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MULTIPLE INTELLIGENCES & EDUCATION TODAY BY SUE GILLEN EDU 530 NOVEMBER 14, 2013.

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Presentation on theme: "MULTIPLE INTELLIGENCES & EDUCATION TODAY BY SUE GILLEN EDU 530 NOVEMBER 14, 2013."— Presentation transcript:

1 MULTIPLE INTELLIGENCES & EDUCATION TODAY BY SUE GILLEN EDU 530 NOVEMBER 14, 2013

2 MULTIPLE INTELLIGENCES... Howard Gardner’s developing psychological research and study of learning since 1972 has transformed into valued educational theories and strategies commonly known as “Multiple Intelligences.” Howard Gardner, American Psychologist and Educator, was born on July 11, His parents escaped from Nurnberg, Germany in 1938 with their three-year old son, Eric. Just before Howard Gardner’s birth, his brother Eric died in a sledding accident. Both events were not discussed during Gardner’s childhood. These two events had profound impact on Gardner’s development. Only intellectual pursuits were encouraged by his parents. (Smith) Gardner ‘s Career Path - Piano teacher ( ); Elementary School Teacher (Newton, MA 1969); Research Associate ( ); Harvard Graduate School of Education Lecturer in Education ( ); Associate Professor of Neurology ( ); Research Affiliate ( ); Research Psychologist ( ); Consulting Psychologist at Boston Veterans Administration Medical Center ( ); Harvard Graduate School Professor of Education ( ); Project Zero Co- Director ( ) & Senior Director (2000-present); John H. and Elisabeth A. Hobbs Professor of Cognition and Education, Harvard Graduate School of Education 1998-present) (Plucker)

3 GARDNER’S THEORIESPUT INTO BOOKS 1983; 2003 Frames of Mind 1991 The Unschooled Mind: How Children Think and How Schools Should Teach 1993 Multiple Intelligences: The Theory in Practice 1999 Intelligence Reframed 1999 The Disciplined Mind: What All Students Should Understand 2000 The Disciplined Mind: Beyond Facts And Standardized Tests, The K-12 Education That Every Child Deserves 2011 Truth, Beauty, and Goodness Reframed 1967-present Project Zero, Currently a Principal Investigator His first publications ask this intelligence question...

4 HOW ARE YOUR STUDENTS SMART? IN WHAT WAYS...

5 STUDENT FRIENDLY LEARNING STYLES-TYPES OF INTELLIGENCES DIAGRAM

6 examples-characteristics.html (williams)

7 GARDNER’S 8 CATEGORIES OF INTELLIGENCES 1.Linguistic intelligence 2.Logical-mathematical intelligence 3.Spatial intelligence 4.Bodily-kinesthetic intelligence 5.Musical intelligences 6.Interpersonal intelligence 7.Intrapersonal intelligence 8.Naturalist intelligence 9.Existential intelligence-Gardner proposed this addition after initially publishing the first 8 categories of multiple intelligences.

8 LINGUISTIC INTELLIGENCE “the ability to think in words and to use language to express and appreciate complex meanings.” (campbell, p xx) Characterisitics: often speak about things that you read love to write find it easy to learn new languages enjoy English class and word games deep interest in working with words Writers Public Speakers Teachers Poets JournalistsBroadcaster JournalistsEditors

9 LOGICAL-MATHEMATICAL INTELLIGENCE “makes it possible to calculate, quantify, consider propositions and hypotheses, and carry out complex mathematical operations.” (campbell, p. xx) Characterisitcs: Easily do math in their head Good at strategy games Enjoy science experiments Organize things by category Abstract thinker Wonder how things work Look for a rationale explanation Scientists Computer Programmers Lawyers Bookkeepers Doctors Accountants Engineers Researchers Financial Planners

10 SPATIAL INTELLIGENCE “instills the capacity to think in three-dimensional ways as do sailors, pilots, sculptors, painters, and architects.” (campbell, p. xx) Characteristics: Interested in solving visual puzzles Can visualize images in their head Enjoyed geometry in school Clearly notice shapes and colors Like books containing pictures Can remember places clearly Graphic Designers Artists Engineers Interior Decorators Fashion Designer Photographers

11 Surgeons Crafters Athletes Dancers Physical Therapists Mechanics Gardeners Performers P.E. Teachers Characteristics: Learns by doing Enjoys the outdoors Well-coordinated with good motor skills Likes to work with hands Has high physical energy Can’t sit still too long BODILY-KINESTHETIC INTELLIGENCE “…one to manipulate objects and fine-tune physical skills.” (campbell, pg xxi)

