performance - 20% Unit 3: Performance in a duo/group A 3-4 minute group dance - 20% Unit 4: Choreography 4.1 - Solo Composition Solo task based on a set work - 15% 4.2 - Solo/duet/group choreography Small group or solo dance in response to a stimulus - 25%  Previous Dance Page “Striving for Excellence” Exit

20 What style of dance do we do?
The Options Process Previous Page The Timeline Home The EBacc Subject Pages FAQs Next Page Application Contact us About The Curriculum Dance FAQs Please browse department areas by clicking on a subject on the Subject Page or scroll through using the Next and Previous Page buttons in the top bar. All black kit with no logos.  This should be appropriate to wear in a  mixed group and be comfortable to move in What kit will I need? What style of dance do we do? As GCSE Dance is a creative subject you often work on creating movement so can borrow from many styles, however you will be technically trained in Jazz, Contemporary Dance and Physical Theatre.  Dance Home Page “Striving for Excellence” Exit

21 DT: Graphic Products The Options Process Exit
Previous Page The Timeline Home The EBacc Subject Pages FAQs Next Page Application Contact us About The Curriculum DT: Graphic Products Please browse department areas by clicking on a subject on the Subject Page or scroll through using the Next and Previous Page buttons in the top bar. The Course The course encourages students to use a variety of graphical media and drawing techniques to produce designs. Three dimensional work in the form of model making, using different techniques and materials, e.g. card and plastics, will also form a part of this course. Information Technology will be used for Computer Aided Design (CAD). Assessment The course is assessed in two parts: i) Practical coursework (including folder) 60% ii) Examination % NOTE: Sometimes students will be expected to attend extra sessions after school on occasions. Further Opportunities The course provides an excellent foundation for students who may wish to work in, for example, some of the following areas: Graphic design for advertising, packaging, architecture, structural and civil engineering, publishing, media arts, interior design, display, theatre and film set design. “Striving for Excellence” Exit

22 DT: Resistant Materials
The Options Process Previous Page The Timeline Home The EBacc Subject Pages FAQs Next Page Application Contact us About The Curriculum DT: Resistant Materials Please browse department areas by clicking on a subject on the Subject Page or scroll through using the Next and Previous Page buttons in the top bar. The Course The course involves working with a wide range of resistant materials and theory work that will include:- Product design and manufacture; The use of specialist equipment and machinery; Health and Safety considerations; Information Technology will form an integral part of the course and students will have the opportunity to use CAD/CAM. Materials, tools, components and their uses. Further Opportunities This qualification is of value to those students wishing to study further in areas of engineering, product design, product manufacture, project management, teaching, or a practical career. NOTE: Sometimes students will be expected to attend extra sessions after school on occasions. Assessment The course is assessed in two parts:- i) Practical coursework (including Design Folder) 60% ii) Examination % There will be some cost implication for this course because of the materials used. “Striving for Excellence” Exit

23 Drama GCSE The Options Process The Course Next Drama page  Exit
Previous Page The Timeline Home The EBacc Subject Pages FAQs Next Page Application Contact us About The Curriculum Drama GCSE Please browse department areas by clicking on a subject on the Subject Page or scroll through using the Next and Previous Page buttons in the top bar. The Course This course is suitable for students who enjoy working collaboratively within the arts, whilst having a keen interest for exploring both theory and practical aspects of the subject. Practical aspects of the course: Students will experience a wide variety of theatre and performance opportunities. They will be assessed on both collaborative and independent performance. Students will explore how to devise performances from a stimulus using personal creativity and originality and work with script to perform complex and challenging roles. Theory aspects of the course: Students will study a vast range of theatrical genres and styles, with particular focus on key theatre practitioners/ playwrights and their influences on contemporary drama/ theatre. Students will critically analyse text and live performance, and be able to make informed judgements and observations through reflections and reviews. The course also explores, in depth, theatre history and theory. Next Drama page  “Striving for Excellence” Exit

24  Back to Drama Home Page
The Options Process Previous Page The Timeline Home The EBacc Subject Pages FAQs Next Page Application Contact us About The Curriculum Drama GCSE Please browse department areas by clicking on a subject on the Subject Page or scroll through using the Next and Previous Page buttons in the top bar. Key Requirements Students considering drama must have a keen interest in both the practical and theoretical aspects of the subject. Students must be prepared to work intensively and give up their own time to rehearse. Drama is an extremely demanding subject which requires dedication, focus, effort and commitment, which is required 100% of the time. The Assessment 2 Units Unit 1—Written Paper worth 80 marks = 40% Unit 2—Practical Work worth 120 marks = 60% Candidates are required to present practical work for two controlled assessment options (each worth 30%) Controlled assessment options: Devised Thematic Work Acting Improvisation Theatre in Education Physical Theatre Set Design Costume Make up Lighting Sound Stage Management Key Web Links Drama AQA The National Theatre  Back to Drama Home Page Next page  “Striving for Excellence” Exit

25  Back to Drama Home Page
The Options Process Previous Page The Timeline Home The EBacc Subject Pages FAQs Next Page Application Contact us About The Curriculum Drama GCSE Please browse department areas by clicking on a subject on the Subject Page or scroll through using the Next and Previous Page buttons in the top bar. So WHY GCSE Drama?  Back to Drama Home Page Next page  “Striving for Excellence” Exit

26  Back to Drama Home Page
Performance Partnership with the V&A  Back to Drama Home Page Next page  “Striving for Excellence” Exit

27 Work With Leading Theatre Practitioners!!
STEVEN BERKOFF Work With Leading Theatre Practitioners!!  Back to Drama Home Page Next page  “Striving for Excellence” Exit

28 Further Opportunities
GCSE drama provides a platform for anyone wanting to succeed creatively in future careers through the study of A Level Drama and Theatre Studies here at Shirley. The course structure and focus acts as a strong spring board onto a number of different careers, further and higher education, for not only academic aspirations but valuable life skills which relate to many areas and develop character. The course offers chances to visit numerous theatre productions in a variety of styles and settings. Experience workshops by leading theatre groups such as ‘Frantic Assembly’ and to use the expertise and techniques to perform in a fully equipped drama studio, site specific performances and at local platforms for performances.  Back to Drama Home Page Next page  “Striving for Excellence” Exit

29 Develop SKILL, Enhance Creativity…LOVE Performing!
The Options Process Previous Page The Timeline Home The EBacc Subject Pages FAQs Next Page Application Contact us About The Curriculum Drama GCSE Please browse department areas by clicking on a subject on the Subject Page or scroll through using the Next and Previous Page buttons in the top bar. Develop SKILL, Enhance Creativity…LOVE Performing!  Back to Drama Home Page “Striving for Excellence” Exit

30 Food Preparation & Nutrition GCSE
The Options Process Previous Page The Timeline Home The EBacc Subject Pages FAQs Next Page Application Contact us About The Curriculum Food Preparation & Nutrition GCSE Please browse department areas by clicking on a subject on the Subject Page or scroll through using the Next and Previous Page buttons in the top bar. THE COURSE The course equips students with the knowledge, understanding and skills required to cook and apply the principles of food science, nutrition and healthy eating. Students are encouraged to cook a wide variety of dishes, using a range of equipment, materials and ingredients to create high quality dishes. Students will develop a knowledge of nutrition, special diets, the main food groups, food provenance, culinary traditions, food choice and the scientific principles underlying the preparation and cooking of food. as well as and the social, cultural and environmental factors that affect food production. Where appropriate, visitors will come to the school to provide further information and visits will be made to allow students to investigate particular topics. Computers are used throughout the course as a tool for research, analysis and presentation of work. ASSESSMENT As yet, how this subject will be assessed has not been revealed. Discussion is ongoing between the government and examination boards. POINTS TO CONSIDER Although this is a practical subject, IT IS NOT JUST COOKING! THERE IS A LOT OF WRITTEN WORK!!!!! You must be prepared to plan your own practical work thoroughly, looking on-line or in recipe books to find your own recipe. You must be prepared to cook a range of different dishes and not only those that you like!! Recipes can be modified to accommodate students with special dietary needs – vegetarian, allergies etc. YOU WILL BE EXPECTED TO BRING INGREDIENTS AND A CONTAINER AND / OR DISH FOR EACH PRACTICAL LESSON. FURTHER OPPORTUNITIES A variety of career options are enhanced by undertaking the course, due to the development of managerial, investigative, creative and organisational abilities. Examples include positions in the food industry, retail management, marketing and market research, education, and product development. This course is also of great benefit to those interested in the caring professions, such as health workers or childcare. “Striving for Excellence” Exit

