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Climbing the Data Ladder Measures of Academic Progress ® (MAP ® ) Lexile and Lexile Analyzer are registered trademarks of MetaMetrics, Inc. NWEA is neither.

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Presentation on theme: "Climbing the Data Ladder Measures of Academic Progress ® (MAP ® ) Lexile and Lexile Analyzer are registered trademarks of MetaMetrics, Inc. NWEA is neither."— Presentation transcript:

1 Climbing the Data Ladder Measures of Academic Progress ® (MAP ® ) Lexile and Lexile Analyzer are registered trademarks of MetaMetrics, Inc. NWEA is neither affiliated nor associated with MetaMetrics, Inc. The names of other companies and their products mentioned are the trademarks of their respective owners. There is no relationship or association between NWEA and those companies and products referred in this presentation.

2 Setting the Stage  Welcome/introductions  Structure for the day  Materials review R A M Materials Reports Activity Web Resources W M A Virtual Observation V 2

3 Activate Prior Knowledge 1.Measures of Academic Progress ® (MAP ® ) as an adaptive growth measure 2.Student RIT scores 3.RIT scale 4.Normative Data 5.RIT to Reading Range Reports 6.DesCartes: A Continuum of Learning ® 7.Primary Grades Instructional Data 8.Instructional level A 3

4 Sustaining the Momentum  Consider how you will implement what you’ve learned in the:  Next month  Next semester  Next year M 4

5 Terry Planner My Building xx/xx/xxxx Schedule meeting to plan for sharing/ teaching other teachers key concepts: Share Differentiation video clips Build Instructional Ladder Lessons with grade level teams Schedule meeting with my principal to discuss this info and plan Me Paula Principal Workbook from this workshop Finding available time/Schedule over lunch xx/xx/xxxx Other teacher leaders, grade/ department heads and me Workbook from this workshop Sustaining the Momentum document Hectic schedules/ be persistent and prioritize– this is important! xx/xx/xxxx Other teacher leaders, grade/ department heads and me Sustaining the Momentum Planning Document 5

6 Topics for Today Instructional Ladders Differentiated Instruction Differentiated Instruction

7 Supporting Differentiation  Assessing resource needs  Developing collegial conversations  Structuring next steps 7

8 Intended Accomplishments  Explore key principles of differentiated instruction  Investigate and evaluate practices for differentiating content and process  Develop strategies to support differentiation  Discuss managing the differentiated classroom Differentiated Instruction Workbook p. 1 M A 8

9 Taking Stock 1. I’m committed to offering a variety of opportunities for my students to learn how they learn best. 2. I’m comfortable using many instructional strategies in my classroom Disagree Somewhat Disagree Neutral Somewhat Agree Agree A 9

10 - Carol Ann Tomlinson “Differentiation is classroom practice that looks eyeball to eyeball with the reality that kids differ, and the most effective teachers do whatever it takes to hook the whole range of kids on learning.” Differentiated Instruction Workbook p. 1 M

11 Differentiated Instruction A teacher’s response to learners’ needs is guided by three key principles of differentiation Respectful tasks Flexible grouping Ongoing assessment & adjustment Source: The Differentiated Classroom, Tomlinson 1999 Differentiated Instruction Workbook p. 1 M 11

12 According to Student’s Through a Range of Instructional and Management Strategies Source: The Differentiated Classroom, Tomlinson 1999 Content Process Product Interests Readiness Learning Profile Teachers Can Differentiate

13 Virtual Observation: Content Differentiation  How do these teachers meet the diverse needs of their students? A M Differentiated Instruction Workbook p. 2 V 13

14 Content Differentiation  Pose questions for relevance and focus  Use data to identify learners’ needs  Adjust instruction frequently  Student work  Classroom observation  Keep learning objectives clearly in focus 14

15 Using Reading Ranges to Differentiate  Provide data to inform instructional decisions  Assist in identifying resources that support differentiated instruction 15

16 Dynamic Reporting Suite 16

17 Dynamic Reporting Suite: RIT to Reading Range Report Differentiated Instruction Workbook p. 2 M 17

18 Dynamic Reporting Suite: Student Booklist 18 Differentiated Instruction Workbook p. 3 M W

19 Reading Ranges Across Content Areas  Mathematics  Science  Social Studies 19

20 Virtual Observation: Using Lexiles ® to Differentiate  How can using Reading Range data support better learning for all students? A Differentiated Instruction Workbook p. 3 M V 20