12 Characteristics: Easily memorize songs Often singing, whistling or tapping a song Responds readily to music Often has a song running through their head Careers: performers, singers, conductors, composers/songwriter, music teacher, choir/band director, record producer MUSICAL INTELLIGENCE “…individuals who possess a sensitivity to pitch, melody, rhythm & tone.” (campbell, p. xxi)

13 INTERPERSONAL INTELLIGENCE “…capcity to understand and interact effectively with others.” (campbell, p. xxi) Characteristics: Strong leadership skills Good verbal and non-verbal communicators Cooperative, team players Show empathy in sensitive situations Develop positive relationships with others Show strong organizational skills Can view situations from many viewpoints CounselorsPolitician Sales Rep.Actors TeachersAdministrators

14 INTRAPERSONAL INTELLIGENCE “…to construct an accurate perception of oneself and to use such knowledge in planning and directing one’s life.” (campbell, p. xxi) Characteristics: Intuitive Independent Introverted Understands personal strengths/weaknesses Spends time thinking and reflecting Self-employment is appealing Philisophical Psychologists Philosophers WriterTheologian

15 Characteristics: Loves nature Enjoys pets Likes to hike, walk, & camp Notices weather changes Conservationists Meteorologists Botanists Veterinarians Geologists Animal Trainers Gardeners Ecologists Farmers Landscapers NATURALIST INTELLIGENCE

16 A HOWARD GARDNER PICTURE IMAGE WITHFRIENDSHIP.COM

17 INTELLIGENT ENVIRONMENTS Work Zone Storage Zone Display Zone Library Zone Soft Zone Movement Zone Creating positive environments to live and learn...

18 CLASSROOM APPLICATIONS OF THE THEORY OF MULTIPLE INTELLIGENCES CURRICULUM & ASSESSMENT

19 CURRICULUM When an educational topic interests students, the chance for more effective instruction is increased exponentially! Multiple Intelligences instructional processes for curriculum creation and implementation are meant to improve student learning in any discipline. There are a multitude of multiple intelligence teaching strategies. Using 3 or 4 modes as pathways to content is recommended. Students will get information in many ways. Helpful instructional menus have been designed to create lessons. (Campbell, p ) Teaching interdisciplinary units can engage Multiple Intelligences and create meaningful learning connections. Team teaching is one way to make implementing Multiple Intelligences lessons more manageable. Learning Centers based on Multiple Intelligences are effective teaching tools. Project-based curriculum require student led learning. This creates more engaged, active learners. Avoid curriculum biases by using Gardner’s theory to address all learner’s needs.

20 BENEFITS & CHALLENGES OF INTERDISCIPLINARY EDUCATION USING MULTIPLE INTELLIGENCES We’ve heard these type of comments … Who disagrees with these thoughts? …So why is it difficult to implement interdisciplinary education? “We should use the arts in the general classroom.” “A collaborative learner is a complex thinker.” “It is so efficient to integrate the arts into the core curriculum.” “We need to teach the whole child.” “Music teachers are good collaborators & special educators. It’s a natural fit.”

21 TAKE SMALL STEPS +Good teaching is about giving students as many tools as possible to have successful learning outcomes. +Use as lesson enrichment opportunities. +Use costumes/props /chants/ songs for students to create a photo Powerpoint or video relating to a lesson/thematic unit. +Try modified flipped classroom strategies to increase interdisciplinary learning opportunities. Put related videos, sites, surveys on your web page. Encourage students to investigate the resources outside of your class. Share their reflection on the resources (maybe earn class stars/reward).

22 ASSESSMENT  Assessing learning should allow students to show what they know and enrich their learning.  Traditional assessments may not provide a true reflection of student learning.  Summative evaluations are important, but don’t improve learning. Ex.-end of unit with emphasis on grade & accountability  Gardner recommended active performance assessing throughout a unit, thus, increasing student motivation and achievement. (Campbell, p. 287)  Good assessment of learner outcomes: captures growth over time; is multidimensional; informs instruction; can be informal; can be student self-assessed; and takes into account each student’s area of Multiple Intelligences.