31 French GCSE The Options Process Core Subjects
Previous Page The Timeline Home The EBacc Subject Pages FAQs Next Page Application Contact us About The Curriculum French GCSE Please browse department areas by clicking on a subject on the Subject Page or scroll through using the Next and Previous Page buttons in the top bar. Future opportunities Having a GCSE in French is a benefit to most jobs, not just teaching, translating and interpreting. With the business world becoming ever more global and a vast amount of companies becoming international means when applying for a job having knowledge of a Modern Foreign Language is always an advantage. This course is also very popular with students who regularly holiday in French speaking countries to enhance their travel experience and to be able to communicate with the locals as well as understanding their culture and traditions. The Course In year nine students learn how to be able to talk about their interests and hobbies, regions in France and human rights all in French. Later in years ten and eleven students learn the topics healthy eating, leisure, holidays and the world of work as well as preparing for their controlled assessments Requirements Students will be expected to meet deadlines. Homework will be given on a weekly basis and will consist of worksheets, vocabulary tests and written tasks. This is an express course, as it is to be completed in only three years and therefore a huge amount of dedication and hard work is required by students wanting to take this course. Core Subjects “Striving for Excellence” Exit Exit

32 What kind of jobs can geographers do?
“Without Geography, you are no where” Michael Palin The Options Process Previous Page The Timeline Home The EBacc Subject Pages FAQs Next Page Application Contact us About The Curriculum Why Study Geography? Are you interested in understanding the world around you? Click here to watch this short film about why Geography matters. Geography GCSE Please browse department areas by clicking on a subject on the Subject Page or scroll through using the Next and Previous Page buttons in the top bar. What will you study in Geography at KS4? OCR Geography B Population and Settlement Natural Hazards Economic Development Rivers and Coasts Plus lots of skills based work such as map skills. What will your workload be like? You will get homework every week, but it will be varied. It will include written questions, worksheets, maps, diagrams and preparing presentations using ICT but it will also include watching short films on You Tube or watching geographical programmes on TV. You will have an extensive glossary of geographical words to learn and master over the three years! You will be advised which revision and workbook to purchase. You will have access to resources on Fronter including the main GCSE textbook. The examination process in Geography. All exams are taken in year 11. A 1 hour 30 minute decision making exam on one of the key themes. (25%) A Fieldwork investigation based on a trip to the coast. (25%) A final 1 hour 45 minute exam paper testing the remaining 3 key themes. (50%) To complete the fieldwork element of the course we run a trip to the North Norfolk Coast, where students get to experience fieldwork first hand and collect primary data. There is a cost for this trip as we spend three days away using the latest field and analysis equipment. The trip happens when students are in year 10 and will cost approximately £220 all inclusive. What kind of jobs can geographers do? To find out - click here “Striving for Excellence” Exit

33 What do Geographers do? Geographers can: Geographers are:
Is geography a good choice in terms of getting a job? The answer is a resounding YES! Compared to other subjects, geography graduates are among the most employable. They possess the skills that employers look for. In part this is because the subject combines a knowledge of science and an understanding of the arts. Geographers can: Geographers are: • make a concise report • handle data • ask questions and find answers • make decisions about an issue • analyse material • organise themselves • think creatively and independently • good communicators • spatially aware • socially, economically and environmentally aware • problem solvers • good team players • computer literate • well rounded, flexible thinkers NEXT PAGE 

34 Discover new places! Travel Agent Tourism Officer Eco-Tourism Advisor Tour Guide Media Researcher Fascinated by maps? GIS Specialist Cartographer Utilities Manager Remote Sensing Analyst Enjoy being in the landscape? Hydrologist Coastal Manager Geologist Civil Engineer Soil Conservationist Interested in world events? Aid Worker Diplomat Refugee Advisor Charity Coordinator Care about the planet? Estate Manager Forestry Ranger Environmental Consultant Pollution Analyst Conservation Officer Interested in human behaviour? Planner Social Worker Market Researcher Housing Officer Estate Agent Want to know why people work where they do? Economic Developer Location Analyst Retailer Regional Developer Transport Manager Interested in Weather? Weather Presenter Disaster Manager Flood Prevention Officer Risk Assessor Water Supply Coordinator Previous page  Back to Geography Home page that geographers do “Without Geography, you are no where” Michael Palin

35 How will History help me?
Choose GCSE History Click here. You tube The Options Process Previous Page The Timeline Home The EBacc Subject Pages FAQs Next Page Application Contact us About The Curriculum History GCSE Please browse department areas by clicking on a subject on the Subject Page or scroll through using the Next and Previous Page buttons in the top bar. What will I need to do? You must be prepared for a lot of reading and writing. You will look at different kinds of evidence and analyse it. Films, discussion and group presentations are important as you need to develop your own ideas about the past and be able to express them clearly. Home work is set weekly and must be done. Why study History? Things that happen in the world today are often the direct result of things that have happened in the past. The things you do, the rights you have, even the way you dress and the music you listen to are the result of people’s behaviour and decisions in the past. You will go on to help shape the future and some of the lessons of the past will help you to decide what sort of world you want for yourself and your children. What do we study? YEAR Britain First World War Russian Revolution Rise of Hitler USA Causes of WW2 and British Home Front End of the war How will History help me? The skills of analysis, debate and writing balanced answers which you will learn are important in many areas. If you think you might want to study subjects such as English Literature, Law, Sociology, Art, Drama or Politics historical background can be important. A good GCSE in History shows you are capable of thinking clearly, listening carefully and sharing ideas with others. What do we study: Year 10-11 We will be studying topics from these periods:- Medieval ( ) Early Modern ( ) Modern (1700-present day) This will be:- British, European and a wider world settings There will be no coursework More History Pages  “Striving for Excellence” Exit

36  Back to History Home Page
There are three areas where concrete answers will be essential before I make my decision about history: 1 What can studying the past do for me as a person? 2 Do employers value history? 3 Will I enjoy the content of the course?  Back to History Home Page Next page 

37 What is the point of studying the past?
How can that develop me as a person? Surely it’s the present that matters!  Back to History Home Page Next page 

38 When studying history you will:
Use information effectively – this can help shed light on a particular problem or issue confronting an organisation or individual. Weigh conflicting factors carefully before taking critical decisions. Be analytical and critical when considering information presented to you.  Back to History Home Page Next page 

39  Back to History Home Page
Understand how and why humans behaved as they did – and may behave in similar circumstances again. This can be vital in relations with the most complex factor in any job – your colleagues! Learn the arts of oral debate and expressing a clear personal point of view – invaluable skills at job or university interviews.  Back to History Home Page Next page 

40  Back to History Home Page
Studying the people of the past can give you real insight into people alive now. It will help you understand how and why humans behave as they do when confronted with the crises of today. Unless you become a lighthouse keeper or a hermit you’ll need to understand other people with all their complexities. Knowledge of people is the greatest asset of all.  Back to History Home Page Next page 

41  Back to History Home Page
You’ll see how many of the problems and strengths of the world today have their roots in the past. Great or mistaken decisions; combinations of developments; conspiracies or complete mess-ups all played their part!  Back to History Home Page Next page 

42  Back to History Home Page
Employers and Universities Value History very Highly. The skills that are taught within the subject are very useful in work, study and life.  Back to History Home Page Next page 

43  Back to History Home Page
In this rapidly changing world employers want people who are: Independent thinkers. Open-minded. Disciplined. Good at problem solving. Able to pick out the essential from the trivial.  Back to History Home Page Next page 

44  Back to History Home Page
‘historians are regarded as having had an education that trains their minds to assemble, organise and present facts and opinions and this is a very useful quality in many walks of life and careers…history is an excellent preparation for very many other jobs’  Back to History Home Page Next page 

