Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Making MBTI Feedback more memorable and meaningful

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "Making MBTI Feedback more memorable and meaningful"— Presentation transcript:

1 Making MBTI Feedback more memorable and meaningful
Handout: No ® Myers-Briggs Type Indicator, Myers-Briggs, MBTI and the MBTI logo are registered trade marks of the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator Trust. OPP Ltd is licensed to use the trade marks in Europe.

2 Who am I? Implementation and Development Manager at OPP
22 years’ experience in training and development.  Course manager for the MBTI Qualification workshop throughout Europe for several years Part of the project team involved in the recent redesign of feedback materials in the UK.

3 Findings from 2012 CorpU research
CorpU (Corporate University Xchange) a global leadership research firm recently completed a study called “Leadership 2012”. Included Volvo (Sweden) and Nokia (Finland) & 71 other global companies 97% of these organisations said they were concerned about leadership bench strength One recommendation was to implement or update existing Leadership Development Programmes Source:

4 Challenge to today’s Leaders (themes)
Work is increasingly more complex Knowledge & expertise more widely distributed within organisations Span of control increasing (more people managed with fewer resources) Increasingly diverse workforce to lead Increasingly dispersed workforce (over different continents and timezones) Increasing pace of change Leaders increasingly expected to influence stakeholders outside traditional hierarchy

5 What are they Doing about it?
Over half of the companies surveyed by CorpU had “completely” or “significantly” changed their Leadership programmes in the last 2 years McKinsey’s Lowell Bryan & Claudia Jones recently commented in “Mobilizing Minds, Creating Wealth from Talent in the 21st Century Organisation” that many failing organisations aren’t refreshing their leadership models Is the MBTI still relevant to today’s Leaders? Cue Supertramp!

6 What is effective Leadership?
Effective Leadership is still all about behaviour To enhance effectiveness, leaders need to fully understand their own behaviour and to recognise and employ the range of behaviours available to them

7 So what are Leaders expected to do?
N Setting a clear direction and vision and communicate it clearly Analysing management information and making good, considered decisions Building relationships between all types of people that engender trust and respect Being adaptable and open to change Being aware of their own and others’ strengths and delegating successfully Embracing diversity and encouraging healthy conflict S T I J E F P Lencioni

8 Blake & Mouton Managerial Grid
Example that leaders need skills in both sides of dichotomies

9 How can MBTI help? While there are greater concentrations of certain Types among leaders, growing evidence suggests no best Type for a Leader Best Leaders are aware of their own style and can skillfully adapt to other styles when necessary Leaders need to be authentic Their time is precious – making feedback meaningful is important Conclusion : we need a new refreshing way of delivering MBTI to encourage development of all dichotomies

10 Recommended Improvements
More emphasis on applying all preferences effectively and appropriately rather than over-emphasis on Best-Fit Type More emphasis on bringing MBTI to life and linking with business applications. Go further: develop simple action plans for personal development. For each preference exercise or discussion, emphasise individual development in both ends of the dichotomy to give Leaders flexibility of behaviour.

11 New Style MBTI® Step I Feedback
© Copyright OPP Ltd All rights reserved. ® Myers-Briggs Type Indicator, Myers-Briggs, MBTI and the MBTI logo are registered trade marks of the MBTI Trust, Inc. in the United States and other countries. OPP Ltd is licensed to use the trade marks in Europe.

12 Purpose is more important
Giving a greater focus on WHY an individual is completing the MBTI at the beginning prevents the “SO WHAT?” moment at the end Encouraging individuals to “own” personal reasons for doing MBTI leads them to look for relevant applications themselves throughout the feedback Recording these allows you to refer back to these applications at the end of the feedback and suggest further work with you Handout: Yes Emphasise that discussing the respondent’s purpose at the start is really important. The more the feedback is geared toward applications valued by the client, the more they will get out of the process.

