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RED SLIDE: These are notes that are very important and should be recorded in your science journal. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy.

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Presentation on theme: "RED SLIDE: These are notes that are very important and should be recorded in your science journal. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy."— Presentation transcript:

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3 RED SLIDE: These are notes that are very important and should be recorded in your science journal. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

4 -Nice neat notes that are legible and use indentations when appropriate. -Example of indent. -Skip a line between topics -Don’t skip pages -Make visuals clear and well drawn. Please label. Prokaryotic Eukaryotic DNA / Nucleoid Nucleus Flagella Pili

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10 RED SLIDE: These are notes that are very important and should be recorded in your science journal. BLACK SLIDE: Pay attention, follow directions, complete projects as described and answer required questions neatly. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

11 Keep an eye out for “The-Owl” and raise your hand as soon as you see him. –He will be hiding somewhere in the slideshow Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

12 Keep an eye out for “The-Owl” and raise your hand as soon as you see him. –He will be hiding somewhere in the slideshow “Hoot, Hoot” “Good Luck!” Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

13 Activity! Observing Sewer Lice (Pediculus deficus) Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

14 Larger Cousin of (Pediculus humanus) Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

15 Sewer Lice –Discovered in 2003 by Dr. Katie Matthews in a sewer system of Cleveland, Ohio. –Largest of the dark colored louse. –Is a food source for many animals. –Can be found in fecal samples in the sewer. –Has a very fleshy mesocarp. –Decreases in size when dries up. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

16 Sewer Lice –Discovered in 2003 by Dr. Katie Matthews in a sewer system of Cleveland, Ohio. –Largest of the dark colored louse. –Is a food source for many animals. –Can be found in fecal samples in the sewer. –Has a very fleshy mesocarp. –Decreases in size when dries up. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

17 Sewer Lice –Discovered in 2003 by Dr. Katie Matthews in a sewer system of Cleveland, Ohio. –Largest of the dark colored louse. –Is a food source for many animals. –Can be found in fecal samples in the sewer. –Has a very fleshy mesocarp. –Decreases in size when dries up. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

18 Sewer Lice –Discovered in 2003 by Dr. Katie Matthews in a sewer system of Cleveland, Ohio. –Largest of the dark colored louse. –Is a food source for many animals. –Can be found in fecal samples in the sewer. –Has a very fleshy mesocarp. –Decreases in size when dries up. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

19 Sewer Lice –Discovered in 2003 by Dr. Katie Matthews in a sewer system of Cleveland, Ohio. –Largest of the dark colored louse. –Is a food source for many animals. –Can be found in fecal samples in the sewer. –Has a very fleshy mesocarp. –Decreases in size when dries up. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

20 Sewer Lice –Discovered in 2003 by Dr. Katie Matthews in a sewer system of Cleveland, Ohio. –Largest of the dark colored louse. –Is a food source for many animals. –Can be found in fecal samples in the sewer. –Has a very fleshy mesocarp. –Decreases in size when it dries up. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

21 Cells Available Sheet for Classwork.

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23 Please observe and record all of the sewer lice behaviors for a few minutes from your desk. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

24 Please observe and record all of the sewer lice behaviors for a few minutes from your desk. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

25 Close up pictures of… Sewer LiceSewer Water

26 Close up pictures of… Sewer LiceSewer Water

27 Close up pictures of… Sewer LiceSewer Water

28 Close up pictures of… Sewer LiceSewer Water

29 Close up pictures of… Sewer LiceSewer Water

30 The carbonation in the Ginger Ale creates bubbles that get caught in the wrinkles of the raisin. When enough bubbles are trapped the raisin rises to the surface, releases the bubbles, and then sinks to the bottom.