45 So what do students actually do in history lessons?
You’ll find yourself doing role plays… constructing a reasoned argument both in writing and spoken aloud… playing a variety of fun simulations designed to make ideas easier to grasp, sometimes on your own, sometimes with friends... visiting historical sites: scenes of real, often tragic but always significant, events… learning how to become a master of debate. By the end of the course, you won’t just repeat the views of others - you’ll be a true historian with convincing views of your own.  Back to History Home Page Next page 

46  Back to History Home Page
Are you inquisitive? Do you like finding the reasons why something might have happened?  Back to History Home Page Next page 

47  Back to History Home Page
Are you prepared to become an investigator and research topics for yourself?  Back to History Home Page Next page 

48  Back to History Home Page
Does it excite you to shed new light on problems that have puzzled people in the past?  Back to History Home Page Next page 

49  Back to History Home Page
Do you like to form your own opinions, even if they might be different from those of your friends - or teachers?  Back to History Home Page Next page 

50  Back to History Home Page
Are you prepared to stand your ground and argue your case if you have enough evidence to back up your argument?  Back to History Home Page Next page 

51  Back to History Home Page
GCSE Well, History is…..  Back to History Home Page Next page 

52  Back to History Home Page
ard but rewarding work. I nteresting! S tudy of real people in a living past! T opical! O f real value in employment! R elevant! Y makes us ask why, why, why!  Back to History Home Page

53 Information and Communication Technology
The Core Subjects Previous Page The Timeline Home The EBacc Subject Pages FAQs Next Page Application Contact us About The Curriculum Information and Communication Technology Please browse department areas by clicking on a subject on the Subject Page or scroll through using the Next and Previous Page buttons in the top bar. The examination course students follow is the Edexcel 2010 GCSE syllabus ICT is a optional subject. In Year 9 students are introduced to MICROSOFT ACCESS (databases); SERIF WEB PLUS (creating e-portfolios/websites); SERIF DRAWPLUS AND SERIF PHOTOPLUS (vector & bitmap graphics) and SERIF MOVIEPLUS (video editing). The GCSE ICT course consists of two units: Unit 1:Living in the Digital World In this unit, students explore how digital technology impacts on the lives of individuals, organisations and society. They learn about current and emerging digital technologies and the issues raised by their use in a range of contexts (learning and earning, leisure, shopping and money management, health and wellbeing and on the move). They develop an awareness of the risks that are inherent in using ICT and the features. This is worth 40% of the final grade. Unit 2: Using Digital Tools This is a practical unit. Students broaden and enhance their ICT skills and capability. They work with a range of digital tools and techniques to produce effective ICT solutions in a range of contexts. They learn to reflect critically on their own and others’ use of ICT and to adopt safe, secure and responsible practice. The unit is internally assessed. Edexcel produce a Controlled Assessment Brief which can be completed at any time during the course but only in school. It is internally marked and externally moderated. The practical unit is worth 60% of the final mark This GCSE ICT includes elements of computer science (algorithms, basic html programming etc) as laid out in the 2014 national curriculum for Computing. Please note this GCSE is NOT a “pure” Computer Science GCSE. “Striving for Excellence” Exit

54 Year nine enjoying a day at the BBC Television Studios.
The Options Process Previous Page The Timeline Home The EBacc Subject Pages FAQs Next Page Application Contact us About The Curriculum Media Studies GCSE Please browse department areas by clicking on a subject on the Subject Page or scroll through using the Next and Previous Page buttons in the top bar. Why study media? Click here! AQA Website Year nine get to put their skills into practise at the BBC Television Studios. Year nine enjoying a day at the BBC Television Studios. “Striving for Excellence” Exit

55 Why study Media Studies?
Because, no matter how hard you try, you can not escape it! Media is all around you, wherever you go, and can strongly influence your thoughts and actions. Becoming aware of the influence of the media and the techniques authors of media texts use to persuade and influence you is very important.  Back to Media Home Page Next page 

56  Back to Media Home Page
But what can I DO with it? This course is an excellent foundation for students who hope to go on to study Media Studies, as well as more general arts based degree subjects, at Post-16 (A-level offered at SHS) and University. A career in the media is often carved out by determination and willingness to learn the job as much as a strong academic background, however Media qualifications can open doors to careers in journalism; television; film; photography; gaming and many more. The skills taught through the GCSE Media Studies course are valuable, no matter what you do in later life. photo and movie editing; presentation skills; analytical writing (helps with GCSE English) and the ability to debate current events and issues are all valuable life skills.  Back to Media Home Page Next page 

57 GCSE Media Studies The GCSE is made up of the following assessment requirements: Coursework (centre-assessed) 60% 3 assignments covering three different genres Introductory assignment (15 marks) – Advertising Cross-media assignment (30 marks) – Film promotion Practical production and evaluation (45 marks) - Magazines External assessment – 40% Four tasks on a prescribed topic area to be completed as part of the summer exam timetable. Candidates receive material in advance however the questions are unseen. 1hr 30min exam.  Back to Media Home Page Next page 

58 SAMPLE WORK FROM ASSIGNMENT ONE
ADVERTISING ANALYSE existing advertisements. CREATE your own advertisement for a specific audience. EVALUATE your own work.  Back to Media Home Page Next page 

59 SAMPLE WORK FROM ASSIGNMENT TWO
FILM ANALYSE the way a film has been promoted across the media. CREATE a film poster and a trailer for a film. EVALUATE your own work.  Back to Media Home Page Next page 

60  Back to Media Home Page
Magazine – plan and create four pages of a magazine. EVALUATE your work (ASSIGNMENT 3)  Back to Media Home Page Next page 

61  Back to Media Home Page
Gifted and Talented Students who show flair and work hard during the first 18 months of the course have the opportunity to sit their GCSE at the end of year 10 and complete a second GCSE in year 11.  Back to Media Home Page Next page 

62  Back to Media Home Page
Those students who do well… Complete coursework to the best of their ability and submit it on time. Work individually. Draft and redrafted coursework. Prepare thoroughly for the exam and show ideas and draft work to their teacher. Those who do not do so well… Do not submit work on time and therefore struggle to get everything done at the last minute. Do not redraft their work. Focus on practical work and do very little writing. Do not listen to task requirements. Make poor choices about partners when working in groups.  Back to Media Home Page Next page 

63  Back to Media Home Page
What do I need? Motivation and enthusiasm for the subject. It will help (although it is not essential) if you have access to: A computer with basic editing software, PowerPoint, and Publisher. A camera (ideally one that can record moving images)  Back to Media Home Page

64 Music GCSE Check out this GCSE composition The Options Process
Previous Page The Timeline Home The EBacc Subject Pages FAQs Next Page Application Contact us About The Curriculum Music GCSE Check out this GCSE composition Please browse department areas by clicking on a subject on the Subject Page or scroll through using the Next and Previous Page buttons in the top bar. Why take music? Music enables you to develop a vast range of skills, including: Communication Working with others Confidence Creativity Empathy Resilience Commitment Analysis GCSE Music is the ideal course to lead into BTEC Music at Shirley High Sixth Form. THE COURSE 1. Performing on your instrument (30%) 2. Composing (30%) 3. Listening and Analysis exam (20%) 4. Creative Task—compose a short piece in exam conditions. (20%) For more information, click on the link below Key Requirements Learn, or be prepared to learn a musical instrument / voice. Have an appreciation of ALL musical styles, from Classical to pop ballads. Enjoy composing music in a variety of different styles Click here for Music FAQs “Striving for Excellence” Exit

65 Music FAQs The Options Process Exit “Striving for Excellence”
Previous Page The Timeline Home The EBacc Subject Pages FAQs Next Page Application Contact us About The Curriculum Music FAQs Please browse department areas by clicking on a subject on the Subject Page or scroll through using the Next and Previous Page buttons in the top bar. Do I need to have passed any grades on my instrument? Do I have to learn an instrument? You need to be having  instrumental lessons by September of year 9, in order to qualify for the GCSE. These lessons can be on any instrument, voice or drums. No, but you must be willing to practise and work hard at developing your performance skills during the course. Numerous Concert opportunities include: School shows and productions. Annual concert tour. Performance evenings in school in front of parents. GCSE Music students have also performed in concerts and at events such as the recent Jack Petchy Awards. Will there be concerts where I can sing/play? How many lessons will I have a week? You will have one double and one single lesson a week, as well as your instrumental lesson. No, but you will be taught the basics in year 9. You must have a willingness to learn to read music, as it is a part of the theory paper in year 11. Do I have to be able to read music? Music Homepage “Striving for Excellence” Exit

