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Instructor: Bess A. Rose What examples of logic models have you found since the last class? Where did you find them?

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Presentation on theme: "Instructor: Bess A. Rose What examples of logic models have you found since the last class? Where did you find them?"— Presentation transcript:

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2 Instructor: Bess A. Rose

3 What examples of logic models have you found since the last class? Where did you find them?

4 A legislator is calling you…. But first he needs information from program designers, experts, and research.… He has some money he’d like to earmark for your program…. He wants current web-based sources that are credible, accurate, reasonable, and well- supported.

5 Do you take the call? Yes!

6 Today, we are going to learn how to evaluate Internet sources. We’ll use the CARS method developed by Robert Harris He has a great web site:

7  Given a computer with Internet access, participants will locate and evaluate sources, such as program designers’ web site, program curriculum materials, experts, and research-based materials, so that 100% of resources are accurately evaluated in terms of how credible, accurate, reasonable and supported they are.

8 In order to identify inputs and outcomes, we need to start by locating appropriate sources In order to identify inputs and outcomes, we need to start by locating appropriate sources

9  What word has become synonymous with web searches?  Hint: it is both a company name and a verb

10  Adj.: The feeling of being overwhelmed, disoriented, or confused as a result of finding millions of web sites in response to one simple little search request

11  Credibility  Accuracy  Reasonableness  Support

12  Is the source trustworthy?  Who is the author? (Is it a person or an organization?)  Who is the publisher?  What are the author’s credentials?  Is there evidence of quality control?  Is the source a known or respected authority?  Goal: an authoritative source, a source that supplies some good evidence that allows you to trust it. Harris, R. (2007). Evaluating Internet Research Sources.

13  Anonymity  Lack of Quality Control  Negative Metainformation. If all the reviews are critical, be careful.  Bad grammar or misspelled words Harris, R. (2007). Evaluating Internet Research Sources.

14  Up to date (within last 5 years)  Factual  Detailed, exact, comprehensive  Audience and purpose reflect intentions of completeness and accuracy  Goal: a source that is correct today (not yesterday), a source that gives the whole truth. Harris, R. (2007). Evaluating Internet Research Sources.

15  No date on the document  Vague or sweeping generalizations  Old date on information known to change rapidly  Very one-sided view that does not acknowledge opposing views or respond to them Harris, R. (2007). Evaluating Internet Research Sources.

16  Fair, balanced, objective  Reasoned, logical  No conflict of interest  Absence of fallacies or slanted tone  Goal: a source that engages the subject thoughtfully and reasonably, concerned with the truth. Harris, R. (2007). Evaluating Internet Research Sources.

17  Intemperate tone or language (“stupid jerks”)  Overclaims (“Thousands of children are murdered every day in the United States.”)  Sweeping statements of excessive significance (“This is the most important idea ever conceived!”)  Conflict of Interest (“Welcome to the Old Stogie Tobacco Company Home Page. To read our report, 'Cigarettes Make You Live Longer,' click here.”) Harris, R. (2007). Evaluating Internet Research Sources.

18  Listed sources  Contact information  Available corroboration  Claims supported  Documentation supplied  Goal: a source that provides convincing evidence for the claims made, a source you can triangulate (find at least two other sources that support it). Harris, R. (2007). Evaluating Internet Research Sources.

19  Numbers or statistics presented without an identified source for them  Absence of source documentation when the discussion clearly needs such documentation  You cannot find any other sources that present the same information or acknowledge that the same information exists (lack of corroboration) Harris, R. (2007). Evaluating Internet Research Sources.

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21 ERIC provides unlimited access to more than 1.2 million bibliographic records of journal articles and other education-related materials, with hundreds of new records added twice weekly. If available, links to full text are included. Education Resources Information Center Sponsored by the Institute of Education Sciences (IES) of USDE USDE. (2009). Education Resources Information Center (ERIC). Within the ERIC Collection, you will find records for: journal articles books research syntheses conference papers technical reports policy papers other education-related materials

22  Relevance to education  Quality guidelines: Completeness, Integrity, Objectivity, Substantive Merit, Utility/Importance  Sponsorship by professional societies and organizations (national or international), and state or federal government agencies  Editorial / Peer-review Processes: Adherence to ethical guidelines, Fidelity to editorial conventions, Methods of selection, Procedure for retractions, Opportunity for comments/opinions, Publication history, Reprint availability, Scholarly review board, Selectivity USDE. (2009). Education Resources Information Center (ERIC).

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24  Complete the Lesson 2 assessment  You’ll apply the CARS evaluation method using the CARS table CARS table  You only need to do 3 sources  completed assessment to instructor  There is no deadline, but do it soon so you can get timely feedback

25  Prepare a one-page handout for local school system program coordinators that lists resources, save as a document with links, and post to Kazoo - \\Kazoo\dosss\General_Division Information\Logic Models\Lesson 2 - Resources. \\Kazoo\dosss\General_Division Information\Logic Models\Lesson 2 - Resources  Reflect in your journal about the resources you’ve found and share your reflections in the discussion on Kazoo - \\Kazoo\dosss\General_Division Information\Logic Models\Reflections.\\Kazoo\dosss\General_Division Information\Logic Models\Reflections

26  Lesson 3: Discerning Key Information on Inputs from Program Design  Thurs. 7/2/09  1:00 – 2:00 p.m.  Room 839 – Computer Training Room


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