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32 The carbonation in the Ginger Ale creates bubbles that get caught in the wrinkles of the raisin. When enough bubbles are trapped the raisin rises to the surface, releases the bubbles, and then sinks to the bottom. Not Living 

33 Area of Focus: What does it mean to be living? Area of Focus: What does it mean to be living? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

34 What does it mean to be living? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

35 Video! Introduction to the Characteristics of Life…Maybe. –http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=juxLuo-sH6Mhttp://www.youtube.com/watch?v=juxLuo-sH6M

36 Organism: Any living thing Organism: Any living thing Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

37 Characteristics of living things Characteristics of living things Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

38 Made of SPONCH ingredients. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

39 Made of SPONCH ingredients. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

40 Made of SPONCH ingredients. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

41 CHNOPS / SPONCH (2:36)CHNOPS / SPONCH (2:36) –http://video.pbs.org/video/ /http://video.pbs.org/video/ / Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

42 25 of the 92 naturally occurring elements are essential for life.25 of the 92 naturally occurring elements are essential for life. –- Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

43 25 of the 92 naturally occurring elements are essential for life.25 of the 92 naturally occurring elements are essential for life. –SPONCH elements are the most biologically important. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

44 Organic Chemistry: The chemistry of carbon compounds.

45 –Carbon is the duct tape of life. It holds everything together.

46 Percentage of SPONCH elements in living things.Percentage of SPONCH elements in living things. S. Sulfur TraceS. Sulfur Trace P. Phosphorus 1.0%P. Phosphorus 1.0% O. Oxygen 65.0%O. Oxygen 65.0% N. Nitrogen 3.3%N. Nitrogen 3.3% C. Carbon 18.5%C. Carbon 18.5% H. Hydrogen 9.56%H. Hydrogen 9.56% Other (Trace) 3.0%Other (Trace) 3.0% Sulfur, Sodium, Magnesium, Copper, Zinc, Selenium, Molybdenum, Fluorine, Chlorine, Iodine, Manganese, Cobalt, Iron Lithium, Strontium, Aluminum, Silicon, Lead, Vanadium, Arsenic, BromineSulfur, Sodium, Magnesium, Copper, Zinc, Selenium, Molybdenum, Fluorine, Chlorine, Iodine, Manganese, Cobalt, Iron Lithium, Strontium, Aluminum, Silicon, Lead, Vanadium, Arsenic, Bromine Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

47 Percentage of SPONCH elements in living things.Percentage of SPONCH elements in living things. S. Sulfur TraceS. Sulfur Trace P. Phosphorus 1.0%P. Phosphorus 1.0% O. Oxygen 65.0%O. Oxygen 65.0% N. Nitrogen 3.3%N. Nitrogen 3.3% C. Carbon 18.5%C. Carbon 18.5% H. Hydrogen 9.56%H. Hydrogen 9.56% Other (Trace) 3.0%Other (Trace) 3.0% Sulfur, Sodium, Magnesium, Copper, Zinc, Selenium, Molybdenum, Fluorine, Chlorine, Iodine, Manganese, Cobalt, Iron Lithium, Strontium, Aluminum, Silicon, Lead, Vanadium, Arsenic, BromineSulfur, Sodium, Magnesium, Copper, Zinc, Selenium, Molybdenum, Fluorine, Chlorine, Iodine, Manganese, Cobalt, Iron Lithium, Strontium, Aluminum, Silicon, Lead, Vanadium, Arsenic, Bromine Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

48 Percentage of SPONCH elements in living things.Percentage of SPONCH elements in living things. S. Sulfur TraceS. Sulfur Trace P. Phosphorus 1.0%P. Phosphorus 1.0% O. Oxygen 65.0%O. Oxygen 65.0% N. Nitrogen 3.3%N. Nitrogen 3.3% C. Carbon 18.5%C. Carbon 18.5% H. Hydrogen 9.56%H. Hydrogen 9.56% Other (Trace) 3.0%Other (Trace) 3.0% Sulfur, Sodium, Magnesium, Copper, Zinc, Selenium, Molybdenum, Fluorine, Chlorine, Iodine, Manganese, Cobalt, Iron Lithium, Strontium, Aluminum, Silicon, Lead, Vanadium, Arsenic, BromineSulfur, Sodium, Magnesium, Copper, Zinc, Selenium, Molybdenum, Fluorine, Chlorine, Iodine, Manganese, Cobalt, Iron Lithium, Strontium, Aluminum, Silicon, Lead, Vanadium, Arsenic, Bromine Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

