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Chapter 5 The Time Value of Money. Copyright ©2014 Pearson Education, Inc. All rights reserved.5-1 Learning Objectives 1.Explain the mechanics of compounding,

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Presentation on theme: "Chapter 5 The Time Value of Money. Copyright ©2014 Pearson Education, Inc. All rights reserved.5-1 Learning Objectives 1.Explain the mechanics of compounding,"— Presentation transcript:

1 Chapter 5 The Time Value of Money

2 Copyright ©2014 Pearson Education, Inc. All rights reserved.5-1 Learning Objectives 1.Explain the mechanics of compounding, and bringing the value of money back to the present. 2.Understand annuities. 3.Determine the future or present value of a sum when there are nonannual compounding periods. 4.Determine the present value of an uneven stream of payments and understand perpetuities.

3 Copyright ©2014 Pearson Education, Inc. All rights reserved.5-2 COMPOUND INTEREST, FUTURE, AND PRESENT VALUE

4 Copyright ©2014 Pearson Education, Inc. All rights reserved.5-3 Using Timelines to Visualize Cash Flows Timeline of cash flows Negative: Cash outflow; Positive: cash inflow So out 100 now, in 30 one year later; in 20 two year later; out 10 three year later; in 50 four year later.

5 Copyright ©2014 Pearson Education, Inc. All rights reserved.5-4 Compound Interest Compounding is when interest paid on an investment during the first period is added to the principal; then, during the second period, interest is earned on the new sum (that includes the principal and interest earned so far).

6 Copyright ©2014 Pearson Education, Inc. All rights reserved.5-5 Compound Interest Example: Compute compound interest on $100 invested at 6% for three years with annual compounding. 1 st year interest is $6.00 Principal now is $ nd year interest is $6.36 Principal now is $ rd year interest is $6.74 Principal now is $ Total interest earned: $19.10

7 Copyright ©2014 Pearson Education, Inc. All rights reserved.5-6 Future Value Future Value is the amount a sum will grow to in a certain number of years when compounded at a specific rate. FVN = PV (1 + r) n FVN = the future of the investment at the end of “n” years r = the annual interest (or discount) rate n = number of years PV= the present value, or original amount invested at the beginning of the first year

8 Copyright ©2014 Pearson Education, Inc. All rights reserved.5-7 Future Value Example Example: What will be the FV of $100 in 2 years at interest rate of 6%? FV 2 = PV(1 + r) 2 = $100 ( ) 2 = $100 (1.06) 2 = $112.36

9 Copyright ©2014 Pearson Education, Inc. All rights reserved.5-8 How to Increase the Future Value? Future Value can be increased by: –Increasing number of years of compounding (N) –Increasing the interest or discount rate (r) –Increasing the original investment (PV) See example on next slide

10 Copyright ©2014 Pearson Education, Inc. All rights reserved.5-9 Changing R, N, and PV a.You deposit $500 in bank for 2 years. What is the FV at 2%? What is the FV if you change interest rate to 6%? FV at 2% = 500*(1.02) 2 = $520.2 FV at 6% = 500*(1.06) 2 = $561.8 b.Continue the same example but change time to 10 years. What is the FV now? FV = 500*(1.06) 10 = $ c.Continue the same example but change contribution to $1500. What is the FV now? FV = 1,500*(1.06) 10 = $2,686.27

11 Copyright ©2014 Pearson Education, Inc. All rights reserved.5-10 Figure 5-1

12 Copyright ©2014 Pearson Education, Inc. All rights reserved.5-11 Figure 5-2

13 Copyright ©2014 Pearson Education, Inc. All rights reserved.5-12 Figure 5-2 Figure 5-2 illustrates that we can increase the FV by: –Increasing the number of years for which money is invested; and/or –Investing at a higher interest rate.

