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Dine and Discover Coaching your Students to be Lifelong Learners and Critical Thinkers: The Intellectual Traits April 13, 2010 Nisha Gupta, Ph.D. Patty.

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Presentation on theme: "Dine and Discover Coaching your Students to be Lifelong Learners and Critical Thinkers: The Intellectual Traits April 13, 2010 Nisha Gupta, Ph.D. Patty."— Presentation transcript:

1 Dine and Discover Coaching your Students to be Lifelong Learners and Critical Thinkers: The Intellectual Traits April 13, 2010 Nisha Gupta, Ph.D. Patty Payette, Ph.D. 1

2 Review of the Goals Examine closely and work with the nine eight Intellectual Traits as defined in the Paul-Elder critical thinking framework. Explore, and reflect upon, how you can explicitly promote these “habits of mind” in your students and review examples of this work from your peers. Develop and discuss new learning outcomes and activities that might support the development of Intellectual Traits. 2

3 Before we begin….. complete a Focused Listing List in words and phrases the kind of thinker you want to students to become after completing your course or program? What kinds of critical thinking habits or dispositions should they begun to internalize and master?

4 Ideas to Action (i2a) and “Connecting the Dots ” “Our extensive consultation with all University constituencies yielded a surprisingly strong and clear call for education focused on the skills and knowledge needed to deal with real-world issues and problems, an education in which students can see the importance of the parts (the courses) to the whole (their education as citizens and workers).” [QEP Proposal, 2007] skills and knowledge real-world issues & problems the parts to the whole

5 Share your words/phrases that you associate with the thinkers you want your students to become.

6 Focused Listing Classroom Assessment Technique (CAT) # Focuses learner on a single important term, concept, name, idea from the course and asks them to list/respond Helps learners recall the most important points Assess what a learner has retained or assumptions/preconce ptions and misconceptions Small groups, class discussion, exam review Low stakes assessment

7 The Paul-Elder Framework 7 Intellectual Standards Intellectual Traits Humility Autonomy Fair-mindedness Courage Perseverance Empathy Integrity Confidence AccuracyClarityRelevanceLogicSufficiency PrecisionDepthSignificanceFairnessBreadth To Develop Must be Applied To Intellectual Traits Intellectual Humility Intellectual Autonomy Intellectual Fair-mindedness Intellectual Courage Intellectual Perseverance Intellectual Empathy Intellectual Integrity Confidence in Reasoning

8 Intellectual Traits Traits of mind or cognitive habits Skilled thinking that does not manipulate others or distort reality “Checks and balances” for our own thinking and the thinking of others Intellectual traits guide us to be fair-minded

9 Intellectual Hypocrisy Intellectual Arrogance Intellectual Laziness Intellectual Disregard for Justice Distrust for Reason Intellectual Cowardice Intellectual Self- Centeredness Intellectual Conformity Traits of the Undisciplined Mind Adapted from Critical Thinking: Learn the Tools the Best Teachers Use by Richard Paul and Linda Elder (p. 190)

10 Traits of the Disciplined Mind Intellectual Integrity Intellectual Humility Intellectual Perseverance Intellectual Fair- mindedness Confidence in Reasoning Intellectual Courage Intellectual Empathy Intellectual Autonomy Adapted from Critical Thinking: Learn the Tools the Best Teachers Use by Richard Paul and Linda Elder (p. 190)

11 Intellectual Traits: Fundamental and Powerful Concept For many students, these concepts and behaviors may be new to them. They need support with naming, exploring and developing these skills. p. 20: stages of critical thinking development

12 “Genuine intellectual development requires people to develop intellectual traits…Skills, values, insights, and intellectual traits are mutually and dynamically interrelated. It is the whole person who thinks, not some fragment of the person.” -Richard Paul Critical thinking: how to prepare students for a rapidly changing world (1995)

13 Going deeper: Intellectual Traits Work in groups of 2 Each take 4 Traits: Quietly read and review your handout on the Traits and Miniature Guide (p.14-15) and begin to grasp what that Trait is all about. Briefly summarize in your own words what it is. Close book, discuss with each other your understanding of your respective Traits. Then together discuss and fill in: Why is it significant for students to learn or cultivate this trait? What is the opposite of this trait? What does it look like when we see this “opposite”? Integrity and Humility Autonomy and Confidence in Reasoning Empathy and Fairmindedness Courage and Perseverance

14 Traits Inventory Fill out with your Pov as an instructor Mark your top 3 strengths How did you cultivate this strength as a thinker? Who and what situations or experiences helped you develop these skills and how? Through which processes or methods did this person develop his or her thinking? Through which processes or methods did this person develop his or her thinking? What are some critical thinking constructs used or developed by this person? What are some critical thinking constructs used or developed by this person? What does the above teach us about critical thinking? What does the above teach us about critical thinking? Conversely, how does critical thinking help illuminate the work and thinking of these great minds? Conversely, how does critical thinking help illuminate the work and thinking of these great minds? Finally, what implications does any of this have for instruction? Finally, what implications does any of this have for instruction?

