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DR CR Karisiddappa, Director, Academic Staff College, Dharwad Surinder Kumar, Technical Director, National Informatics Centre, New Delhi

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Presentation on theme: "DR CR Karisiddappa, Director, Academic Staff College, Dharwad Surinder Kumar, Technical Director, National Informatics Centre, New Delhi"— Presentation transcript:

1 DR CR Karisiddappa, Director, Academic Staff College, Dharwad Surinder Kumar, Technical Director, National Informatics Centre, New Delhi

2 Scientific Communication Channel - Conventional Journals Over 20,000 peer-review journals Number of papers published increases by 3.5% per year Journal prices have increased significantly more quickly than inflation over last 20 years. Even the wealthiest institution cannot purchase access to all the information that all of its researchers require Many publishers charge extra for online access – so causing more pressure on budgets

3 Scientific Communication Channel - Stake Holders Authors Their work is not seen by all their peers they do not get the recognition they desire Despite the fact they often have to pay page charges, colour figure charges, reprint charges, etc. Often the rights they have given up in exchange for publication mean there are things that they cannot do with their own work

4 Scientific Communication Channel - Stake Holders Researchers – They cannot view all the research literature they need – they are less effective Libraries – Cannot satisfy the information needs of their users Society – We all lose out if the communication channels are not optimal.

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6 Open Access – What It is What Open Access is – The Open Access research literature is composed of free, online copies of peer-reviewed journal articles and conference papers as well as technical reports, theses and working papers. In most cases there are no licensing restrictions on their use by readers. They can therefore be used freely for research, teaching and other purposes. What Open Access is not – It is not self-publishing, nor a way to bypass peer-review and publication, nor is it a kind of second-class, cut-price publishing route. It is simply a means to make research results freely available online to the whole research community.

7 The B’s of Open Access Budapest Open Access Initiative (February 2002) Bethesda Declaration (June 2003) Berlin Declaration (October 2003)

8 Definition of Open Access- Budapest Initiative There are many degrees and kinds of wider and easier access to this literature. By ‘open access’, we mean it’s free availability….. The only constraint …authors’control over the integrity of their work and the right to be properly acknowledged.

9 The Berlin Declaration …let users “copy, use, distribute, transmit and display the work publicly and to make and distribute derivative works, in any digital medium for any responsible purpose, subject to proper attribution of authorship…”

10 The Berlin Declaration …let users “copy, use, distribute, transmit and display the work publicly and to make and distribute derivative works, in any digital medium for any responsible purpose, subject to proper attribution of authorship…” berlin/berlindeclaration.hmtl

11 Directory of Open Access Journal - Definition We define open access journals as journals that use a funding model that does not charge readers or their institutions for access. From the BOAI definition [1] of "open access" we take the right of users to "read, download, copy, distribute, print, search, or link to the full texts of these articles" as mandatory for a journal to be included in the directory.

12 The Two Colors of Open Access Budapest Initiatives Gold –Open Access journals Green –Author Self-Archiving

13 Institutional Repositories-what it is An institutional repository or e-print archive is a digital repository of the research output of an institution that is usually accessible freely to end-users both within and outside of the institution IR is described as “a set of services that a university offers to the members of its community for the management and dissemination of digital materials created by the institution and its community members.” Clifford Lynch (2003), Executive Director of the Coalition for Networked Information

14 Institutional Repositories-benefits “Some proponents of the open access movement see the IR or open access archive as the most cost effective and immediate route to providing access to the results of publicly funded research, thereby maximizing the potential research impact of these publications” “Some research libraries see IRs as a means to expand on the amount and diversity of scholarly material that is collected and preserved, thus enhancing teaching, learning and research at the host institution and beyond.” “Some see IRs as a way to enhance an institution’s prestige or branding by showcasing its faculty’s research output.” “IRs is considered as an essential infrastructure for the reform of the entire enterprise of scholarly communication and publishing.” “Remedying the weakness of current local self archiving; running personal or departmental web servers is wasteful of academics’ time and academics frequently lack essential” Widely disseminating academic products and ideas of faculty, and enhancing paper’s cited rate Creating ease of access for peer group, and enhancing possibility of easy searching by adopting OAI-compatible standards Demonstrating to funding bodies the breadth and depth of research output from a university or institute to stake or further a leadership claim in a specific subject areas

15 IR-Setting Up Are you currently interested in an institutional repository for your institution? Why / why not? Who are the stakeholders involved at your institution? Have you started conversations with them re: an IR yet? Why / why not? What are your local considerations for content for an IR? Do you have any types of content specifically targeted yet? Describe your local IT situation: Describe Library technical staff: number, skills, range of activities Interactions with institution / campus IT staff (central IT units) What are your current thoughts on implementation of an IR for your institution? Who would be involved? What kind / level of involvement?

16 Type of Services Digitization Metadata Enhancement Batch Import Facility Proxy Services User Support & Training

17 Enabling Technology Open Source Technology Software Available Enabling OAI-PMH Standard Dspace (http://www.dspace.org)http://www.dspace.org Eprints(http://eprints.org)http://eprints.org GreenStone (http://www.greenstone.org)http://www.greenstone.org Commercial Software (ContentDm, DIGItools

18 IRS-Challenges Technical, Social Prolems such as Selection of Hardware, Selection of Software, Operation Problems such as Loading Software, Customization, setup server, security etc Moblizing Content, Feeling of Unnecssary extra burden, additional learning of technology

19 Conclusion Open Access to Research, thus maximizing the impact of research By preserving the Institutional Resources It may overcome eventually affordability problems. It may help in bridiging knowledge gap exist. It is felt more coordination at the National level to help in understanding its total effect.

20 Thanks


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