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How are we doing? DO NOW One person at each table will be labelled with a post-it note. On the note will be written either a key term or the name of a.

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Presentation on theme: "How are we doing? DO NOW One person at each table will be labelled with a post-it note. On the note will be written either a key term or the name of a."— Presentation transcript:

1 How are we doing? DO NOW One person at each table will be labelled with a post-it note. On the note will be written either a key term or the name of a politician. Everyone else on the table must define the term or describe the politician without using the term/name itself or any part of the term/name, e.g. ‘Democracy’ could be ‘the principle that political authority derives from the consent of the governed’. Once you have correctly guessed the first term, take turns writing turns for one another.

2 Where we are in the course Unit 2: Governing Modern Britain Topic 1: The Constitution Topic 2: Parliament Topic 3: The Core Executive Topic 4: Multi-level Governance

3 How will we approach today’s assessment Everyone will complete one section from a real examination paper −In the real exam, you will complete two out of four sections The section we will look at is concerned with the Core Executive The assessment will be conducted under open book conditions −you will have access to your own notes, to dedicated resources and to specific mark schemes

4 The Core Executive Read the extract above and answer the following questions: Explain the term senior civil servants used in the extract. (5) Using your own knowledge as well as the extract, explain why it is not surprising that ‘the civil servants sometimes appear cautious’. (10) Evaluate the factors that can give the prime minister power over other cabinet members. (25) Civil servants and ministers The private office of a minister consists of a private secretary and up to three assistant secretaries. It acts as a link between the ministers and their departments and organises most of their working day – listening in on telephone calls, fixing appointments and briefing them. The office sifts the papers coming into the department and decides which papers and delegations the minister should see. A decision to refer a matter to a minister depends on its sensitivity, demands on resources, need for political judgement, and uncertainty about the minister’s reactions. An essential part of the policy- making role of senior civil servants is to know a minister’s mind. These civil servants spend perhaps a fifth of their time on work relating to Parliament: for example, preparing for parliamentary questions, drawing up legislation, drafting speeches and handling the correspondence with MPs. It is not surprising, therefore, that the civil servants sometimes appear cautious. Source: adapted from D. Kavanagh, British Politics: Continuities and Change (OUP: 2000)

5 25 mark questions L Explicit and sustained evaluation of the practical extent of prime ministerial power under a variety of circumstances, e.g. In some circumstances, prime ministers have been unable in practice to exercise power that was theoretically his/hers as a function of their office. L More detailed discussion about the nature of and limits to prime ministers’ powers over Cabinet members, e.g. reliance on Cabinet office and ‘special advisors’ can cause irritation and result in an erosion of trust. L More detailed discussion about sources of prime ministerial power with specific reference to Cabinet members, e.g. (s)he can convene partial Cabinets or govern through the use of a ‘kitchen Cabinet’ L1 1-6 Simple statements about prime ministerial power, e.g. (s)he has the ability to appoint and dismiss government ministers. 10 mark questions L The student demonstrates an excellent knowledge and understanding of political concepts, theories, institutions and processes to address fully the requirements of the question. L3 6-8 The student demonstrates a good knowledge and understanding of political concepts, theories, institutions and processes to address the requirements of the question. L The student demonstrates a limited knowledge and understanding of political concepts, theories, institutions and processes in order to make a limited attempt to address the requirements of the question. L1 1-3 The student demonstrates little knowledge and understanding of political concepts, theories, institutions and processes and makes little attempt to address the requirements of the question.

6 Civil servants and ministers The private office of a minister consists of a private secretary and up to three assistant secretaries. It acts as a link between the ministers and their departments and organises most of their working day – listening in on telephone calls, fixing appointments and briefing them. The office sifts the papers coming into the department and decides which papers and delegations the minister should see. A decision to refer a matter to a minister depends on its sensitivity, demands on resources, need for political judgement, and uncertainty about the minister’s reactions. An essential part of the policy-making role of senior civil servants is to know a minister’s mind. These civil servants spend perhaps a fifth of their time on work relating to Parliament: for example, preparing for parliamentary questions, drawing up legislation, drafting speeches and handling the correspondence with MPs. It is not surprising, therefore, that the civil servants sometimes appear cautious. Source: adapted from D. Kavanagh, British Politics: Continuities and Change (OUP: 2000)

7 5 mark questions Level 4 (5 marks) The student successfully demonstrates excellent knowledge and understanding of political data, concept(s) or term(s). Where appropriate, the student is able to illustrate his/her answer with relevant evidence/example(s). Level 3 (4 marks) The student successfully demonstrates good knowledge and understanding of political data, concept(s) or term(s). Where appropriate, the student is able to illustrate his/her answer with relevant evidence/example(s). Level 2 (2–3 marks) The student demonstrates limited knowledge and understanding of political data, concept(s) or term(s). The student may illustrate his/her answer with evidence/example(s) of limited relevance. Level 1 (1 mark) The student demonstrates little knowledge and understanding of political data, concept(s) or term(s). The student may illustrate his/her answer with evidence or examples of little relevance.

8 Explain the term senior civil servants used in the extract. (5) Read the handout on the role and functions of the civil service. Write a short working definition of a senior civil servant, citing examples.

9 Using your own knowledge as well as the extract, explain why it is not surprising that ‘the civil servants sometimes appear cautious’. (10) Read the handout on the role and functions of the civil service. Working independently, highlight evidence and/or quotes in the article that could help you answer the question above. Write an answer to the question above. Your answer should be about one page in length and is likely to include 2-3 reasons.

10 Evaluate the factors that can give the prime minister power over other cabinet members. (25) Re-read the article ‘Cameron: the first cut’ by Anthony Seldon. Working with a partner, highlight evidence and/or quotes in the article that could help you answer the ‘mini-essay’ question above. You may include any other material that you consider relevant, but you will not be marked down for relying on the contents of the article. Pay close attention to the importance of evaluation in the mark scheme. You are not only looking for things that make the PM powerful, but also for practical limits to his/her power.

11 STUDENT RESOURCES

12 Constitutional MonarchyLiberal DemocracyParliamentary Sovereignty A form of government in which the monarch retains considerable power, but also requires the support of parliament. A form of democracy based on regular elections and representative institutions. It lays great stress on individual freedom and a limited role for government. A state in which Parliament has the ultimate power to make, amend or repeal laws, including to create or abolish any local or devolved body. The ExecutiveThe rule of lawMandate

13 This branch of government consists of PM, Cabinet, ministers, civil service and partly local government. The principle that everyone, including the government, is accountable to the same legal standards. The approval and authority given by the electorate to the policies contained in the manifesto of the party elected to office. StateAuthorityThe Government The political association that exercises sovereign power over groups and individuals via permanent institutions within a defined territory. Power derived from the consent of the governed. The body of persons authorised to administer the law, to rule, and to control the state.

14 CoalitionManifestoLegislature


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