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+ Instructional Design Models TIE 300 Fall 2012 Online Module October 25, 2012.

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Presentation on theme: "+ Instructional Design Models TIE 300 Fall 2012 Online Module October 25, 2012."— Presentation transcript:

1 + Instructional Design Models TIE 300 Fall 2012 Online Module October 25, 2012

2 + Do You Recognize This?

3 + Have You Taken One of These?

4 + At the beginning of each school year hundreds of teachers across grade levels give their new class “Student Interest Surveys.” Teachers are curious to learn as much as they can about their new students in order to see how they learn best. By doing so, teachers are beginning the process of Instructional Design

5 + What is Instructional Design? Instructional Design is the practice of creating “instructional experiences which make the acquisition of knowledge and skills more efficient, effective, and appealing.” (Wikipedia) Instructional Design is the systematic development of instructional specifications using learning and instructional theory to ensure the quality of instruction. It is the entire process of analysis or learning needs and goals and the development of a delivery system to meet those needs. (University of Michigan) Instructional Design involves: knowing your students, what they already know, and knowing what methods work best in teaching them

6 + Does Instructional Design Look the Same for Everyone? Instructional Design looks different in different organizations. For example, it looks different in K-12 education then it does in the government, the military, or within corporations Instructional Designers must take care to be aware of the organization’s goals, rules, policies, and available materials. In education teachers act as Instructional Designers. As teachers, we look at the following to aide our Instructional Design: Standards Assessments Time Goals Curriculum The needs of our learners

7 + Instructional Design Models There are several different models and methods that have been developed and implemented over the years ADDIE Model Dick & Carey Model Kemp’s Instructional Model Merrill’s First Principles of Instruction

8 + Created by M. David Merrill, these principles are used to identify good instructional design, regardless of teaching strategy. The 5 Principles are: Task/Problem: students learn when instruction centers around real-world tasks or problems Activation: students learn when prior knowledge is activated Demonstration: students learn when new knowledge is demonstrated to them in the context of real world problems Application: students learn when they perform real world tasks and receive feedback Integration: students learn when they integrate new knowledge into their existing world

9 + Dick and Carey Systems Approach Model Originally published by Walter Dick and Lou Carey in 1978 The approach to this model is to see instruction as an entire system (as opposed to looking at it as the sum of isolated parts) It focuses on the interrelationship between: Context Content Learing Instruction

10 + Dick and Carey Model

11 + Kemp’s Instructional Model Developed by Jerold Kemp Defines 9 different components of instructional design and a continuous implementation/evaluation model The key to Kemp’s model is that it is a continuous model that requires planning, design, development and assessment The 9 components are: Identify instructional problems and specify goals Examine learner characteristics Identify subject content and analyze task components related to goals State instructional objectives for the learner Sequence content within each instructional unit Design instructional strategies so each learn can master content Plan the instructional message and delivery Develop evaluation instruments to assess objectives Select resources to support instruction and learning activities

12 + Illustration of Kemp Model

13 + The A.D.D.I.E. Model

14 + The A.D.D.I.E. Model is thought to be one of the most commonly used models for creating instructional materials It contains 5 phases: Analysis Design Development Implementation Evaluation Each phase has its own sub-set of tasks We’ll focus most of our attention in this module on understanding each phase and demonstrating how to apply the A.D.D.I.E. model

15 + Analysis Design Development Implementation Evaluation There are 4 parts to the Analysis phase: 1. Development of Instructional Goals: what is it you want your students to learn? 2. Instructional Analysis: what are all of the steps needed to carry out the objectives and meet the goals? 3. Learner Analysis: what do your students already know how to do? What knowledge on the subject do they already have that doesn’t need to be taught? Surveys and questionnaires can be given to determine this 4. Learning Objectives: what should your students be able to do when instruction is complete? “By the time my students finish this lesson they should be able to________________.” Strong Verbs: describe/demonstrate/show/explain