49 Percentage of SPONCH elements in living things.Percentage of SPONCH elements in living things. S. Sulfur TraceS. Sulfur Trace P. Phosphorus 1.0%P. Phosphorus 1.0% O. Oxygen 65.0%O. Oxygen 65.0% N. Nitrogen 3.3%N. Nitrogen 3.3% C. Carbon 18.5%C. Carbon 18.5% H. Hydrogen 9.56%H. Hydrogen 9.56% Other (Trace) 3.0%Other (Trace) 3.0% Sulfur, Sodium, Magnesium, Copper, Zinc, Selenium, Molybdenum, Fluorine, Chlorine, Iodine, Manganese, Cobalt, Iron Lithium, Strontium, Aluminum, Silicon, Lead, Vanadium, Arsenic, BromineSulfur, Sodium, Magnesium, Copper, Zinc, Selenium, Molybdenum, Fluorine, Chlorine, Iodine, Manganese, Cobalt, Iron Lithium, Strontium, Aluminum, Silicon, Lead, Vanadium, Arsenic, Bromine Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

50 Percentage of SPONCH elements in living things.Percentage of SPONCH elements in living things. S. Sulfur TraceS. Sulfur Trace P. Phosphorus 1.0%P. Phosphorus 1.0% O. Oxygen 65.0%O. Oxygen 65.0% N. Nitrogen 3.3%N. Nitrogen 3.3% C. Carbon 18.5%C. Carbon 18.5% H. Hydrogen 9.56%H. Hydrogen 9.56% Other (Trace) 3.0%Other (Trace) 3.0% Sulfur, Sodium, Magnesium, Copper, Zinc, Selenium, Molybdenum, Fluorine, Chlorine, Iodine, Manganese, Cobalt, Iron Lithium, Strontium, Aluminum, Silicon, Lead, Vanadium, Arsenic, BromineSulfur, Sodium, Magnesium, Copper, Zinc, Selenium, Molybdenum, Fluorine, Chlorine, Iodine, Manganese, Cobalt, Iron Lithium, Strontium, Aluminum, Silicon, Lead, Vanadium, Arsenic, Bromine Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

51 Percentage of SPONCH elements in living things.Percentage of SPONCH elements in living things. S. Sulfur TraceS. Sulfur Trace P. Phosphorus 1.0%P. Phosphorus 1.0% O. Oxygen 65.0%O. Oxygen 65.0% N. Nitrogen 3.3%N. Nitrogen 3.3% C. Carbon 18.5%C. Carbon 18.5% H. Hydrogen 9.56%H. Hydrogen 9.56% Other (Trace) 3.0%Other (Trace) 3.0% Sulfur, Sodium, Magnesium, Copper, Zinc, Selenium, Molybdenum, Fluorine, Chlorine, Iodine, Manganese, Cobalt, Iron Lithium, Strontium, Aluminum, Silicon, Lead, Vanadium, Arsenic, BromineSulfur, Sodium, Magnesium, Copper, Zinc, Selenium, Molybdenum, Fluorine, Chlorine, Iodine, Manganese, Cobalt, Iron Lithium, Strontium, Aluminum, Silicon, Lead, Vanadium, Arsenic, Bromine Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