21 Differentiating Tom Sawyer Student Reading Range The Adventures of Tom Sawyer [Various Text/ Authors] Lexile ® Kulling, Monica Suter, Joanne Twain, Mark Twain, Mark950 21

22 Tiered Reading Resources  Student Reading Ranges can be used to create a tiered reading resource that supports the teaching of a specific standard. Differentiated Instruction Workbook p. 4 M 22

23 Process Differentiation Structure of the Activity Format of the Discussion Learning Materials Detailed directionsInquiry driven with few directions Teacher-led with modeling Discussion questions provided Word problems and hypothetical situations Manipulatives and concrete examples Differentiated Instruction Workbook p. 5 M A 23

24 Virtual Observation: Flexible Grouping… A M Differentiated Instruction Workbook p. 6 V Within the classroom Across the grade In multiple grades 24

25 Options for Regrouping  Students show indicators of content mastery  Students work in preferred learning styles  Students work in areas of high interest Improved Student Achievement Learning Objectives and State Standards Learning Style Groups New Readiness Groups Interest Groups 25

26 Assessing Student Learning Profiles and Interests  Observation  Teacher-created assessments  Resources on the Internet M W 26

27 Virtual Observation: Managing the Differentiated Classroom  Physical space  Activities and work time  Supervision A M Differentiated Instruction Workbook p. 6 V 27

28 Managing the Differentiated Classroom  Involve students  Put everything in writing  Post early bird list  Provide anchoring activities  Grade selectively  Schedule quiet days Differentiated Instruction Workbook p. 7 M 28

29 Strategies for the Differentiated Classroom  Anchoring activities  Learning contracts  Tiered assignments  Curriculum compacting A Differentiated Instruction Workbook pp. 7-9 M 29

30 Approaches to Differentiation  Lo-Prep Differentiation  Varying Text  Anchoring  Tiered Homework  Hi-Prep Differentiation  Curriculum Compacting  Tiered Assignments  Laddered Thematic Units Differentiated Instruction Workbook p. 9 M 30

31 Virtual Observation: Talking with Students  Address starting point - not ability  Identify strengths / Target missing skills  Focus on growth for all Differentiated Instruction Workbook p. 10 M A V 31

32 Make a “One-Degree Shift”  Consider differentiating only a SINGLE element  Projects  Discussion questions  Homework 32

33 Virtual Observation: Benefits of Differentiation  Growth becomes a visible part of classroom culture  Increased engagement = decreased discipline issues  Increases student ownership for learning  Engages reluctant learners Differentiated Instruction Workbook p. 10 M V 33

34 Sustaining the Momentum  Consider how you will implement what you’ve learned:  Explore key principles of differentiated instruction  Investigate and evaluate practices for differentiating content and process  Develop strategies to support effective differentiation  Discuss managing the differentiated classroom M A Differentiated Instruction Workbook p

35 Topics for Today Instructional Ladders Differentiated Instruction Instructional Ladders

36 Intended Accomplishments  Use standards with DesCartes or Primary Grades Instructional Data  Design instruction to meet diverse needs of learners  Identify and access resources for diverse instructional needs Instructional Ladders Workbook p. 1 M 36

37 Taking Stock Grade-level standards are the focus of all my instruction Disagree Somewhat Disagree Neutral Somewhat Agree Agree A 37

38 Building the Instructional Ladder  Data-informed instructional design  Extended scaffolding  Appropriate entry points Instructional Ladders Workbook pp. 1-2 M A 38

39 Virtual Observation: Laddered Instruction  Content focus  Resources for decision-making  Using DesCartes M A Instructional Ladders Workbook p. 2 V 39

40 What is the “Zone of Proximal Development”?  Match of learners’ level of prior knowledge to new information to produce maximum growth Instructional Ladders Workbook pp. 3-4 M 40

41 Standard Deviation  Smaller standard deviations indicate that students are more alike.  How might this impact instruction?  Larger standard deviations indicate more academic diversity.  How might this impact instruction? 41

42 Determining Instructional Content  Standards  Local curriculum documents  School improvement initiatives  Student academic needs  Triangulation of data Instructional Ladders Workbook p. 5 M 42

43 DesCartes, Primary Grades Instructional Data, and Standards  Placing students on the ladder  Diagnosing key skill deficiencies  Planning for differentiation  Moving students beyond grade-level standards Instructional Ladders Workbook pp. 5-7 M 43

44 Building Instructional Ladders Standard DesCartes or Primary Grades Instructional Data Concept 44

45 Concept  For a concept and its relevant standard, determine: What is it that all of my students know? What is it that most of my students know? What is it that a few of my students know? What is it that none of my students know? Instructional Ladders Workbook p. 8 M 45