66 Photography GCSE The Options Process Exit “Striving for Excellence”
NOTE Students are required to attend extra Photography sessions at lunchtime and after School. All students must have a camera and will need to contribute toward the cost of the sketchbook and photographic material The Options Process Previous Page The Timeline Home The EBacc Subject Pages FAQs Next Page Application Contact us About The Curriculum Photography GCSE Please browse department areas by clicking on a subject on the Subject Page or scroll through using the Next and Previous Page buttons in the top bar. Assessment AQA’s GCSE Photography is an endorsed course made up of two units: Unit 1: Personal Portfolio in Photography Internally set and marked; assessed through controlled assessment. Unit 2: Externally Set Assignment in Photography Externally set themes and internally marked. Both units are assessed using four Assessment Objectives. These can be summed up as: AO1 contextual references and research of photographers, AO2 ideas and photo shop, AO3 research and photo shoots, AO4 final image and making connections. Key Web Links: AQA - Art and Design BBC GCSE Bitesize Website- Art and Design The Course This course is suitable for students who are: Keen to develop their photographic skills Able to analyse and evaluate photographic images in depth and in detail Able to enjoy taking and making photographs Willing to have their photographs taken and experiment with photo shop. Willing to review their progress and make improvements following advice. Further Opportunities Students can progress to further education courses at level three such as: BTEC National in Photography. GCE AS Photography During this course you will have built up a considerable portfolio of work that will support you in photography related job opportunities and entrance to Art and Design courses at post 16. A variety of careers ranging from: Photography, Film, Video and Computer Animation, The possibilities are endless… “Striving for Excellence” Exit

67 Physical Education GCSE
New GCSE changes Due to subject content and assessment changes led by the Department for Education (DfE) and Ofqual, GCSE PE qualifications are changing for first teaching from September The DfE has published the final assessment objectives, subject content and activity list, on which all new GCSE PE specifications will be based. The Options Process Previous Page The Timeline Home The EBacc Subject Pages FAQs Next Page Application Contact us About The Curriculum Physical Education GCSE Please browse department areas by clicking on a subject on the Subject Page or scroll through using the Next and Previous Page buttons in the top bar. Objective Requirements Weighting AO1 Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of the factors that underpin performance and involvement in physical activity and sport 25% AO2 Apply knowledge and understanding of the factors that underpin performance and involvement in physical activity and sport 20% AO3 Analyse and evaluate the factors that underpin performance and involvement in physical activity and sport 15% AO4 • Demonstrate and apply relevant skills and techniques in physical activity and sport • Analyse and evaluate own performance to identify areas of improvement 40% The Course Students will study and follow a three year course leading towards an AQA GCSE in Physical Education qualification The course will demand a high level of practical ability and natural talent.  Students should be prepared to work hard in a variety of sports.  A willingness to represent the school in school sports teams is expected.  Theory and written work are major elements of the course and these requirements should be considered when making your decisions. The AQA GCSE course leads to a GCSE qualification at A* - G and as stated previously covers both practical and theory aspects. The new GCSE PE - what you need to know The new GCSE PE qualification will be 40% non-exam assessment with students assessed in the role of player/performer. Students will be assessed in three different activities; a team activity, an individual activity and lastly from either a team or individual activity. Areas of study relating to increasing participation in physical activity and a healthy lifestyle have been replaced with more traditional PE related content, such as anatomy and physiology. The new content also addresses contemporary topics in sport such as the use of data in physical activity and sport, which will help to develop further skills in your students. All sporting activities must have a competitive or formal condition in which students can be assessed. Students cannot be assessed in the recreational form of an activity. The full and complete activity list that students will be assessed in for GCSE PE will be consistent across all examination boards. “Striving for Excellence” Next PE Page Exit

68 Physical Education GCSE
The Options Process Previous Page The Timeline Home The EBacc Subject Pages FAQs Next Page Application Contact us About The Curriculum Physical Education GCSE Please browse department areas by clicking on a subject on the Subject Page or scroll through using the Next and Previous Page buttons in the top bar. Trips As part of the GCSE course the PE Department have recently introduced Kayaking and Rock Climbing into the practical assessment. Due to the cost of running trips to the centres these sports are not compulsory for students, however they do offer students the chance to achieve on average higher practical scores and as a result students are encouraged to take up this opportunity. Practical: Students will experience a variety of sports and will be assessed on their performance, their knowledge of rules and tactics, and their ability to analyse and improve other students' performance as well as their own. Further Opportunities GCSE Physical Education provide a foundation for anyone who wishes to go on to further or higher education to study for a sport, leisure or recreational qualification or seeking employment in these areas.  The course is also of value to those students interested in sport, who although not directly interested in pursuing a career in a sport related activity, are seeking academic recognition for an area of study that they enjoy. Previous PE Page Assessment Students are assessed through coursework only. This takes the form of presentations, practical work, observation sheets, and video analysis.  Previous PE page “Striving for Excellence” Exit

69 Spanish GCSE AQA Website The Options Process Core Subjects Exit
Previous Page The Timeline Home The EBacc Subject Pages FAQs Next Page Application Contact us About The Curriculum Spanish GCSE Please browse department areas by clicking on a subject on the Subject Page or scroll through using the Next and Previous Page buttons in the top bar. AQA Website The Course In year nine students learn how to be able to introduce themselves and their family, talk about their school, their house, their town and say what their hobbies are. In years ten and eleven students cover the topics of holidays, work, shopping, free time and healthy living whilst preparing for their controlled assessments. Future opportunities Having a Spanish GCSE is a benefit to most jobs, not just teaching, translating and interpreting. With the business world becoming ever more global and a vast amount of companies becoming international means when applying for a job having knowledge of a Modern Foreign Language is always an advantage. This course is also very popular with students who regularly holiday in Spanish speaking countries to enhance their travel experience and to be able to communicate with the locals as well as understanding their culture and traditions. Requirements Students will be expected to meet deadlines. Homework will be given on a weekly basis and will consist of worksheets, vocabulary tests and written tasks. This is an express course, as it is to be completed in only three years and therefore a huge amount of dedication and hard work is required by students wanting to take this course. Assessment Listening exam (Foundation 35 mins, Higher 45 mins) Reading exam (Foundation 30 mins, Higher 50 mins) 2 Written controlled assessments (Not tiered -Each must be 300 words) 2 Speaking exams (Untiered – each must last 4-6 mins) Core Subjects “Striving for Excellence” Exit

70 The Options Process The Timeline Home The EBacc Subject Pages FAQs Application Contact us About The Curriculum Next Page Please note: The application window opens on Tuesday 28th April 2015 and closes on Tuesday 5th May 2015. Application Please read this page carefully before logging on to the application form. The application form By clicking on the application form button at the bottom of the page you will be directed to the logon page for the application form. Once logged on you will need to select which route you want to go down, the EBac route or the Open Option route. You will then be asked to select the subject you would like to study next year. When you are ready to make your choices please use the application button below to be directed to the logon page. The EBac route First you will be asked to select which language you want to study, French or Spanish. Then which humanities subject, history or geography. Finally you will be asked to select the other subjects you would like to study. We will ask you to pick three subjects but please do select in order of preference as we will try and give you your first choice. You will only be able to submit one form. If you do make a mistake or want to change your choices please contact the school as soon as possible. Any changes will need to be submitted in writing. The Open Option route If you choose the Open Option route you will have a free choice of what to study next year. We ask you to choose five different subjects as it is not always possible to give you your first three choices. Because of this it is important that you select your subjects in order of preference as we will always try and give you your first three choices. Username and Password All parents/carers will be issued with a unique username and password. You must use this to access the on-line options application form. You will be asked to sign for your logon details at the options evening on Tuesday 28th April If you are unable to be at the evening please us, using the button below, and we will send you your logon details by post. The application window The application form is only open from Tuesday 28th April until Tuesday 5th May Your form must be submitted during this time. Application Form us “Striving for Excellence” Exit