13 How a workbook can achieve this
On page 3 of the MBTI workbook there is a list of nine areas where the MBTI instrument can really add value to performance. Clients are encouraged to tick those areas that especially apply to them in their role. On the next page they are encouraged to further personalise these issues Handout: Yes

14 General application areas
Improving working relationships Developing your leadership style Improving communication Improving problem-solving strategies Resolving conflict Managing change Understanding stress reactions Valuing diversity in working style Considering team and organisational culture Handout: Yes

15 Use of Colour EXTRAVERSION INTROVERSION SENSING INTUITION THINKING
Where you prefer to get and focus your energy EXTRAVERSION INTROVERSION The kind of information you prefer to gather and trust SENSING INTUITION The process you prefer to use in coming to decisions THINKING FEELING Handout: Yes Invite the EI group to present the preference pair. How you prefer to deal with the world around you JUDGING PERCEIVING

16 Exploring personal examples
In one to one feedbacks, the practitioner can use the cards to encourage discussion of typical examples of the MBTI dichotomies In group feedback this is the biggest moment of challenge – there is one of you and many of them – how do you encourage a discussion of personal examples and debrief these with MBTI expertise? We need some way to give your clients the MBTI expertise to ask and debrief open questions amongst themselves without being dependent on you Try using a structured exercise eg scratchcards Detailed instructions in the User Guide, p.45 Ask delegates to work in pairs and take 1 pack of scratchcards between two. If there is an odd number, then the trainer can ask questions for one delegate. Each person should pick two scratchcards for this preference pair, featuring topics relevant to them. It is a good idea to choose one work‐based scenario and one home‐based scenario, to avoid the effect of work or organisational pressure. One of you should start by posing the questions on the scratchcard to your partner. Once your partner has responded, try to have a little discussion about their answer and the reasons behind it. Then read out the two alternative answers on the scratchcard, and ask your partner which of the options sounds most like their personal response. The silver patch can then be scratched off to reveal which preference has been used in that situation. When all three questions on a card have been scratched off, the result will either be 3–0 or 2–1 towards one or other of the preferences. Repeat this with the person’s second scratchcard. If the two cards contradict each other, a third card can be chosen for the participant to explore this preference further. The exercise is then repeated for the other person. There are enough cards for every participant to choose three cards for each dichotomy.

17 Scratchcards Get into pairs and pretend you know nothing about MBTI
Each person picks two scratchcards (one about work and one about home). Their partner discusses and probes each question Then they both scratch off the silver spot on the side that best fits their answer. Detailed instructions in the User Guide, p.45 Ask delegates to work in pairs and take 1 pack of scratchcards between two. If there is an odd number, then the trainer can ask questions for one delegate. Each person should pick two scratchcards for this preference pair, featuring topics relevant to them. It is a good idea to choose one work‐based scenario and one home‐based scenario, to avoid the effect of work or organisational pressure. One of you should start by posing the questions on the scratchcard to your partner. Once your partner has responded, try to have a little discussion about their answer and the reasons behind it. Then read out the two alternative answers on the scratchcard, and ask your partner which of the options sounds most like their personal response. The silver patch can then be scratched off to reveal which preference has been used in that situation. When all three questions on a card have been scratched off, the result will either be 3–0 or 2–1 towards one or other of the preferences. Repeat this with the person’s second scratchcard. If the two cards contradict each other, a third card can be chosen for the participant to explore this preference further. The exercise is then repeated for the other person. There are enough cards for every participant to choose three cards for each dichotomy.

18 Recording personal examples
In the workbook, on page 15, there is space to make a note of the exploration of Extraversion and Introversion from the scratchcards. For one to one feedback this will be a record of the examples from the feedback cards. Handout: Yes

19 Making it memorable Giving people an actual experience of using BOTH poles of the dichotomy will make it more memorable – especially to kinaesthetic learners Typical exercises are designed by splitting up the group into two groups (eg Extraverts and Introverts) and comparing their responses to an event or question If we design exercises that encourage everyone to experience BOTH preferences then it will have higher impact People who don’t know their Best Fit Type can benefit as much as those who do!

