Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Page 11 Blank Grade 4 Oregon State Released Practice Tests Booklet # 4-8 Specified State Standards Listed Under: Demonstrate a General Understanding (Includes.

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "Page 11 Blank Grade 4 Oregon State Released Practice Tests Booklet # 4-8 Specified State Standards Listed Under: Demonstrate a General Understanding (Includes."— Presentation transcript:

1 Page 11 Blank Grade 4 Oregon State Released Practice Tests Booklet # 4-8 Specified State Standards Listed Under: Demonstrate a General Understanding (Includes Informational and Literary Text) The Test Samples in this Booklet were taken from the Oregon State Department of Education WEB Site, unless otherwise noted. Most questions for Grade 4 OAKS, Demonstrate a General Understanding, asks students to answer questions that are found directly in the text and follow a patterns of questions: Main Idea, Summarizing, Noting Details, Opinions and Problem Solving.

2 Page 1 Page 10 Teacher Information page: Grade 4 Oregon State Released Practice Tests Demonstrate a General Understanding (Includes Informational and Literary Text) Other state practice tests may be included as credited. Any other state practice released test included aligns with Oregon’s OAKS format and standards. O.D.E. Standards in this booklet include: (Note: These specific standards are assessed under the English/Language Arts Standards heading: Demonstrate a General Understanding or D.G.U. on OAKS.) These are HSD Power Standards: Literary Text: Demonstrate General Understanding EL.04.LI.04 Identify the main problem or conflict of the plot, and explain how it is resolved. EL.04.LI.03 Identify and/or summarize sequence of events, main ideas, and supporting details in literary selections. EL.04.RE.20 Informational Text: Identify and/or summarize sequence of events, main ideas, facts, supporting details, and opinions in informational and practical selections. Note: Although the above boxed standards are NOT Power Standards they are strongly assessed on OAKS for Informational and Literal Text.

3 Page 9 Page 2 AMANDA CLEMENT: THE UMPIRE IN A SKIRT In a day and age when opportunities for women in sports were limited, Marilyn Kratz tells about a young woman who bravely challenged this practice and earned respect for her efforts and ability. IT WAS A HOT SUNDAY AFTERNOON in Hawarden, a small town in western Iowa. Amanda Clement was sixteen years old. She sat quietly in the grandstand with her mother but she imagined herself right out there on the baseball diamond with the players. Back home in Hudson, South Dakota, her brother Hank and his friends often asked her to umpire games. Sometimes, she was even allowed to play first base. Today, Mandy, as she was called, could only sit and watch Hank pitch for Renville against Hawarden. The year was 1904, and girls were not supposed to participate in sports. But when the umpire for the preliminary game between two local teams didn’t arrive, Hank asked Mandy to make the calls. Mrs. Clement didn’t want her daughter to umpire a public event, but at last Hank and Mandy persuaded her to give her consent. Mandy eagerly took her position behind the pitcher’s mound. Because only one umpire was used in those days, she had to call plays on the four bases as well as strikes and balls. Mandy was five feet ten inches tall and looked very impressive as she accurately called the plays. She did so well that the players for the big game asked her to umpire for them—with pay! Oregon Dept. of Education… Office of Assessment and Information Services Sample Test, Grade 4

4 Page 8Page 3 Mrs. Clement was shocked at that idea. But Mandy finally persuaded her mother to allow her to do it. Amanda Clement became the first paid woman baseball umpire on record. Mandy’s fame spread quickly. Before long, she was umpiring games in North and South Dakota, Iowa, Minnesota, and Nebraska. Flyers, sent out to announce upcoming games, called Mandy the “World Champion Woman Umpire.” Her uniform was a long blue skirt, a black necktie, and a white blouse with UMPS stenciled across the front. Mandy kept her long dark hair tucked inside a peaked cap. She commanded respect and attention—players never said, “Kill the umpire!” They argued more politely, asking, “Beg your pardon, Miss Umpire, but wasn’t that one a bit high?” Mandy is recognized in the Baseball Hall of Fame in Cooperstown, New York; the Women’s Sports Hall of Fame; and the Woman’s Sports Foundation in San Francisco, California. In 1912, she held the world record for a woman throwing a baseball: 279 feet. Mandy’s earnings for her work as an umpire came in especially handy. She put herself through college and became a teacher and coach, organizing teams and encouraging athletes wherever she lived. Mandy died in People who knew her remember her for her work as an umpire, teacher, and coach, and because she loved helping people as much as she loved sports. AMANDA CLEMENT: THE UMPIRE IN A SKIRT 1.Which of the following was true in 1904? A.Women were allowed only to umpire in baseball games. B.Women were allowed only to pitch in baseball games. C.Women were not supposed to sit in the grandstand. D.Women were not supposed to participate in sports 2.How did Amanda Clement change the game of baseball? A.She was the first paid umpire. B.She was the first woman umpire. C.She was the first to wear a peaked cap and black necktie. D.She was the first to be an umpire, a coach, and a teacher. THE WIND By Robert Louis Stevenson I saw you toss the kites on high And blow the birds about the sky; And all around I hear you pass, Like ladies’ skirts across the grass – O Wind, a-blowing all day long, O wind, that sings so loud a song! I saw the different things you did, But always you yourself you hid. I felt you push, I heard you call, I could not see yourself at all – O wind, that sings so loud a song! O you that are so strong and cold, O blower, are you young or old? Are you a beast of field and tree, Or just a stronger child than me? O wind, a-blowing all day long, O wind, that sings so loud a song! THE WIND By Robert Louis Stevenson 9.In the poem the writers says the wind sounds like A.children laughing. B.birds in the sky. C.ladies skirts across the grass. D.kites on high. 10.What is the main idea of this poem? A.The wind is not young or old. B.The wind can toss kites. C.The wind blows all day long. D.The wind makes itself known in many ways. Permissible Reprint from ABC Teacher 2005