16 + Analysis Design Development Implementation Evaluation Please watch this video now: s4U

17 + Analysis Design Development Implementation Evaluation The Design phase is the second phase in the A.D.D.I.E. model. It has 3 components: 1. Design Assessments: it’s important to know how you will assess if your instruction was effective. Keep the following in mind when designing assessments: What are your goals? What do your learners already know? Try to teach in context and appropriate settings (for example, if you are teaching how to create a PowerPoint slide show it makes sense to teach your learners in a computer lab where they can demonstrate practice and knowledge) Make sure assessments are written clearly and grammatically correct. No trick questions! You are testing your student’s skill knowledge, not their test-taking ability

18 + Analysis Design Development Implementation Evaluation 2. Choose a Course Format: what delivery system(s) will you use to deliver your instruction? Examples include: In Class Lecture Online module like this one Self paced workbook Webinars Blended learning (a combination of different formats)

19 + Analysis Design Development Implementation Evaluation 3. Instructional Strategy: how will you deliver your instruction? Examples include: Lectures Readings Discussions Projects Worksheets Activities Group work Things to keep in mind: how will you motivate your learners? How will you illustrate your objectives? Make sure your content is concise. Will your learners participate and practice? Will you provide feedback?

20 + Analysis Design Development Implementation Evaluation Please watch this video now: QyTo

21 + Analysis Design Development Implementation Evaluation The Development phase is where you will create and assemble your content After developing all of your content be sure to complete a run-through Its important to look back at your Leaner analysis- you need to know what your students already know so you don’t waste instructional time repeating content

22 + Analysis Design Development Implementation Evaluation Please watch this video now: NWhQWYA

23 + Analysis Design Development Implementation Evaluation While the Implementation phase is where you will deliver instruction there are some tasks that need to be complete in order to do so 1. Train the Instructor: in most instances the teacher will be developing and implementing the content. If this isn’t the case this is when you would train the person delivering instruction 2. Prepare Learners: make sure your students are ready for instruction. Are there prerequisites they need? Do they need to attend any orientation before they receive your content? 3. Arrange the Learning Space: gather any materials you will need to complete your instruction. If using technology be sure to TEST IT FIRST to make sure it will work! Don’t wait until you have students in front of you!

24 + Analysis Design Development Implementation Evaluation Please watch this video now: 6-P1Uw

25 + Analysis Design Development Implementation Evaluation There are two parts to evaluation: formative and summative Formative Evaluation: you should be evaluating your instructional materials and objectives as you go. Is everything you are doing planned toward meeting the goal objectives? Summative Evaluation: tests that show whether content was mastered. There are different areas to be evaluated Reaction: how did the students respond to your content? Surveys can be used for this phase. Consider open ended questions as well Learning: posttest tests. Multiple choice, performances, questionnaires Behavior: with training, this is performance within a setting

26 + Analysis Design Development Implementation Evaluation Please watch this video now:

27 + Module Assignment Please demonstrate your knowledge of the A.D.D.I.E. model Create a lesson plan with the following components (you may add additional components as well): 1. Grade Level/Subject Area/Title of lesson 2. Goals of lesson (could be Illinois State Standards or Common Core State Standards) 3. Learner Analysis: what skills do your students need to have prior to your instruction to be successful? 4. Learning Objectives: what should your students be able to do after you have instructed them? “Students will be able to…” 5. Delivery System: how will you deliver instruction? 6. Instructional Activities: What strategies and activities will you use? *Please note: there must be a technology component to your lesson 7. Materials needed for instruction 8. Evaluation: how will you evaluate your students learning? Please include all worksheets/surveys/rubrics or other relevant materials

28 + Module Assignment Your lesson plan may be A word processing document A wiki with separate pages for each component A PowerPoint presentation A link to your lesson plan must be uploaded to the “Instructional Design Models” page on our class wiki no later than November 1, 2012

29 + References styles.shtml dels.htm design-11-the-kemp-model/ design-11-the-kemp-model/


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