20 Exercise to experience both E & I
Pick up five ‘talk tokens’ each. As a group, choose a talk topic card from the pack. Have a group discussion about your chosen topic. Whenever you talk you must give up one token! You should each aim to use all your talk tokens. Handout: Yes Detailed instructions in the User Guide, p.47 Materials needed Group selector marbles and bag, ‘Talk topic’ cards, Talk tokens (chips) Instructions Put the talk tokens in a big pile somewhere accessible. “Please pick up five talk tokens each.” Divide the team up into groups of four to seven people using the group selector marbles. Get each group to find a space in the room and sit with their chairs in a circle facing inwards, or around a table. Give each group a set of ‘Talk topic’ cards. “Each group should choose one card from the pack. It’s up to you whether you shuffle the cards and pick one at random, or whether you decide on a topic together.” Don’t spend too much time choosing the topic rather than completing the exercise! “You should now have a discussion about your group’s topic. Whenever you talk, you have to throw one token into the middle of the group.” “Even if you say ‘yes’ or ‘uhuh’ you must throw in a token. If someone forgets to give up a token, other members of the group can remind them by clicking their fingers and pointing at the person who spoke. Clicking fingers does not need a token! Off you go!” After six minutes stop the exercise.

21 Debrief: Not simply Es use up more tokens
Did you see both Extraversion and Introversion in action? Did you experience both yourself? Encouraging clients to record any interesting findings (eg page 15 of the workbook) encourages a commitment to act upon the findings This should lead to further work with your client  Handout: Yes Suggested questions “Did you speak more or less than you would have without the tokens?” “Did you find it easy to use Introversion when you were listening to each speaker and preparing what to say?” “Did you feel constrained by the token system?” “Would you have preferred to use more Extraversion by interrupting and being free to comment without of the need to prepare your thoughts?” “What was your attitude to the tokens? Did you hold them back and save them or did you wish you had more?” Transferring the learning “How did you feel when you were using Extraversion and Introversion in this task?” “When in your role do you rely on Extraversion?” “Where do you have an opportunity to appropriately use Extraversion more?” “When in your role do you rely on Introversion?” “Where do you have an opportunity to appropriately use Introversion more?”

22 Dealing with Reported Type
A more Adult approach to giving out Reported Type is to not keep it secret until the end Giving the individual Reported Type data as they are considering each dichotomy allows a “Best Fit” of each dichotomy as we go along Page 16 of the workbook has E/I Reported Type written in (by you beforehand!) This has been copied from the MBTI report The scale of preference score has been replaced by boxes to avoid the idea of trait Handout: Yes If someone’s preference is obvious at this stage, they can enter it in the book. If they are unsure, then they can leave it blank and revisit it at the end.

23 Applying Extraversion and Introversion
After each dichotomy, encourage clients to apply their learning to their roles at work. The workbook could have a space for this This will be especially important for Leaders as we have already stressed that Leaders need to develop BOTH sides of each dichotomy to be effective Handout: Yes

24 Let’s see, if I distract him with my rook, he’ll never suspect I’m going to pin his knight, threaten his queen, and force him to sacrifice his bishop. He’ll never notice my exposed king! Checkmate! How come you INTROVERTED cats beat me every time? Luck? Handout: No

25 The four dimensions of type
Where you prefer to get and focus your energy EXTRAVERSION INTROVERSION The kind of information you prefer to gather and trust SENSING INTUITION The process you prefer to use in coming to decisions THINKING FEELING Handout: Yes Invite the SN group to present the preference pair. How you prefer to deal with the world around you JUDGING PERCEIVING