23 (CAMPBELL, P. 300) Assessment Through The Intelligences Math: Analytic Scoring Guide Spatial: Pictorials Interpersonal: Peer Review Nature: Observational Checklist Intrapersonal: Reflective Journal Bodily: Exhibitions Music: Songwriting Linguistic: Culminating Essay

24 KNOWLEDGE GAINED THROUGH MULTIPLE INTELLIGENCE SCHOOL PROGRAMS  Educators adapted Howard Gardner’s theories because they fit with the proof found in teacher’s daily experiences. That proof is every child learns in a different way. (Smith)  Gardner’s research and theories helped educators more effectively teach in ways more conducive to all their students. (Smith)  A teacher’s belief in students multi-talent and students success raise student expectation and achievement. (Campbell, p. 324)  Multiple intelligences expands the classroom teacher’s instructional repertoire.( Campbell, p. 325)  Curricular changes have been made in classroom instruction, interdisciplinary, thematic, project-based and center styles of learning.  Assessment changes are made as student work is integrated with instruction, as students self & peer assess, and the products and processes of learning are both valued.  Gardner’s intelligences challenged teachers to begin teaching content in new ways, in creating new instructional strategies and in assessing students.  Student learning is guided strongly by each individual student’s interest and talent.

25 MULTIPLE INTELLIGENCE TEACHER TOOLS

26 PROMPTS FOR VARIOUS THINKING STYLES:

27

28

29 A DIAGRAM TO HELP STUDENTS FIND THEIR LEARNING STYLE

30 ANOTHER WAY FOR STUDENTS TO FIND THEIR LEARNING STYLE

31 ELEMENTARY STUDENTS DIAGRAM FOR FINDING LEARNING STYLES

32 Common Core learning provides a consistent, clear understanding of learner outcomes created to reflect information and skills students need to succeed in college & careers. Each chart area is designed to work together educating our children. MULTIPLE INTELLIGENCE & EDUCATION’S FUTURE

33 MULTIPLE INTELLIGENCES & 40 YEARS INFLUENCING EDUCATION HAS SPAWNED MORE RESEARCH/THEORIES IN: LEARNING STYLES, THINKING STYLES, COOPERATIVE LEARNING, BRAIN BASED EDUCATION….ALL THESE OLD AND “NEW AND IMPROVED” THEORIES AND STRATEGIES HELP PREPARE STUDENTS FOR THE 21 ST CENTURY!

34 REFERENCES Campbell, L., Campbell, Bl, & Dickinson, D. (2004). Teaching and Learning Through Multiple Intelligences (third ed.). Boston, MA: Pearson Allyn and Bacon. Framework for 21st Century Learning. (n.d.). In Partnership for 21st Century Skills. Retrieved September 23, 2013, from Implementing the Common Core State Standards. (n.d.). In Common Core State Standards Initiative. Retrieved September 23, 2013, from Kelly, M. (n.d.). Profile in Existential Intelligence. In About.com.secondary education. Retrieved September 22, 2013, from Kendra, C. (n.d.). Howard Gardner Biography. In Psychology.About.com. Retrieved September 22, 2013, from Plucker, J. A. (Ed.). (2013). Human intelligence: Historical influences, current controversies, teaching resources. Howard Gardner. Retrieved September 22, 2013, from Powers, K. (2013, October). Crossover Classes: Missing the Message. Teaching Music, 21(2), Project Zero. (n.d.). In Harvard Graduate School of Education Project Zero. Retrieved September 22, 2013, from Seven Things You Should Know About.the Flipped Classroom. (2012, February). In Educause Learning Initiative. Retrieved October 14, 2013, from Smith, Mark K. (2002, 2008) ‘Howard Gardner and multiple intelligences’, the encyclopedia of informal education,http://www.infed.org/mobi/howard-gardner-multiple-intelligences-and-education.http://www.infed.org/mobi/howard-gardner-multiple-intelligences-and-education Sternberg, R. J., & Zhang, L. (2005, June). Styles of Thinking as a Basis of Differentiated Instruction [Electronic version].Theory into Practice, 44(3), Williams, Y. (n.d.). Interpersonal Intelligence. In Education Portal. Retrieved September 22, 2013, from portal.com/academy/lesson/interpersonal-intelligence-definition-examples-characteristics.htmlhttp://education- portal.com/academy/lesson/interpersonal-intelligence-definition-examples-characteristics.html Wilson, L. (n.d.). Overview of Brain Based Education. In ED Brain Based Education. Retrieved November 2, 2013, from


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