5 Page 4 Page 7 "The Fox and the Goat" - A Fable by Aesop One fine, hot day, Fox fell into an old abandoned well. The water was chin-high and muddy, and the well's walls were green with moss, much too slippery to climb. Fox being Fox, he did not bother to worry about his fate or blame himself for being clumsy. Instead he began immediately to scheme about how to get out of this predicament. Before long, when Fox heard the clop-clop of Goat passing by, he began to sing-tra-la-la!-and to splash water about. Soon a gray nose appeared at the well's rim. "What are you doing down there?" called Goat. "Just cooling off," the brazen Fox said. "This water is so perfectly delicious that I may just stay here enjoying myself all afternoon. But I'm a generous fellow, you know, and I am willing to share the fun. Would you like to join me?" "Gee, thanks!" said Goat. Without a second's hesitation, he jumped into the water. However, when he stood on the bottom of the well, he regretted his hasty leap. "Fox," he accused, "you told me it was pleasant down here!" "You must have misunderstood me," said Fox. "But don't worry; I know how to get us out of this place, if you like." He smiled a foxy smile. "Just stand with your front hooves against the wall while I get up on your shoulders and climb out, and then I'll lower a rope so you can escape as well." "They say we goats should watch out for foxes," said Goat, "but I can't imagine why. You're so clever!" And he did just as Fox asked him. Fox clambered up onto Goat's shoulders and out of the well. As he stood once again in the sunshine, he thought about lowering the well's rope, but it seemed an unnecessary bother. Besides, he decided, that silly goat needed to learn a lesson. So Fox shook the water off, fluffed up his fur, and off he went on his merry way. Permissible Reprint from ABC Teacher 2005 Herman was not only thankful but ashamed for having been so mean. “Little honey bee you may be small and thin but you are fast. You were fast enough to buzz around the human without getting caught. How can I thank you?” said Herman. Al thought quietly to himself. He thought about how being skinny may not be all that bad. “Well,” said Al “You just did!” AL’S WISH 6.Where do bumble bees live? A.In flowers B.In hives C.With small animals D.in ground nests 7.What parts of this passage could not happen? A.Bees living in hives. B.Bees drinking nectar. C.Bees being black and yellow. D.Bees talking. 8.Al decided that Herman had thanked him enough when A.Herman was saved. B.he realized that being skinny was OK. C.he liked living in a hive. D.he flew around the human.

6 Page 6Page 5 "The Fox and the Goat" - A Fable by Aesop 3.Why did the fox tell the goat, “This water is so perfectly delicious that I may just stay here enjoying myself all afternoon.” ? A.The fox wanted to share the cool water with the goat. B.The fox was lonely. C.The fox wanted to eat the goat. D.The fox was trying to trick the goat. 4.What lesson did the goat need to learn? A.Think before you act. B.Never trust a fox. C.Wells are not safe places. D.Don’t go walking alone. Permissible Reprint from ABC Teacher 2005 AL’S WISH “Get out of my way skinny,” yellow Herman the bumble bee. Al hated to be called skinny. He was angry at Herman not just for yelling at him but for being what Al wished to be. A bumble bee! He dreamed of having a large chubby bumble-bee body but he was only a small, thin honey bee. He watched the fuzzy bumble bees flit about, showing off their black and yellow stripes that seemed to shine in the bright sunlight. It wasn’t easy being a honey bee. Al did love to drink the nectar from the flowers that grew near his bee hive, but often Herman would follow him and push him aside. Sometimes Herman would follow him all day long just to show off his long tubed, bumble-bee, straw-like tongue. Herman could drink nectar many times faster than he could! Herman would then yell, “Go home to your hive little honey bee. This flower is all mine!” After drinking the nectar Herman would then dart off to his own ground nest amongst the tall, thick grass. Then one day Al was drinking nectar from a beautiful yellow daisy when suddenly he heard a loud rustle of wing flutter behind him. Al looked and saw Herman stuck under the foot of a human. The human man who tended the flowers. “Help Me,” shouted Herman. Al dashed quickly around the human’s head until the man stumbled backward, releasing Herman from beneath his foot. © Rick and Susan Richmond 2011


Download ppt "Page 11 Blank Grade 4 Oregon State Released Practice Tests Booklet # 4-8 Specified State Standards Listed Under: Demonstrate a General Understanding (Includes."

Similar presentations


Ads by Google