15 Traits Inventory Fill out this inventory with the point of view of yourself as an instructor. Low Risk Assessment!

16 Coaching for these Traits Setting expectations explicitly for you and your students: intentional choose which Trait your assignments and course will cultivate. Consider revising your course outcomes to reflect the Traits Modeling and designing instruction to support that development of that trait Assessing for that trait: giving feedback verbally or a rubric or integrating Traits into the evaluation or grading process

17 Burnet (pt. 1), Anthropology The main vehicle for fostering these traits in the work of my students will be the semester long research paper. This assignment is broken down into numerous, small steps that students will be required to complete throughout the semester. This method will foster __Autonomy_________ by leading students through the numerous steps of critical thinking that go into producing a high-quality research paper so that they know how to do it on their own in the future. A.Intellectual Courage B.Intellectual Autonomy C.Confidence in Reason

18 Collins, Social Work My job is to teach them how to bring about changes in individuals, groups, and communities. Many of these changes are systemic and may exceed individual choices or responsibilities. I will challenge students to examine their own reasoning about the rightness and wrongness of choices people make. This will foster the intellectual trait of ___empathy_________. A.Intellectual Integrity B.Intellectual Empathy C.Confidence in Reason D.Intellectual Autonomy

19 Elhaj, Business If the problem is not a replica, then remember that it will not be solved in exactly the same way we did our illustration. The solution is not going to be straightforward in the sense of imitation. But do not give up too quickly. This will require patience and _____________. A.Confidence in Reason B.Intellectual Perseverance C.Intellectual Humility D.Intellectual Courage

20 Faculty member, A&S [This] can be cultivated in group discussions by encouraging honest, open discussions and by requiring students to support their opinions/positions with data and to respect the supported positions of others. This statement is related to a course assignment and reflects the instructor’s desire to cultivate which two intellectual traits? A.Confidence in Reason and Intellectual Humility B.Fairmindedness and Intellectual Perserverance C.Intellectual Humility and Intellectual Autonomy D.Intellectual Courage and Confidence in Reason

21 Hayden, Justice Administration I want the students to become consumers of research in the criminal justice field. My first goal is for students to achieve _________________ as they learn to read and comprehend research studies. This trait is important to this course because of the very nature of the field and topic. Criminal justice students need to develop the ability to challenge the status quo and be critical of the criminal justice system. A. Fairmindedness B. Intellectual Humility C. Intellectual Courage

22 Mansfield-Jones, Anatomy & Physiology Some barriers to understanding in anatomy and physiology are pre-existing misunderstandings or erroneous beliefs. At their most obvious, these might be things like believing a "backbone" is a single bone, or believing a media-driven impression that cholesterol is a toxin. A related problem is and substitution of a broad generalization (balance, equilibrium) for deep understanding. These have to be at least tentatively set aside to consider alternatives. The instructor has identified an intellectual trait that she wishes to foster in students in order to help them overcome the barriers to developing the disciplinary thinking that she has described above. Which trait is it? A. Confidence in Reason B. Fairmindedness C. Intellectual Humility D. Intellectual Courage

23 Yohannes, English I hope to cultivate ____________ by pushing students to work with longer texts and with the more involved research project. A. Intellectual Integrity B. Intellectual Perseverance C. Intellectual Humility D. Intellectual Courage

24 1.Study, analyze, and evaluate social problems across multiple systemic levels with individuals, families, groups, or community members. (INTEGRITY) 2.Practice active listening without reference to one’s own feelings. (EMPATHY) 3.Encourage people to come to their own conclusions. (AUTONOMY) 4.Identify solutions to problems through collaboration and input from the client. (HUMILITY) 5.Exhibit fairness and respect to clients regardless of age, class, color, culture, disability, ethnicity, family structure, gender, marital status, national origin, race, religion, sex, and sexual orientation. (FAIRMINDEDNESS) 6.Recognize the need to use supervision and consultation to increase social work skills. (HUMILITY) Red = elements Blue = standards Green = traits 24 SW 604: Wanda Collins Skill-based course outcomes

25 Strategies for fostering Traits Setting expectations Be explicit with your expectations in writing and verbally for the thinking you desire from students Model, model, model this thinking for them (idea #27) (Brookfield and the hats) Label, label, label the thinking and “cognitive moves” they do and you do with them Remind them that thinking skills can be cultivated consciously with practice.

26 Coaching “Think of yourself as a coach” essay (Ideas 18) Choose a specific Trait to focus on (Idea #29)

27 Assessing -Classroom Assessment Techniques (low-risk) _Reflection papers Confidence surveys Traits Inventory

28 Coaching slide Through which processes or methods did this person develop his or her thinking? Through which processes or methods did this person develop his or her thinking? What are some critical thinking constructs used or developed by this person? What are some critical thinking constructs used or developed by this person? What does the above teach us about critical thinking? What does the above teach us about critical thinking? Conversely, how does critical thinking help illuminate the work and thinking of these great minds? Conversely, how does critical thinking help illuminate the work and thinking of these great minds? Finally, what implications does any of this have for instruction? Finally, what implications does any of this have for instruction?

29 Reflection/planning: how will you use the Traits to coach students to work toward a “master thinker”? 1. Setting expectations 2. Coaching/designing assignments to promote intellectual Traits 3.

30 Metacognitive Reflection Questions & List of Strategies: what will you do next?


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