52 Percentage of SPONCH elements in living things.Percentage of SPONCH elements in living things. S. Sulfur TraceS. Sulfur Trace P. Phosphorus 1.0%P. Phosphorus 1.0% O. Oxygen 65.0%O. Oxygen 65.0% N. Nitrogen 3.3%N. Nitrogen 3.3% C. Carbon 18.5%C. Carbon 18.5% H. Hydrogen 9.56%H. Hydrogen 9.56% Other (Trace) 3.0%Other (Trace) 3.0% Sulfur, Sodium, Magnesium, Copper, Zinc, Selenium, Molybdenum, Fluorine, Chlorine, Iodine, Manganese, Cobalt, Iron Lithium, Strontium, Aluminum, Silicon, Lead, Vanadium, Arsenic, BromineSulfur, Sodium, Magnesium, Copper, Zinc, Selenium, Molybdenum, Fluorine, Chlorine, Iodine, Manganese, Cobalt, Iron Lithium, Strontium, Aluminum, Silicon, Lead, Vanadium, Arsenic, Bromine Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

53 Percentage of SPONCH elements in living things.Percentage of SPONCH elements in living things. S. Sulfur TraceS. Sulfur Trace P. Phosphorus 1.0%P. Phosphorus 1.0% O. Oxygen 65.0%O. Oxygen 65.0% N. Nitrogen 3.3%N. Nitrogen 3.3% C. Carbon 18.5%C. Carbon 18.5% H. Hydrogen 9.56%H. Hydrogen 9.56% Other (Trace) 3.0%Other (Trace) 3.0% Sulfur, Sodium, Magnesium, Copper, Zinc, Selenium, Molybdenum, Fluorine, Chlorine, Iodine, Manganese, Cobalt, Iron Lithium, Strontium, Aluminum, Silicon, Lead, Vanadium, Arsenic, BromineSulfur, Sodium, Magnesium, Copper, Zinc, Selenium, Molybdenum, Fluorine, Chlorine, Iodine, Manganese, Cobalt, Iron Lithium, Strontium, Aluminum, Silicon, Lead, Vanadium, Arsenic, Bromine Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

54 Percentage of SPONCH elements in living things.Percentage of SPONCH elements in living things. S. Sulfur TraceS. Sulfur Trace P. Phosphorus 1.0%P. Phosphorus 1.0% O. Oxygen 65.0%O. Oxygen 65.0% N. Nitrogen 3.3%N. Nitrogen 3.3% C. Carbon 18.5%C. Carbon 18.5% H. Hydrogen 9.56%H. Hydrogen 9.56% Other (Trace) 3.0%Other (Trace) 3.0% Sulfur, Sodium, Magnesium, Copper, Zinc, Selenium, Molybdenum, Fluorine, Chlorine, Iodine, Manganese, Cobalt, Iron Lithium, Strontium, Aluminum, Silicon, Lead, Vanadium, Arsenic, BromineSulfur, Sodium, Magnesium, Copper, Zinc, Selenium, Molybdenum, Fluorine, Chlorine, Iodine, Manganese, Cobalt, Iron Lithium, Strontium, Aluminum, Silicon, Lead, Vanadium, Arsenic, Bromine Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

55 Cells Available Sheet for Classwork.

56 Activity! Please complete an animal graph of the data. –Percentages shown after instructions. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

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65 Percentage of SPONCH elements in living things.Percentage of SPONCH elements in living things. S. Sulfur TraceS. Sulfur Trace P. Phosphorus 1.0%P. Phosphorus 1.0% O. Oxygen 65.0%O. Oxygen 65.0% N. Nitrogen 3.3%N. Nitrogen 3.3% C. Carbon 18.5%C. Carbon 18.5% H. Hydrogen 9.56%H. Hydrogen 9.56% Other (Trace) 3.0%Other (Trace) 3.0% Sulfur, Sodium, Magnesium, Copper, Zinc, Selenium, Molybdenum, Fluorine, Chlorine, Iodine, Manganese, Cobalt, Iron Lithium, Strontium, Aluminum, Silicon, Lead, Vanadium, Arsenic, BromineSulfur, Sodium, Magnesium, Copper, Zinc, Selenium, Molybdenum, Fluorine, Chlorine, Iodine, Manganese, Cobalt, Iron Lithium, Strontium, Aluminum, Silicon, Lead, Vanadium, Arsenic, Bromine Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

66 Molecules of Life. Advanced (Optional) –http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QWf2jcznLsYhttp://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QWf2jcznLsY Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

67 Characteristics of living things Characteristics of living things Made of SPONCH ingredients. Made of SPONCH ingredients Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

68 Made of cells. Made of cells. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

69 Moves. Moves. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

70 Plants have limited movement but they can move.

71 Responds to a stimulus. Responds to a stimulus. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

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73 “You will be given one minute to calm down.”