14 Copyright ©2014 Pearson Education, Inc. All rights reserved.5-13 Computing Future Values using Calculator or Excel Review discussion in the text book Excel Function for FV: = FV(rate,nper,pmt,pv)

15 Copyright ©2014 Pearson Education, Inc. All rights reserved.5-14 Present Value Present value reflects the current value of a future payment or receipt.

16 Copyright ©2014 Pearson Education, Inc. All rights reserved.5-15 Present Value PV = FVn {1/(1 + r) n } FVn = the future value of the investment at the end of n years n = number of years until payment is received r = the interest rate PV = the present value of the future sum of money

17 Copyright ©2014 Pearson Education, Inc. All rights reserved.5-16 PV example What will be the present value of $500 to be received 10 years from today if the discount rate is 6%? PV = $500 {1/(1+0.06) 10 } = $500 (1/1.791) = $500 (0.558) = $279

18 Copyright ©2014 Pearson Education, Inc. All rights reserved.5-17 Figure 5-3

19 Copyright ©2014 Pearson Education, Inc. All rights reserved.5-18 Figure 5-3 Figure 5-3 illustrates that PV is lower if: –Time period is longer; and/or –Interest rate is higher.

20 Copyright ©2014 Pearson Education, Inc. All rights reserved.5-19 Using Excel Excel Function for PV: = PV(rate,nper,pmt,fv)

21 Copyright ©2014 Pearson Education, Inc. All rights reserved.5-20 ANNUITIES

22 Copyright ©2014 Pearson Education, Inc. All rights reserved.5-21 Annuity An annuity is a series of equal dollar payments for a specified number of years. Ordinary annuity payments occur at the end of each period.

23 Copyright ©2014 Pearson Education, Inc. All rights reserved.5-22 FV of Annuity Compound Annuity Depositing or investing an equal sum of money at the end of each year for a certain number of years and allowing it to grow.

24 Copyright ©2014 Pearson Education, Inc. All rights reserved.5-23 FV Annuity - Example What will be the FV of a 5-year, $500 annuity compounded at 6%? FV 5 = $500 ( ) 4 + $500 ( ) 3 + $500( ) 2 + $500 ( ) + $500 = $500 (1.262) + $500 (1.191) + $500 (1.124) + $500 (1.090) + $500 = $ $ $ $ $500 = $2,818.50

25 Copyright ©2014 Pearson Education, Inc. All rights reserved.5-24 Table 5-1

26 Copyright ©2014 Pearson Education, Inc. All rights reserved.5-25 FV of an Annuity – Using the Mathematical Formulas FV n = PMT {(1 + r) n – 1/r} FV n = the future of an annuity at the end of the nth year PMT = the annuity payment deposited or received at the end of each year r = the annual interest (or discount) rate n = the number of years

27 Copyright ©2014 Pearson Education, Inc. All rights reserved.5-26 FV of an Annuity – Using the Mathematical Formulas What will $500 deposited in the bank every year for 5 years at 10% be worth? FV = PMT ([(1 + r) n – 1]/r) = $500 (5.637) = $2,818.50

28 Copyright ©2014 Pearson Education, Inc. All rights reserved.5-27 FV of Annuity: Changing PMT, N, and r 1.What will $5,000 deposited annually for 50 years be worth at 7%? FV = $2,032,644 Contribution = 250,000 (= 5000*50) 2.Change PMT = $6,000 for 50 years at 7% FV = 2,439,173 Contribution= $300,000 (= 6000*50)

29 Copyright ©2014 Pearson Education, Inc. All rights reserved.5-28 FV of Annuity: Changing PMT, N, and r 3.Change time = 60 years, $6,000 at 7% FV = $4,881,122 Contribution = 360,000 (= 6000*60) 4.Change r = 9%, 60 years, $6,000 FV = $11,668,753 Contribution = $360,000 (= 6000*60)

30 Copyright ©2014 Pearson Education, Inc. All rights reserved.5-29 Present Value of an Annuity Pensions, insurance obligations, and interest owed on bonds are all annuities. To compare these three types of investments we need to know the present value (PV) of each.