71 Application Please note: The application window is currently closed.
The Options Process Previous Page The Timeline Home The EBacc Subject Pages FAQs Application Contact us About The Curriculum Application Please note: The application window is currently closed. Please try again between 28/04/15 and 05/05/15 Click here to return to booklet “Striving for Excellence” Exit

72 Contact us Telephone 020 8656 9755 e-mail
The Options Process The Timeline Home The EBacc Subject Pages FAQs Application Contact us About The Curriculum Contact us If you require any further information or have a question that needs answering please contact us. Telephone Post Shirley Church Road Croydon CRO 5EF Website “Striving for Excellence” Exit

73 The Core Subjects The Core Subjects English Language and Literature
Previous Page The Timeline Home The EBacc Subject Pages FAQs Next Page Application Contact us About The Curriculum The Core Subjects These are the core subjects that all students study Citizenship and Personal, Social and Economic Education (PSHEE) English Language and Literature French (Sets 1 and 2 Only) Mathematics Physical Education Religious Studies Science Spanish (Sets 1 and 2 Only) Work Related Learning “Striving for Excellence” Exit

74 Back to Core Subjects Page
The Core Subjects Previous Page The Timeline Home The EBacc Subject Pages FAQs Next Page Application Contact us About The Curriculum Citizenship and PSHEE Please browse department areas by clicking on a subject on the Subject Page or scroll through using the Next and Previous Page buttons in the top bar. In Year 9 PSHEE and Citizenship lessons students cover themes such as Financial Capability, Health and Wellbeing, SRE (Social and Relationship Education), Careers, Life Skills, Human Rights and Discrimination, Respecting Individual Difference, Emotional Health and Wellbeing. Key Concepts: Commitment Responsibilities Conflict Reconciliation Citizenship in year 9, 10 and 11 is delivered through the GCSE RS course Year 10 and 11: PSHEE is delivered in two different ways, through Drop Down Days and through R.E lessons. Year 10 receive two drop down days and Year 11 receive one. Organisations that contribute are: The London Ambulance Service, The London Metropolitan Police Service, Rape Crisis, Rethink Mental Health, Diversity Role Models, Drug Free World, Croydon NHS Sexual Outreach team, Croydon NHS, Bite the Ballot, MyBnk Enterprise Lab, Ignite Potential and Fearless. “Striving for Excellence” Exit Back to Core Subjects Page

75 English Language and Literature GCSE
The Core Subjects Previous Page The Timeline Home The EBacc Subject Pages FAQs Next Page Application Contact us About The Curriculum English Language and Literature GCSE Please browse department areas by clicking on a subject on the Subject Page or scroll through using the Next and Previous Page buttons in the top bar. English Language GCSE English Literature Overview Exam 1 – Explorations in creative reading and writing 1 ¾ hours 80 marks (50% of qualification) 2 sections Section A – Reading One single text (unseen) 1 short form question 2 longer form question 1 extended question Section B - Writing Descriptive or narrative writing Exam – Writers’ viewpoints and perspectives 1 ¾ hours 80 marks (50% of qualification) 2 sections Section A – Reading Two linked texts 1 short form question 2 longer form question 1 extended question Section B - Writing 1 extended question – no choice Set Texts  Previous PE page “Striving for Excellence” Exit Back to Core Subjects Page

76 GCSE English Literature overview
Previous Page The Timeline Home The EBacc Subject Pages FAQs Next Page Application Contact us About The Curriculum Exam 1 – Shakespeare and the 19th Century Novel Closed text 1 ¾ hours 60 marks (40% of qualification) Section A – Shakespeare One question (no choice) Students to write about the extract and the whole play Section B – 19th Century novel One question (no choice) Students to write about the extract and the whole text Exam 2 – Modern Texts and Poetry 2 ¼ hours 96 marks (60% of qualification) Section A – Modern Texts One question from choice of two Section B – Poetry One question – some choice of poem Comparison question Section c – Unseen Poetry Two questions 1st question requires response to unseen poem 2nd question requires response to unseen poem from 1st question AND a second unseen poem  Return to English Page “Striving for Excellence” Exit Back to Core Subjects Page

77 GCSE English Literature Set Texts
Previous Page The Timeline Home The EBacc Subject Pages FAQs Next Page Application Contact us About The Curriculum Shakespeare – a choice of: Macbeth Romeo and Juliet The Tempest The Merchant of Venice Much Ado About Nothing Julius Caesar The 19th Century novel – a choice of: Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde A Christmas Carol Great Expectations Jane Eyre Frankenstein Pride and Prejudice The Sign of Four Modern Texts – a choice of: An Inspector Calls Blood Brothers The History Boys DNA The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night Time (play script) A Taste of Honey Lord of the Flies Telling Tales (AQA Anthology) Animal Farm Never Let Me Go Anita and Me Pigeon English  Return to English Page “Striving for Excellence” Exit Back to Core Subjects Page

78 3 Ratio, proportion and rates of change
The Core Subjects Previous Page The Timeline Home The EBacc Subject Pages FAQs Next Page Application Contact us About The Curriculum Mathematics GCSE Please browse department areas by clicking on a subject on the Subject Page or scroll through using the Next and Previous Page buttons in the top bar. The content of GCSE (9 - 1) in Mathematics (1MA1) Specifications: Number, Algebra, Ratio and Proportion, Geometry, Measures, Probability and Statistics . Don’t worry if you don’t know what all of these mean yet – you will know at the end of your three years of study. Topics in bold are Higher tier only. The GCSE will be entirely assessed by written examination, which means that no coursework will be expected from any student. Overview of content For More information on each area of study please click below: 1 Number 2 Algebra 3 Ratio, proportion and rates of change 4 Geometry and measures 5 Probability 6 Statistics Useful websites: Fronter-maths resource room Resources: Specimen papers- see Fronter Overview of assessment Two assessment series available per year: May/June and November*. Three written papers: each contributes 33.3% of the final grade Tiered papers Foundation Tier grades 1-5 Higher Tier grades 4-9 grade 3 allowed Paper 1F and 1H: Non-calculator 1 hour 30 minutes 80 marks Paper 2F and 2H: Calculator 1 hour 30 minutes 80 marks Paper 3F and 3H: calculator r1 hour 30 minutes 80 marks  Previous PE page “Striving for Excellence” Exit Back to Core Subjects Page

79 Back to Core Subjects Page
The Core Subjects Previous Page The Timeline Home The EBacc Subject Pages FAQs Next Page Application Contact us About The Curriculum Mathematics GCSE Back to Maths Home Page Please browse department areas by clicking on a subject on the Subject Page or scroll through using the Next and Previous Page buttons in the top bar. Number Structure and calculation N1 order positive and negative integers, decimals and fractions; use the symbols =, ≠, , ≤, ≥ N2 apply the four operations, including formal written methods, to integers, decimals and simple fractions (proper and improper), and mixed numbers – all both positive and negative; understand and use place value N3 recognise and use relationships between operations, including inverse operations ; use conventional notation for priority of operations, including brackets, powers, roots and reciprocals N4 use the concepts and vocabulary of prime numbers, factors (divisors), multiples, common factors, common multiples, highest common factor, lowest common multiple, prime factorisation, including using product notation and the unique factorisation theorem N5 apply systematic listing strategies, including use of the product rule for counting N6 use positive integer powers and associated real roots, recognise powers of 2, 3, 4, 5; estimate powers and roots of any given positive number N7 calculate with roots, and with integer and fractional indices N8 calculate exactly with fractions, surds and multiples of π; simplify surd expressions involving squares) and rationalise denominators N9 calculate with and interpret standard form A × 10n, where 1 ≤ A < 10 and n is an integer Fractions, decimals and percentages N10 work interchangeably with terminating decimals and their corresponding fractions change recurring decimals into their corresponding fractions and vice versa N11 identify and work with fractions in ratio problems N12 interpret fractions and percentages as operators N13 use standard units of mass, length, time, money and other measures using decimal quantities where appropriate N14 estimate answers; check calculations using approximation and estimation, including answers obtained using technology N15 round numbers and measures to an appropriate degree of accuracy); use inequality notation to specify simple error intervals due to truncation or rounding N16 apply and interpret limits of accuracy, including upper and lower bounds  Previous PE page “Striving for Excellence” Exit Back to Core Subjects Page