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75 Uses Energy. Uses Energy. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

76 Adjusts to Changes. Adjusts to Changes. Maintains steady body conditions. Maintains steady body conditions. Maintains homeostasis. Maintains homeostasis. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

77 Adjusts to Changes. Adjusts to Changes. Maintains steady body conditions. Maintains steady body conditions. Maintains homeostasis. Maintains homeostasis. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

78 Adjusts to Changes. Adjusts to Changes. Maintains steady body conditions. Maintains steady body conditions. called homeostasis. called homeostasis. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

79 Reproduces. Reproduces. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

80 Has a life span. Has a life span. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

81 Grows and Develops. Grows and Develops. Grow-To increase in size. Grow-To increase in size. Develop-To change in ability. Develop-To change in ability. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

82 Grows and Develops. Grows and Develops. Grow-To increase in size. Grow-To increase in size. Develop-To change in ability. Develop-To change in ability. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

83 Grows and Develops. Grows and Develops. Grow-To increase in size. Grow-To increase in size. Develop-To change in ability. Develop-To change in ability. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

84 Adapts to Change. Adapts to Change. Evolves / Inherits traits that promote survival. Evolves / Inherits traits that promote survival. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

85 Adapts to Change. Adapts to Change. Evolves / Inherits traits that promote survival. Evolves / Inherits traits that promote survival. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

86 Adapts to Change. Adapts to Change. Evolves / Inherits traits that promote survival. Evolves / Inherits traits that promote survival. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy Learn more about characteristics of life at…

87 Which is not a characteristics of living things? Moves Made of cells Does not use energy Maintains homeostasis with environment Grows and develops Reacts to a stimulus Reproduces by exchanging it’s own DNA It evolves over time Has a life span Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

88 Which is not a characteristics of living things? Answer: Moves Made of cells Does not use energy Maintains homeostasis with environment Grows and develops Reacts to a stimulus Reproduces by exchanging it’s own DNA It evolves over time Has a life span Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

89 Which is not a characteristics of living things? Answer: Moves Made of cells Does not use energy Maintains homeostasis with environment Grows and develops Reacts to a stimulus Reproduces by exchanging it’s own DNA It evolves over time Has a life span Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

90 Which is not a characteristics of living things? Answer: Moves Made of cells Uses energy Maintains homeostasis with environment Grows and develops Reacts to a stimulus Reproduces by exchanging it’s own DNA It evolves over time Has a life span Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

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92 Which is not a characteristics of living things? Moves Made of cells Uses energy Maintains homeostasis with environment Grows and develops Reacts to a stimulus Reproduces by exchanging it’s own DNA Cannot evolve over time Has a life span Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

93 Which is not a characteristics of living things? and the answer is… Moves Made of cells Uses energy Maintains homeostasis with environment Grows and develops Reacts to a stimulus Reproduces by exchanging it’s own DNA Cannot evolve over time Has a life span Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

94 Which is not a characteristics of living things? and the answer is… Moves Made of cells Uses energy Maintains homeostasis with environment Grows and develops Reacts to a stimulus Reproduces by exchanging it’s own DNA Cannot evolve over time Has a life span Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

95 Which is not a characteristics of living things? and the answer is… Moves Made of cells Uses energy Maintains homeostasis with environment Grows and develops Reacts to a stimulus Reproduces by exchanging it’s own DNA Evolves over time Has a life span Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