31 Copyright ©2014 Pearson Education, Inc. All rights reserved.5-30 Table 5-2

32 Copyright ©2014 Pearson Education, Inc. All rights reserved.5-31 PV of Annuity – Using the Mathematical Formulas PV of Annuity = PMT {[1 – (1 + r) –1 ]}/r = 500 (4.212) = $2,106

33 Copyright ©2014 Pearson Education, Inc. All rights reserved.5-32 Annuities Due Annuities due are ordinary annuities in which all payments have been shifted forward by one time period. Thus, with annuity due, each annuity payment occurs at the beginning of the period rather than at the end of the period.

34 Copyright ©2014 Pearson Education, Inc. All rights reserved.5-33 Annuities Due Continuing the same example: If we assume that $500 invested every year at 6% to be annuity due, the future value will increase due to compounding for one additional year. FV 5 (annuity due) = PMT {[(1 + r) n – 1]/r} (1 + r) = 500(5.637)(1.06) = $2, (versus $2, for ordinary annuity)

35 Copyright ©2014 Pearson Education, Inc. All rights reserved.5-34 MAKING INTEREST RATES COMPARABLE

36 Copyright ©2014 Pearson Education, Inc. All rights reserved.5-35 Making Interest Rates Comparable We cannot compare rates with different compounding periods. For example, 5% compounded annually is not the same as 5% percent compounded quarterly. To make the rates comparable, we compute the annual percentage yield (APY) or effective annual rate (EAR).

37 Copyright ©2014 Pearson Education, Inc. All rights reserved.5-36 Quoted Rate versus Effective Rate Quoted rate could be very different from the effective rate if compounding is not done annually. Example: $1 invested at 1% per month will grow to $ (= $1.00(1.01) 12 ) in one year. Thus even though the interest rate may be quoted as 12% compounded monthly, the effective annual rate or APY is 12.68%.

38 Copyright ©2014 Pearson Education, Inc. All rights reserved.5-37 Quoted Rate versus Effective Rate EAR = (1 + quoted rate/m) m – 1 Where m = number of compounding periods = ( /12) 12 – 1 = (1.01) 12 – 1 = or %

39 Copyright ©2014 Pearson Education, Inc. All rights reserved.5-38 Table 5-4

40 Copyright ©2014 Pearson Education, Inc. All rights reserved.5-39 Finding PV and FV with Nonannual Periods If interest is not paid annually, we need to change the interest rate and time period to reflect the nonannual periods while computing PV and FV. r = stated rate/# of compounding periods N = # of years * # of compounding periods in a year Example: If your investment earns 10% a year, with quarterly compounding for 10 years, what should we use for “r” and “N”? r = 0.10/4 = or 2.5% N = 10*4 = 40 periods

41 Copyright ©2014 Pearson Education, Inc. All rights reserved.5-40 THE PRESENT VALUE OF AN UNEVEN STREAM AND PERPETUITIES

42 Copyright ©2014 Pearson Education, Inc. All rights reserved.5-41 The Present Value of an Uneven Stream Some cash flow stream may not follow a conventional pattern. For example, the cash flows may be erratic (with some positive cash flows and some negative cash flows) or cash flows may be a combination of single cash flows and annuity (as illustrated in Table 5-5).

43 Copyright ©2014 Pearson Education, Inc. All rights reserved.5-42 Table 5-5

44 Copyright ©2014 Pearson Education, Inc. All rights reserved.5-43 Table 5-7

45 Copyright ©2014 Pearson Education, Inc. All rights reserved.5-44 Key Terms Amortized loans Annuity Annuity due Annuity future value factor Annuity present value factor Compound annuity Compound interest Effective annual rate Future value Future value factor Ordinary annuity Present value Present value factor Perpetuity Simple interest

46 Copyright ©2014 Pearson Education, Inc. All rights reserved.5-45 Table 5-6


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