46 Standard  The student will use the scientific process to answer questions: What is an experiment? How do you pose a hypothesis? How do you control for a variable? What is the difference between an independent and a dependent variable? Instructional Ladders Workbook p. 8 M 46

47 Standard and DesCartes  Geometry – Properties of two and three dimensional objects (points, rays, lines, and angles including congruency, similarities and transformations) : Identifies right angles : Identifies geometric transformations (rotations) : Understands meaning and representation of a dilation : Identifies symmetry of a sphere None : Identifies figures with line symmetrical parts All Instructional Ladders Workbook p. 8 M 47

48 Instructional Ladder Samples  Science  Mathematics  Reading  Social Studies  Thematic units Instructional Ladders Workbook p. 9 M A 48

49 Previewing the Instructional Ladder 3. Match skills/learning needs to content you will teach 2. Identify RIT bands/skill levels present in your class 1. Identify skill/standard/goal to be addressed in the lesson or unit R Instructional Ladders Workbook p. 9 M 49

50 Building the Instructional Ladder Standard Activity Group 3. Match RIT band to DesCartes statements or Primary Grades Instructional Data for that skill/standard/goal 2. Identify RIT bands present in class 1. Identify skill/standard/goal to be addressed in the lesson or unit A R M Building a Ladder packet pp

51 Building the Instructional Ladder Secondary Activity Group  Developing an Instructional Ladder  Select ladder which matches your content  Highlight RIT ranges that match your Class Breakdown by Goal or Teacher Report  Using Normative Data and State Proficiency Tables  Circle typical performance range  Make a square around state proficiency benchmark range A R M Building a Ladder Packet pp

52 Building the Instructional Ladder Primary Activity Group – Screening/Skills Checklist  Use your Teacher Report to identify the range of skills present in your class  Choose an instructional topic  Identify a series of activities related to the topic you selected  Transfer student names to the ladder template A M R Building a Ladder packet pp

53 Building the Instructional Ladder Primary Activity Group – Survey w/ Goals A M R Building a Ladder packet pp Algebra 53

54 Group Reporting  Share  Observations of student data  Examples of laddered skills  Examples of strategies and approaches Instructional Ladders Workbook p. 10 M A 54

55 Additional Resources for Instructional Ladders   Ladders  Differentiation  Grouping  Rubrics and assessment Instructional Ladders Workbook p. 10 M W 55

56 Assessing Student Growth in Laddered Instruction  Examine in-class assessments and student work through observation  Student self-assessments  Compare fall-to-spring MAP data and reports Instructional Ladders Workbook p. 11 M 56

57 The Goal is For All Students to Move Ahead Red = Beginning of year Green = End of year Class Breakdown by Overall RIT Score Justin B Andrew Neal Billy Chris Tom Alisha Marc Shelby Cody Susannah John Donovan Grant Allison Tyler Randy Chelsea Anna Sydney Ty Justin S Taylor Sarah Justin BAndrew John Chris Alisha Neal Billy Amber Tom James Allison Grant Sydney Marc Shelby Taylor Chelsea Sarah Donovan April Randy Susannah Anna Tyler Ty JustinTaylor 57

58 Resources Instructional Ladders Workbook p. 11 M A - Internet & Beyond - - NWEA Web Site- - Community - - District - - Building - - Teacher - - Classroom - 58

59 Sustaining the Momentum  Consider how you will implement what you’ve learned:  Use standards with DesCartes and Primary Grades Instructional Data  Design instruction to meet diverse needs of learners  Identify and access resources for diverse instructional needs A Instructional Ladder Workbook p. 12 M 59

60 Building Internal Capacity Find Time:  Early release days  Use substitute teachers creatively  Streamline “administrivia” Learn More:  Professional development  Curriculum & data planning teams  Study groups  Data coaches 60

61 Leading High Performing Learning Communities  Mission driven  Culture and ownership  Answerability  Expert use of data  Staff development  Effective instruction  Quality student assessment  Dynamic learning environment  High quality curriculum  Strategic use of resources Culture and Ownership ANSWERABILITY Mission: Growth and Learning for Every Student 61

62 Sustaining the Momentum  What will your realized plan look like?  How will you make the plan visible?  What evidence of success will you see?  How will you celebrate your success? M A 62

63 Help Us Learn From You  Complete the Evaluation Form and leave it in the designated location.  Thanks for your attention and hard work. A M


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