96 Do turtles spontaneously emerge from the sand as new life?

97 Answer. No, turtles lay eggs in the sand that hatch into baby turtles.

98 Spontaneous origin (abiogenesis): Life came from non-living materials.Spontaneous origin (abiogenesis): Life came from non-living materials. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

99 On Origins Optional PowerPoint in activities folder.On Origins Optional PowerPoint in activities folder. –This can also be run at the end of the unit. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

100 Cells Available Sheet for Classwork.

101 Francesco Redi – (1668) –People believed flies spontaneously came from meat. –Redi covered one flask, left one open to air –Observed flies laying eggs on meat. –Flies come from flies. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

102 Francesco Redi – (1668) –People believed flies spontaneously came from meat. –Redi covered one flask, left one open to air –Observed flies laying eggs on meat. –Flies come from flies. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

103 Francesco Redi – (1668) –People believed flies spontaneously came from meat. –Redi covered one flask, left one open to air. –Observed flies laying eggs on meat. –Flies come from flies. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

104 Francesco Redi – (1668) –People believed flies spontaneously came from meat. –Redi covered one flask, left one open to air. –Observed flies laying eggs on meat. –Flies come from flies. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

105 Francesco Redi – (1668) –People believed flies spontaneously came from meat. –Redi covered one flask, left one open to air. –Observed flies laying eggs on meat. –Flies come from flies. Life comes from life. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

106 Francesco Redi – (1668) –People believed flies spontaneously came from meat. –Redi covered one flask, left one open to air. –Observed flies laying eggs on meat. –Flies come from flies. Life comes from life. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

107 Francesco Redi – (1668) –People believed flies spontaneously came from meat. –Redi covered one flask, left one open to air. –Observed flies laying eggs on meat. –Flies come from flies. Life comes from life. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

108 Francesco Redi – (1668) –People believed flies spontaneously came from meat. –Redi covered one flask, left one open to air. –Observed flies laying eggs on meat. –Flies come from flies. Life comes from life. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

109 Francesco Redi – (1668) –People believed flies spontaneously came from meat. –Redi covered one flask, left one open to air. –Observed flies laying eggs on meat. –Flies come from flies. Life comes from life. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

110 Francesco Redi – (1668) –People believed flies spontaneously came from meat. –Redi covered one flask, left one open to air. –Observed flies laying eggs on meat. –Flies come from flies. Life comes from life. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy Learn more about experiment at… Learn more about experiment at…

111 Life only comes from pre-existing life. Except of course for the first form of life. Science has disproven but also suggests abiogenesis. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

112 Cells Available Sheet for Classwork.

113 Pasteur' s experiments (1860' s) showed that micro-organisms are even carried in the air. Both flasks boiled to sterilize Micro-organisms trapped in swan Open to air (broth spoils). and broth does not spoil. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

114 Pasteur' s experiments (1860' s) showed that micro-organisms are even carried in the air. Both flasks boiled to sterilize Micro-organisms trapped in swan Open to air (broth spoils). and broth does not spoil. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

115 Pasteur' s experiments (1860' s) showed that micro-organisms are even carried in the air. Both flasks boiled to sterilize Micro-organisms trapped in swan Open to air (broth spoils). and broth does not spoil. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

116 Pasteur' s experiments (1860' s) showed that micro-organisms are even carried in the air. Both flasks boiled to sterilize Micro-organisms trapped in swan Open to air (broth spoils). and broth does not spoil. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

117 Pasteur' s experiments (1860' s) showed that micro-organisms are even carried in the air. Both flasks boiled to sterilize Micro-organisms trapped in swan Open to air (broth spoils). and broth does not spoil. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

118 Pasteur' s experiments (1860' s) showed that micro-organisms are even carried in the air. Both flasks boiled to sterilize Micro-organisms trapped in swan Open to air (broth spoils). and broth does not spoil. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

119 Pasteur' s experiments (1860' s) showed that micro-organisms are even carried in the air. Both flasks boiled to sterilize Micro-organisms trapped in swan Open to air (broth spoils). and broth does not spoil. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