80 Back to Core Subjects Page
The Core Subjects Previous Page The Timeline Home The EBacc Subject Pages FAQs Next Page Application Contact us About The Curriculum Mathematics GCSE Back to Maths Home Page Please browse department areas by clicking on a subject on the Subject Page or scroll through using the Next and Previous Page buttons in the top bar. 2. Algebra Notation: A1 use and interpret algebraic manipulation, including:  ab in place of a × b  3y in place of y + y + y and 3 × y  a 2 in place of a × a, a 3 in place of a × a × a, a 2 b in place of a × a × b  a b in place of a ÷ b ● coefficients written as fractions rather than as decimals ● brackets A2 substitute numerical values into formulae and expressions, including scientific formulae A3 understand and use the concepts and vocabulary of expressions, equations, formulae, identities, inequalities, terms and factors A4 simplify and manipulate algebraic expressions by: ● collecting like terms ● multiplying a single term over a bracket ● taking out common factors ● expanding products of two or more binomials ● factorising quadratic expressions of the form x 2 + bx + c, including the difference of two squares; factorising quadratic expressions of the form ax 2 + bx + c ● simplifying expressions involving sums, products and powers, including the laws of indices A5 understand and use standard mathematical formulae; rearrange formulae to change the subject A6 know the difference between an equation and an identity; argue mathematically to show algebraic expressions are equivalent, and use algebra to support and construct arguments and proofs A7 where appropriate, interpret simple expressions as functions with inputs and outputs; interpret the reverse process as the ‘inverse function’; interpret the succession of two functions as a ‘composite function’ (the use of formal function notation is expected) Graphs: A8 work with coordinates in all four quadrants A9 plot graphs of equations that correspond to straight-line graphs in the coordinate plane; use the form y = mx + c to identify parallel and perpendicular lines; find the equation of the line through two given points or through one point with a given gradient A10 identify and interpret gradients and intercepts of linear functions graphically and algebraically A11 identify and interpret roots, intercepts, turning points of quadratic functions graphically; deduce roots algebraically and turning points by completing the square A12 recognise, sketch and interpret graphs of linear functions, quadratic functions, simple cubic functions, the reciprocal function 1 y x  with x ≠ 0, exponential functions y = kx for positive values of k, and the trigonometric functions (with arguments in degrees) y = sin x, y = cos x and y = tan x for angles of any size A13 sketch translations and reflections of a given function A14 plot and interpret graphs (including reciprocal graphs and exponential graphs) and graphs of non-standard functions in real contexts to find approximate solutions to problems such as simple kinematic problems involving distance, speed and acceleration A15 calculate or estimate gradients of graphs and areas under graphs, and interpret results in cases such as distance-time graphs, velocity-time graphs and graphs in financial contexts) A16 recognise and use the equation of a circle with centre at the origin; find the equation of a tangent to a circle at a given point Solving equations and inequalities: A17 solve linear equations in one unknown algebraically; find approximate solutions using a graph A18 solve quadratic equations algebraically by factorising, by completing the square and by using the quadratic formula; find approximate solutions using a graph A19 solve two simultaneous equations in two variables algebraically; find approximate solutions using a graph A20 find approximate solutions to equations numerically using iteration A21 translate simple situations or procedures into algebraic expressions or formulae; derive an equation (or two simultaneous equations), solve the equation(s) and interpret the solution A22 solve linear inequalities in one or two variable(s), and quadratic inequalities in one variable; represent the solution set on a number line, using set notation and on a graph Sequences : A23 generate terms of a sequence from either a term-to-term or a position-toterm rule A24 recognise and use sequences of triangular, square and cube numbers, simple arithmetic progressions, Fibonacci type sequences, quadratic sequences, and simple geometric progressions (r n where n is an integer, and r is a rational number > 0 or a surd) and other sequences A25 deduce expressions to calculate the nth term of linear and quadratic sequences “Striving for Excellence” Exit Back to Core Subjects Page

81 Back to Core Subjects Page
The Core Subjects Previous Page The Timeline Home The EBacc Subject Pages FAQs Next Page Application Contact us About The Curriculum Mathematics GCSE Back to Maths Home Page Please browse department areas by clicking on a subject on the Subject Page or scroll through using the Next and Previous Page buttons in the top bar. 3. Ratio, proportion and rates of change R1 change freely between related standard units and compound units) in numerical and algebraic contexts R2 use scale factors, scale diagrams and maps R3 express one quantity as a fraction of another, where the fraction is less than 1 or greater than 1 R4 use ratio notation, including reduction to simplest form R5 divide a given quantity into two parts in a given part: part or part: whole ratio; express the division of a quantity into two parts as a ratio; apply ratio to real contexts and problems R6 express a multiplicative relationship between two quantities as a ratio or a fraction R7 understand and use proportion as equality of ratios R8 relate ratios to fractions and to linear functions R9 define percentage as ‘number of parts per hundred’; interpret percentages and percentage changes as a fraction or a decimal, and interpret these multiplicatively; express one quantity as a percentage of another; compare two quantities using percentages; work with percentages greater than 100%; solve problems involving percentage change, including percentage increase/decrease and original value problems, and simple interest including in financial mathematics R10 solve problems involving direct and inverse proportion, including graphical and algebraic representations R11 use compound units such as speed, rates of pay, unit pricing, density and pressure R12 compare lengths, areas and volumes using ratio notation; make links to similarity and scale factors R13 understand that X is inversely proportional to Y is equivalent to X is proportional to 1 Y ; construct and interpret equations that describe direct and inverse proportion R14 interpret the gradient of a straight line graph as a rate of change; recognise and interpret graphs that illustrate direct and inverse proportion R15 interpret the gradient at a point on a curve as the instantaneous rate of change; apply the concepts of average and instantaneous rate of change (gradients of chords and tangents) in numerical, algebraic and graphical contexts (this does not include calculus) R16 set up, solve and interpret the answers in growth and decay problems, including compound interest and work with general iterative processes “Striving for Excellence” Exit Back to Core Subjects Page

