Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Chapter 8: Covalent Bonding Resources: Chapter 8 of our TB and unit 6 of workbook Ch. 8 reading and study guide (in part) Powerpoint used in class Lab.

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "Chapter 8: Covalent Bonding Resources: Chapter 8 of our TB and unit 6 of workbook Ch. 8 reading and study guide (in part) Powerpoint used in class Lab."— Presentation transcript:

1 Chapter 8: Covalent Bonding Resources: Chapter 8 of our TB and unit 6 of workbook Ch. 8 reading and study guide (in part) Powerpoint used in class Lab practical: Molecular models Handouts: practice problems and naming of covalent/molecular compounds Animations and simulation Simulations and animations: Ionic and covalent bonding animation: cCvzWwww cCvzWwww Animation and song: what kinds of bonds are these: BzyM6TcK8 Mark Rosengarten video tutorials on polarity of molecules: RgeBSe1o8&feature=related glencoe animations and interactive lesson: hill.com/sites/ /student_vie w0/chapter9/concepts_in_motion.html # Animation: Ionic compounds versus nonpolar and polar molecules Properties of ionic and covalent compounds:

2 End Show © Copyright Pearson Prentice Hall Molecular Compounds > Slide 2 of 18 Molecules and Molecular Compounds In nature, matter takes many forms. The noble gases, including helium and neon, are monatomic. That means they exist as single atoms. Represented by symbols: He, Ne, etc) the noble gases are not molecules 8.1

3 End Show © Copyright Pearson Prentice Hall Molecular Compounds > Slide 3 of 18 Molecules and Molecular Compounds A molecule is a neutral group of atoms joined together by covalent bonds. Air contains oxygen molecules. A diatomic molecule is a molecule consisting of two atoms. An oxygen molecule is a diatomic molecule. 8.1

4 End Show © Copyright Pearson Prentice Hall Molecular Compounds > Slide 4 of 18 Molecules and Molecular Compounds Some elements do exist as diatomic molecules. Hydrogen H 2 (g) Oxygen O 2 (g) Fluorine F 2 (g) Bromine Br 2 (l) Iodine I 2 (s) Nitrogen N 2 (g) Chlorine Cl 2 (g) 8.1

5 End Show © Copyright Pearson Prentice Hall Molecular Compounds > Slide 5 of 18 Molecules and Molecular Compounds Pneumonic device to remember those elements that exist in nature as diatomic molecules.? (HOFBrINCl) (write out symbols, add 2 as a subscript) H O F Br I N Cl H 2 O 2 F 2 Br 2 I 2 N 2 Cl 2 ( note these are molecules but they are not compounds ) 8.1

6 End Show © Copyright Pearson Prentice Hall Molecular Compounds > Slide 6 of 18 Molecules and Molecular Compounds A compound composed of molecules is called a molecular compound. Water and carbon monoxide are molecular compounds. 8.1

7 End Show © Copyright Pearson Prentice Hall Molecular Compounds > Slide 7 of 18 Molecular Formulas Formulas of Some Molecular Compounds 8.1

8 End Show © Copyright Pearson Prentice Hall Molecular Compounds > Slide 8 of 18 Molecules and Molecular Compounds 8.1

9 End Show © Copyright Pearson Prentice Hall Molecular Compounds > Slide 9 of 18 Molecular Formulas 8.1 A molecular formula is the chemical formula of a molecular compound. A molecular formula shows how many atoms of each element a molecule contains.

10 End Show © Copyright Pearson Prentice Hall Molecular Compounds > Slide 10 of 18 Molecular Formulas 8.1

11 End Show © Copyright Pearson Prentice Hall Molecular Compounds > Slide 11 of 18 Molecules and Molecular Changes 8.1 Ethane, a component of natural gas, is also a molecular compound.

12 Chapter 8: Covalent Bonding Types of Bonding ? (review)

13 BONDING Sea of electrons model used to explain bonding in metals Kernel & delocalized mobile valence electrons

14 BONDING Electrostatic attraction of negatively and positively charged ions Can be formed as a result of the transfer of electrons between metal and nonmetal atoms to form cations and anions

15 BONDING

16 Types of Bonding

17 Bonding in: Na ? NaCl ? H 2 or Cl 2 ? HCl ? H 2 O ?

18 End Show © Copyright Pearson Prentice Hall Molecular Compounds > Slide 18 of Molecules and Molecular Compounds How are the melting points and boiling points of molecular compounds different from those of ionic compounds?

19 End Show © Copyright Pearson Prentice Hall Molecular Compounds > Slide 19 of 18 Molecules and Molecular Changes Molecular compounds tend to have relatively lower melting and boiling points than ionic compounds. 8.1

20 Practice – properties of ionic and covalent compounds Go to interactive table on Glencoe site: Physical Properties of ionic and covalent compounds hill.com/sites/ /student_view0/chapter9/concepts_in_motion. html#

21 End Show © Copyright Pearson Prentice Hall Slide 21 of 18 Section Quiz -or- Continue to: Launch: Assess students’ understanding of the concepts in Section 8.1 Section Quiz. 8.1.

22 © Copyright Pearson Prentice Hall Slide 22 of 18 End Show 1.Compared to ionic compounds, molecular compounds tend to have relatively a.low melting points and high boiling points. b.low melting points and low boiling points. c.high melting points and high boiling points. d.high melting points and low boiling points. 8.1 Section Quiz.

23 © Copyright Pearson Prentice Hall Slide 23 of 18 End Show 2.A molecular compound usually consists of a.two metal atoms and a nonmetal atom. b.two nonmetal atoms and a metal atom. c.two or more metal atoms. d.two or more nonmetal atoms. 8.1 Section Quiz

24 © Copyright Pearson Prentice Hall Slide 24 of 18 End Show 8.1 Section Quiz 3.A molecular formula shows a.how many atoms of each element a molecule contains. b.a molecule's structure. c.which atoms are bonded together. d.how atoms are arranged in space.


Download ppt "Chapter 8: Covalent Bonding Resources: Chapter 8 of our TB and unit 6 of workbook Ch. 8 reading and study guide (in part) Powerpoint used in class Lab."

Similar presentations


Ads by Google