26 Exercise to experience S & N
This exercise involves discussing topics first in a Sensing way, then in an iNtuitive way. Clients will experience both but will find one (either S or N) more easy to use and also to listen to Detailed instructions on p.49 Materials needed: ‘Money’ and ‘Food’ cards Instructions: Give out the packs of cards so half the people have ‘Money’ cards and half have ‘Food’ cards. If you have an odd number of people, you will need to join in yourself to make up the numbers. “Look at your chosen topic: half of you have ‘Money’ and the other half have ‘Food’. You’ll notice you have two very different versions of a script to talk about your topic: a green S and a yellow N card. You will have 90 seconds to talk to a colleague using the green S card, then 90 seconds to talk through the yellow N card. You have two minutes to familiarise yourself with the two different versions and to write notes on the cards about what you might say. Go!” Give a one‐minute warning so they can spend equal time preparing on each card. After the two minutes of preparation time say: “Put your hand up if you have a ‘Food’ card. Now, everyone with a ‘Money’ card should pair up with a person with a ‘Food’ card.” “Now, the person with the ‘Money’ card should talk to their partner for 90 seconds using the Sensing preference. The notes on your green card will help you to do this. Go!” After 90 seconds say: “Okay stop! Now the same people should spend 90 seconds talking about the same topic, but this time using iNtuition – your yellow card will help you to do this. Go!” After 90 seconds say: “Now discuss with your partner – what was the difference in speaking about (or listening to) each version? Invite people to swap pairs and repeat the exercise with the other partner talking about the food card.

27 Look! A dead mouse! To me it represents the eternal struggle to survive in this cruel world. It’s a symbol of despair, cruelty, and hopelessness. What does it represent to you Fluffy? A tasty snack!

28 The four dimensions of type
Where you prefer to get and focus your energy EXTRAVERSION INTROVERSION The kind of information you prefer to gather and trust SENSING INTUITION The process you prefer to use in coming to decisions THINKING FEELING Handout: Yes Invite the TF group to present the preference pair. How you prefer to deal with the world around you JUDGING PERCEIVING

29 Exercise to “see things” both T & F
Wearing the glasses, look at the different scenarios “through the eyes” of Thinking and Feeling. Notice the different emphasis each preference places on the same decisions. What do you notice are the main differences in these different decision-making styles? Read the scenarios without glasses and notice how much more well-rounded your responses would be if you paid attention to both T and F! Detailed instructions in User Guide, p.51 Materials needed Red and blue glasses Web page “See things through my eyes” (Accessed by scanning in the QR code on the glasses using a QR reader app on your mobile device or tablet) Enough light emitting screens e.g. laptops, phones or ipads for viewing the file in colour on screen. Run this exercise over the break to allow for everyone to have a look when there are limited displays. “Read the first story on the web page ‘See things through my eyes’ on a colour screen, while wearing the BLUE and then the RED glasses. Notice whether the BLUE or RED glasses give you a THINKING or FEELING view of the situation. Circle the correct letter on the glasses (or cross out the wrong letter).” “Then read the page without glasses for a version of the same story that includes both a THINKING and FEELING perspective.”

30 Working Relationships
At work I like to be appreciated - recognised - for what I produce, who I am as a person and what I put of myself into my role and my competence. Constant encouragement from my boss can be sometimes motivating as it sometimes shows they are interested in my contribution sometimes intrusive and smothering, making me think that they don’t trust me. I like to be appreciated - recognised - by experts who know what they’re talking about, people who work closely with me and know about my contribution in terms of motivating others knowledge and skills, particularly those with status in the organisation. If someone criticises me I sometimes don’t have time to ask “who are you to criticise me?” If they are qualified to comment through expertise or status I can feel immediately crushed as if I have been personally attacked, I feel hurt. I will work hard to correct mistakes I may have made, regain trust to improve my competence mend any damaged relationships. I like to give others praise, constructive criticism because it motivates others gives an opportunity to increase performance.