82 Back to Core Subjects Page
The Core Subjects Previous Page The Timeline Home The EBacc Subject Pages FAQs Next Page Application Contact us About The Curriculum Mathematics GCSE Back to Maths Home Page Please browse department areas by clicking on a subject on the Subject Page or scroll through using the Next and Previous Page buttons in the top bar. 4. Geometry and measures Properties and constructions G1 use conventional terms and notations: points, lines, vertices, edges, planes, parallel lines, perpendicular lines, right angles, polygons, regular polygons and polygons with reflection and/or rotation symmetries; use the standard conventions for labelling and referring to the sides and angles of triangles; draw diagrams from written description G2 use the standard ruler and compass constructions; use these to construct given figures and solve loci problems; know that the perpendicular distance from a point to a line is the shortest distance to the line G3 apply the properties of angles at a point, angles at a point on a straight line, vertically opposite angles; understand and use alternate and corresponding angles on parallel lines; derive and use the sum of angles in a triangle G4 derive and apply the properties and definitions of: special types of quadrilaterals, including square, rectangle, parallelogram, trapezium, kite and rhombus; and triangles and other plane figures using appropriate language G5 use the basic congruence criteria for triangles (SSS, SAS, ASA, RHS) G6 apply angle facts, triangle congruence, similarity and properties of quadrilaterals to conjecture and derive results about angles and sides, including Pythagoras’ theorem and the fact that the base angles of an isosceles triangle are equal, and use known results to obtain simple proofs G7 identify, describe and construct congruent and similar shapes, including on coordinate axes, by considering rotation, reflection, translation and enlargement G8 describe the changes and invariance achieved by combinations of rotations, reflections and translations G9 identify and apply circle definitions and properties, including: centre, radius, chord, diameter, circumference, tangent, arc, sector and segment G10 apply and prove the standard circle theorems concerning angles, radii, tangents and chords, and use them to prove related results G11 solve geometrical problems on coordinate axes G12 identify properties of the faces, surfaces, edges and vertices of: cubes, cuboids, prisms, cylinders, pyramids, cones and spheres G13 construct and interpret plans and elevations of 3D shapes Mensuration and calculation G14 use standard units of measure and related concepts G15 measure line segments and angles in geometric figures, including interpreting maps and scale drawings and use of bearings G16 know and apply formulae to calculate: area of triangles, parallelograms, trapezia; volume of cuboids and other right prisms (including cylinders) G17 know the formulae: circumference of a circle = 2πr = πd , area of a circle = πr 2 ; calculate: perimeters of 2D shapes, including circles; areas of circles and composite shapes; surface area and volume of spheres, pyramids, cones and composite solids G18 calculate arc lengths, angles and areas of sectors of circles G19 apply the concepts of congruence and similarity, including the relationships between lengths, areas and volumes in similar figures G20 know the formulae for: Pythagoras’ theorem a 2 + b2 = c 2 , and the trigonometric ratios, sin θ = opposite hypotenuse , cos θ = adjacent hypotenuse and tan θ = opposite adjacent ; apply them to find angles and lengths in right-angled triangles and, where possible, general triangles in two and three dimensional figures G21 know the exact values of sin θ and cos θ for θ = 0°, 30°, 45°, 60° and 90°; know the exact value of tan θ for θ = 0°, 30°, 45° and 60° G22 know and apply the sine rule a sin A = b sin B = c sin C , and cosine rule a 2 = b2 + c 2 – 2bc cos A, to find unknown lengths and angles G23 know and apply Area = sin C ab 2 1 to calculate the area, sides or angles of any triangle Vectors : G24 describe translations as 2D vectors G25 apply addition and subtraction of vectors, multiplication of vectors by a scalar, and diagrammatic and column representations of vectors; use vectors to construct geometric arguments and proofs “Striving for Excellence” Exit Back to Core Subjects Page

83 Back to Core Subjects Page
The Core Subjects Previous Page The Timeline Home The EBacc Subject Pages FAQs Next Page Application Contact us About The Curriculum Mathematics GCSE Please browse department areas by clicking on a subject on the Subject Page or scroll through using the Next and Previous Page buttons in the top bar. 5. Probability P1 record, describe and analyse the frequency of outcomes of probability experiments using tables and frequency trees P2 apply ideas of randomness, fairness and equally likely events to calculate expected outcomes of multiple future experiments P3 relate relative expected frequencies to theoretical probability, using appropriate language and the 0-1 probability scale P4 apply the property that the probabilities of an exhaustive set of outcomes sum to one; apply the property that the probabilities of an exhaustive set of mutually exclusive events sum to one P5 understand that empirical unbiased samples tend towards theoretical probability distributions, with increasing sample size P6 enumerate sets and combinations of sets systematically, using tables, grids, Venn diagrams and tree diagrams P7 construct theoretical possibility spaces for single and combined experiments with equally likely outcomes and use these to calculate theoretical probabilities P8 calculate the probability of independent and dependent combined events, including using tree diagrams and other representations, and know the underlying assumptions P9 calculate and interpret conditional probabilities through representation using expected frequencies with two-way tables, tree diagrams and Venn diagrams Back to Maths Home Page “Striving for Excellence” Exit Back to Core Subjects Page

84 Back to Core Subjects Page
The Core Subjects Previous Page The Timeline Home The EBacc Subject Pages FAQs Next Page Application Contact us About The Curriculum Mathematics GCSE Please browse department areas by clicking on a subject on the Subject Page or scroll through using the Next and Previous Page buttons in the top bar. 6. Statistics S1 infer properties of populations or distributions from a sample, while knowing the limitations of sampling S2 interpret and construct tables, charts and diagrams, including frequency tables, bar charts, pie charts and pictograms for categorical data, vertical line charts for ungrouped discrete numerical data, tables and line graphs for time series data and know their appropriate use S3 construct and interpret diagrams for grouped discrete data and continuous data, i.e. histograms with equal and unequal class intervals and cumulative frequency graphs, and know their appropriate use S4 interpret, analyse and compare the distributions of data sets from univariate empirical distributions through: ● appropriate graphical representation involving discrete, continuous and grouped data, including box plots ● appropriate measures of central tendency (median, mean, mode and modal class) and spread (range, including consideration of outliers, quartiles and inter-quartile range) S5 apply statistics to describe a population S6 use and interpret scatter graphs of bivariate data; recognise correlation and know that it does not indicate causation; draw estimated lines of best fit; make predictions; interpolate and extrapolate apparent trends while knowing the dangers of so doing Back to Maths Home Page “Striving for Excellence” Exit Back to Core Subjects Page

85 Back to Core Subjects Page
The Core Subjects Previous Page The Timeline Home The EBacc Subject Pages FAQs Next Page Application Contact us About The Curriculum Physical Education Core Please browse department areas by clicking on a subject on the Subject Page or scroll through using the Next and Previous Page buttons in the top bar. Students in Key Stage 4 will follow a broad range of activities during core Physical Education (PE). The activities that are on offer are: Athletic Activities, Dance Activities, Games Activities (Invasion Games, Net Games & Striking Games), Gymnastics Activities, and Outdoor & Adventurous Activities Sports Leaders The breadth of activities in Key Stage 4 allows students the opportunity to experience non-traditional activities such as Zumba and Handball. Curriculum Aims Learning and undertaking activities in PE contribute to achievement of the curriculum aims for all young people to become:• successful learners who enjoy learning, make progress and achieve • confident individuals who are able to live safe, healthy and fulfilling lives • responsible citizens who make a positive contribution to society. The Importance of Physical Education PE develops students’ competence and confidence to take part in a range of physical activities that become a central part of their lives, both in and out of school. A high-quality PE curriculum enables all students to enjoy and succeed in many kinds of physical activity. They develop a wide range of skills and the ability to use tactics, strategies and compositional ideas to perform successfully. When they are performing, they think about what they are doing, analyse the situation and make decisions. They also reflect on their own and others’ performances and find ways to improve them. As a result, they develop the confidence to take part in different physical activities and learn about the value of healthy, active lifestyles. Discovering what they like to do and what their aptitudes are at school, and how and where to get involved in physical activity helps them make informed choices about lifelong physical activity. PE helps students develop personally and socially. They work as individuals, in groups and in teams, developing concepts of fairness and of personal and social responsibility. They take on different roles and responsibilities, including leadership, coaching and officiating. Through the range of experiences that PE offers, they learn how to be effective in competitive, creative and challenging situations. “Striving for Excellence” Exit Back to Core Subjects Page

86 Back to Core Subjects Page
The Core Subjects Previous Page The Timeline Home The EBacc Subject Pages FAQs Next Page Application Contact us About The Curriculum Religious Studies GCSE Please browse department areas by clicking on a subject on the Subject Page or scroll through using the Next and Previous Page buttons in the top bar. “Science tells you the how.....we encourage you to think about the why” Exam Board – Welsh Joint Education Committee (WJEC) Website - Exam Info: 100% exam – NO coursework 2 exams - 1hr 45 mins each Paper 1 – Religion and Life Issues Four Units; Our world (covering creation, animal rights, purpose of humankind); Relationships (covering sex, marriage, divorce, families, lifestyle choices); Is it fair? (covering prejudice, discrimination, equality, wealth, poverty, justice and injustice) and Looking for Meaning (covering the existence of God, funeral rites and the afterlife) Paper 2 – Religion and Human Experiences Four Units; Religion and Conflict (covering war, peace, interfaith dialogue), Religion and medicine (covering, sanctity of life, euthanasia, abortion, embryo technology, organ donation); Religious Expression (symbols, religious clothing, places of worship, pilgrimage, evangelism); Authority and State (covering religion and the law, religious law, conflict between religion and the state, secularism) Students encouraged to read newspapers and watch the news on a regular basis. Average lesson will involve some form of debate, note taking and exam practice techniques. “Striving for Excellence” Exit Back to Core Subjects Page