120 Pasteur' s experiments (1860' s) showed that micro-organisms are even carried in the air. Both flasks boiled to sterilize Micro-organisms trapped in swan Open to air (broth spoils). and broth does not spoil. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

121 Pasteur' s experiments (1860' s) showed that micro-organisms are even carried in the air. Both flasks boiled to sterilize Micro-organisms trapped in swan Open to air (broth spoils). and broth does not spoil. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

122 Pasteur' s experiments (1860' s) showed that micro-organisms are even carried in the air. Both flasks boiled to sterilize Micro-organisms trapped in swan Open to air (broth spoils). and broth does not spoil. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

123 Pasteur' s experiments (1860' s) showed that micro-organisms are even carried in the air. Both flasks boiled to sterilize Micro-organisms trapped in swan Open to air (broth spoils). and broth does not spoil. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

124 Pasteur' s experiments (1860' s) showed that micro-organisms are even carried in the air. Both flasks boiled to sterilize Micro-organisms trapped in swan Open to air (broth spoils). and broth does not spoil. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

125 Pasteur' s experiments (1860' s) showed that micro-organisms are even carried in the air. Both flasks boiled to sterilize Micro-organisms trapped in swan Open to air (broth spoils). and broth does not spoil. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

126 Pasteur' s experiments (1860' s) showed that micro-organisms are even carried in the air. Both flasks boiled to sterilize Micro-organisms trapped in swan Open to air (broth spoils). and broth does not spoil. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy Video Link: (4:35)

127 As a result (Pasteur) – Sterilization of tools – Helped save millions.

128 Needs of Living Things Needs of Living Things Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

129 Energy: Supplied by the sun Energy: Supplied by the sun Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

130 Oxygen: To burn the food in cells. (Respiration) Oxygen: To burn the food in cells. (Respiration) Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

131 Oxygen: To burn the food in cells. (Respiration) Oxygen: To burn the food in cells. (Respiration) Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

132 Water: To keep things moving in and out of cells. (Universal Solvent) Water: To keep things moving in and out of cells. (Universal Solvent) Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

133 Minerals- For proper chemical balance. Minerals- For proper chemical balance. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

134 You can now complete this question on your bundled homework.

135 New Area of Focus: Cellular Biology New Area of Focus: Cellular Biology Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

136 Cells Available Sheet for Classwork.

137 Activity! –Please create the following in your journal. Plant Low Plant High Animal Low Animal High Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

138 Activity! Looking at plant cells. Procedure Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

139 Activity! Looking at plant cells. Procedure –Use you finger nails to separate one layer of onion from the bulb. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

140 Activity! Looking at plant cells. Procedure –Use you finger nails to separate one layer of onion from the bulb. –Place thin layer on glass slide. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

141 Activity! Looking at plant cells. Procedure –Use you finger nails to separate one layer of onion from the bulb. –Place thin layer on glass slide. –Add one drop of water to onion layer. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

142 Activity! Looking at plant cells. Procedure –Use you finger nails to separate one layer of onion from the bulb. –Place thin layer on glass slide. –Add one drop of water to onion layer. –Gently place cover slip on top of drop. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

143 Activity! Looking at plant cells. Procedure –Use you finger nails to separate one layer of onion from the bulb. –Place thin layer on glass slide. –Add one drop of water to onion layer. –Gently place cover slip on top of drop. –Observe and make a sketch of what you see using a Petri dish to make a circle. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

144 A very dry how to make a wet mount slide video. (11 minutes)

145 Activity! Looking at animal cells. Procedure –Use a tooth pick to scratch along the inside of your cheek. –Smear the tip of the toothpick on glass slide. –Add one drop of water to the smear. –Gently place cover slip on top of drop. –Observe and make a sketch of what you see using a Petri dish to make a circle. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

146 Which is a cheek cell, and which is an onion cell? What is the difference? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