31 Accepting TENDER LOGICAL Analytical Compassionate Objective Soft Tough
Task-focussed CARING LOGICAL Detached Objective Analytical Critical Accepting People-focussed Compassionate Empathetic TENDER Subjective Reasonable HARD Soft Warm Questioning Collaborative

32 Gosh. You must feel awful
Gosh! You must feel awful. Don’t worry, I’ll go and make you a lovely cup of tea. Gnasher, the evil Rottweiler has tied me here! X When the train comes I’ll be squished! HELP ME! OVER HERE! What’s the problem? Handout: No

33 The four dimensions of type
Where you prefer to get and focus your energy EXTRAVERSION INTROVERSION The kind of information you prefer to gather and trust SENSING INTUITION The process you prefer to use in coming to decisions THINKING FEELING Handout: Yes How you prefer to deal with the world around you JUDGING PERCEIVING

34 Exercise to experience both J & P
Collect a pack of modelling clay and share it out. As a group, plan and build a model of a park. You can only touch your own colour clay. You have only 6 minutes Detailed instructions in User Guide, p.55 Materials needed: Group selector marbles and bag, Modelling clay (8 colours), Googly eyes Instructions Divide the team up into groups of between four and seven people using the group selector marbles. When the groups have been sorted out, get each group to find a space in the room, sitting around a table with a set of modelling clay. “Share out the modelling clay so each person has one or two colours.Your task as a group is to build a model of a park (children’s playground, town park or theme park) in only eight minutes, using up all the clay. Each person can only use their own colours and cannot give their colours to anyone else, so the group must co‐operate to plan which parts each person should make.” Start them off and start your stopwatch (or look at your clock). After six minutes shout: “I’ve changed my mind. I want each group to make a parrot instead. Everyone can now use any colour they want. Use up all the clay. You have only two minutes left!” Give out a pair of googly eyes to each group for their parrot. At 1 minute 50 seconds, give a 10 second countdown to increase the tension, then stop the exercise.

35 I know I said I’d take you skiing, but the surf’s up in Australia, let’s go there instead!
Handout: No

36 Pulling together your whole type
There is still great significance to understanding your Best Fit Type so this is the place to do it Your client will already have benefitted from applying what they have learned, so if they can’t decide their Best Fit it isn’t quite so bad You will already have demonstrated the value of MBTI (and the value that you have added of course!) Handout: No These are the remainder of the group feedback PPT. You can show these slides, but don’t actually take them through this content at this stage.

37 Action planning Getting your client to write down action plans commits them to action You could keep a record and remind them at agreed milestones These actions could give you a starting point to suggest further work with your clients Handout: No These are the remainder of the group feedback PPT. You can show these slides, but don’t actually take them through this content at this stage.

38 Introduction to Type® Isabel Briggs Myers
Available in 11 European languages Handout: No

39 MBTI Step I application reports
Communication Style Report Decision-making Style Report Team Report (Swedish) Conflict Style Report Stress Management Report Career Report Handout: Yes

40 Relevant Resources Just launching MBTI Interpretive Report for Organisations in Finnish (already available in Swedish) Introduction to Type and Leadership (English only) Firo-B with MBTI Leadership report in English and Swedish Firo-B business Leadership report in English and Swedish

41 Leave them with possible next steps
The back of the workbook shows possible next steps. Why not create your own highlighting the services and further resources you or Assessio can offer your clients (eg coaching, Firo-B, TKI)?

42 Summary Using colour, fun activities, cards, workbooks etc. makes the experience more memorable Using exercises and having discussions that explore BOTH poles of a dichotomy allows full participation from clients who are unsure of Best Fit Type and allows even these to plan self-development Making the whole feedback more meaningful will engage your client right from the first meeting and help them to see the value of working with you further

43 Let the MBTI framework help you to make a difference!


Download ppt "Making MBTI Feedback more memorable and meaningful"

Similar presentations


Ads by Google