87 Back to Core Subjects Page
The Core Subjects Previous Page The Timeline Home The EBacc Subject Pages FAQs Next Page Application Contact us About The Curriculum Science GCSE Please browse department areas by clicking on a subject on the Subject Page or scroll through using the Next and Previous Page buttons in the top bar. The department runs a condensed KS3 syllabus Students complete the KS3 syllabus in year 8 All students start GCSE science in year 9 GCSE Chemistry, Biology, Physics GCSECombined science( Double Award) The Department will be following the AQA combined science ( double award award )specifications and GCSE Chemistry, Biology and Physics specifications. 1.https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/307619/GCSE_combined_science_content.pdf 2.https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/303093/GCSE_single_science_content-.pdf Students may study either the Triple science or the combined science course depending on ability. GCSE combined Science is a course for learners of all abilities. Contact If you have any queries regarding any GCSE science course please contact Mrs P Ike (Head of Science) at the school address or Combined Science Triple Science “Striving for Excellence” Exit Back to Core Subjects Page

88 Combined Science GCSE (Double Award)
The Core Subjects Previous Page The Timeline Home The EBacc Subject Pages FAQs Next Page Application Contact us About The Curriculum Combined Science GCSE (Double Award) Please browse department areas by clicking on a subject on the Subject Page or scroll through using the Next and Previous Page buttons in the top bar. Assessment GCSEs will continue to be linear, which means all assessment is at the end of the course the new grading structure of 9 to 1 will replace A* to G grades controlled assessments will be discontinued. From summer 2018 the A* to G grading structure in GCSE science will be replaced by the numerical system ranging from 9 to 1. Performance measures at KS4 are also changing. The new system starts in summer 2016. About the course… In combined science there should be a minimum of 30% of each of biology, chemistry and physics. All mathematics content must be assessed within the lifetime of the specification. The two main dimensions of the content The ways in which GCSE specifications in combined science should enable students to show their understanding of the concepts and methods of science are spelt out below in two main sections. The first section explains the main ways in which working scientifically should be developed and assessed. The second section sets out the key ideas and subject contents for the biology, chemistry and physics components of combined science. In combined science there should be a minimum of 30% of each of biology, chemistry and physics. Science Home Page Combined Science cont… “Striving for Excellence” Exit Back to Core Subjects Page

89 Back to Core Subjects Page
The Core Subjects Previous Page The Timeline Home The EBacc Subject Pages FAQs Next Page Application Contact us About The Curriculum Combined Science GCSE Please browse department areas by clicking on a subject on the Subject Page or scroll through using the Next and Previous Page buttons in the top bar. Working scientifically 1. Development of scientific thinking. 2. Experimental skills and strategies. 3. Analysis and evaluation 4. Scientific vocabulary, quantities, units, symbols and nomenclature Physics Energy Forces Forces and motion Waves in matter Light and electromagnetic waves Electricity Magnetism and electromagnetism Particle model of matter Atomic structure Biology GCSE combined science specifications should require students to: Cell biology Transport systems- Health, disease and the development of medicines Coordination and control Photosynthesis Ecosystems Inheritance, variation and evolution Use of mathematics Chemistry GCSE combined science specifications should require students to: Atomic structure and the periodic table. Structure, bonding and the properties of matter. Chemical changes Energy changes in chemistry . The rate and extent of chemical change. Chemical analysis. Chemical and allied industries . Earth and atmospheric science. Science Home Page Triple Science “Striving for Excellence” Exit Back to Core Subjects Page

90 Back to Core Subjects Page
The Core Subjects Previous Page The Timeline Home The EBacc Subject Pages FAQs Next Page Application Contact us About The Curriculum Triple Science GCSE (Chemistry, Physics, Biology) Please browse department areas by clicking on a subject on the Subject Page or scroll through using the Next and Previous Page buttons in the top bar. Assessment GCSEs will continue to be linear, which means all assessment is at the end of the course the new grading structure of 9 to 1 will replace A* to G grades controlled assessments will be discontinued. From summer 2018 the A* to G grading structure in GCSE science will be replaced by the numerical system ranging from 9 to 1. Performance measures at KS4 are also changing. The new system starts in summer 2016. About the course… In combined science there should be a minimum of 30% of each of biology, chemistry and physics. All mathematics content must be assessed within the lifetime of the specification. The two main dimensions of the content The ways in which GCSE specifications in combined science should enable students to show their understanding of the concepts and methods of science are spelt out below in two main sections. The first section explains the main ways in which working scientifically should be developed and assessed. The second section sets out the key ideas and subject contents for the biology, chemistry and physics components of combined science. In combined science there should be a minimum of 30% of each of biology, chemistry and physics. Science Home Page Triple Science cont.. “Striving for Excellence” Exit Back to Core Subjects Page

91 Back to Core Subjects Page
The Core Subjects Previous Page The Timeline Home The EBacc Subject Pages FAQs Next Page Application Contact us About The Curriculum Triple Science GCSE (Chemistry, Physics, Biology) Please browse department areas by clicking on a subject on the Subject Page or scroll through using the Next and Previous Page buttons in the top bar. Chemistry Atomic structure and the Periodic Table Structure, bonding and the properties of matter Chemical changes Energy changes in chemistry The rate and extent of chemical change Organic chemistry Chemical analysis Chemical and allied industries Earth and atmospheric science Physics Energy Forces Forces and motion Waves in matter Light and electromagnetic waves Electricity Magnetism and electromagnetism Particle model of matter Atomic structure Space physics Working scientifically 1. Development of scientific thinking. 2. Experimental skills and strategies. 3. Analysis and evaluation 4. Scientific vocabulary, quantities, units, symbols and nomenclature Biology Cell biology Transport systems Health, disease and the development of medicines Coordination and control Photosynthesis Ecosystems Inheritance, variation and evolution The genome and gene expression Science Home Page “Striving for Excellence” Exit Back to Core Subjects Page

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The Core Subjects Previous Page The Timeline Home The EBacc Subject Pages FAQs Application Contact us About The Curriculum Work Related Learning BTEC Please browse department areas by clicking on a subject on the Subject Page or scroll through using the Next and Previous Page buttons in the top bar. Work Related Learning is a compulsory lesson for all students in year 10 and 11. Students currently follow a course in BTEC Workskills, which results in the equivalent of 1 GCSE at grade B. The course is about experiencing a wide range of work skills in practice and theory. The course will support you as you decide upon a future career. You will gain the opportunity to be involved with activities which will develop your communication, problem solving and team working skills, as well as taking part in a two week work placement and completing a mock interview. The course provides students with an insight into the world of work and equips them with the necessary skills and qualities to be successful in the modern working world Students complete a portfolio of work covering a number of units, such as: Searching for a job Applying for a job Managing your money Preparing for a work placement Working in a team “Striving for Excellence” Exit Back to Core Subjects Page

93 FAQs More FAQs The Options Process Exit “Striving for Excellence”
The Timeline Home The EBacc Subject Pages FAQs Next Page Application Contact us About The Curriculum FAQs If you have any question that is not answered here please contact us. How many subjects can I choose? What do I do if I miss the application window? All students choose 5 subjects, of which they will study 3 next year. For more information please navigate to the About page. Don’t worry. Please contact us as soon as possible. Can I study a second language or humanities if I choose the EBac route? Yes, but we would always encourage as broad a choice as possible. Will I get my top choices? We will do all we can to ensure that you get your choices in order of preference but we cannot guarantee this for all students. Do I have to study for an EBac? No. Our curriculum allows freedom to choose any combination of subjects from our subject pages if the EBac is not for you. More FAQs “Striving for Excellence” Exit

94 FAQs Previous FAQs Page The Options Process Exit
Previous Page The Timeline Home The EBacc Subject Pages FAQs Application Contact us About The Curriculum FAQs If you have any question that is not answered here please contact us. Can I get an EBac at Shirley High School? Yes. Please navigate to the English Baccalaureate page. When and where do I get my unique username and password? On Tuesday 28th April at the options evening. What core subjects will I study? What if I change my mind? Please visit the Core Subjects page. Please contact the school as soon as possible. Any changes will need to be submitted in writing. Previous FAQs Page “Striving for Excellence” Exit


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