147 Which is a cheek cell, and which is an onion cell? What is the difference? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

148 Which is a cheek cell, and which is an onion cell? What is the difference? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

149 Which is a cheek cell, and which is an onion cell? What is the difference? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

150 Which is a cheek cell, and which is an onion cell? What is the difference? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

151 Which is a cheek cell, and which is an onion cell? What is the difference? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

152 Which is a cheek cell, and which is an onion cell? What is the difference? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

153 Animal Cell Plant Cell (Cheek) (Onion) Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

154 Animal Cell Plant Cell (Cheek) (Onion) Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

155 Animal Cell Plant Cell (Cheek) (Onion) Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

156 Animal Cell Plant Cell (Cheek) (Onion) Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

157 Animal Cell Plant Cell (Cheek) (Onion) Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

158 Venn Diagram Opportunity? Both have…

159 Questions? Plant Cell and Animal Cell –What are differences you noticed between a plant cell and an animal cell – Study these pictures and the next two slides. –What are the similarities? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

160 Plant or animal cell?

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163 Large Central Vacuole Large Central Vacuole

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168 Is this a plant or animal cell?

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171 Is this a plant cell or animal cell? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

172 Answer! Plant Cell. Plant cells have cell walls that perform a variety of functions.

173 Is this a plant or animal cell? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

174 Answer! A plant cell –Plants cell have photosynthetic chloroplasts that are usually green. (They have their own DNA) Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

175 Is this a plant cell, or animal cell? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

176 Answer! Plant Cell. –Plant cell have a large central vacuole to hold food, water, nutrients, and waste. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

177 Is this a plant cell, or animal cell? Why? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

178 Answer! Animal Cell. –Irregular shape, no cell wall, no central vacuole, no chloroplasts. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

179 Plant and animal cells both have… Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

180 Plant and animal cells both have… –Nucleus Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

181 Plant and animal cells both have… –Nucleus Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

182 Plant and animal cells both have… –Nucleus –Cytoplasm Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

183 Plant and animal cells both have… –Nucleus –Cytoplasm Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

184 Plant and animal cells both have… –Nucleus –Cytoplasm –Cell Membrane. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

185 Plant and animal cells both have… –Nucleus –Cytoplasm –Cell Membrane. –Other similar organelles. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

186 Plant and animal cells both have… –Nucleus –Cytoplasm –Cell Membrane. –Other similar organelles. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

187 Plant and animal cells both have… –Nucleus –Cytoplasm –Cell Membrane. –Other similar organelles. –Many of the same processes. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

188 Plant and animal cells both have… –Many of the same processes. Cellular Respiration Protein synthesis Cell transport Many more Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

189 Plant and animal cells both have… –Many of the same processes. Cellular Respiration Protein synthesis Cell transport Many more Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

190 Plant and animal cells both have… –Many of the same processes. Cellular Respiration Protein synthesis Cell transport Many more Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

191 Plant and animal cells both have… –Many of the same processes. Cellular Respiration Protein synthesis Cell transport Many more Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

192 Plant and animal cells both have… –Many of the same processes. Cellular Respiration Protein synthesis Cell transport Many more Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

193 Venn Diagram Both have…

194 Venn Diagram Both have… Smaller? Irregular shape, No cell wall, No central vacuole, No chloroplasts More mitochondria

195 Venn Diagram Both have… Smaller? Irregular shape, No cell wall, No central vacuole, No chloroplasts More mitochondria Larger? Structured shape Cell Wall, Chloroplasts Large Vacuole

196 Venn Diagram Both have… NucleusCytoplasm Cell Membrane. Other similar organelles like mitochondria Smaller? Irregular shape, No cell wall, No central vacuole, No chloroplasts More mitochondria Larger? Structured shape Cell Wall, Chloroplasts Large Vacuole

197 Venn Diagram Both have… NucleusCytoplasm Cell Membrane. Other similar organelles like mitochondria Smaller? Irregular shape, No cell wall, No central vacuole, No chloroplasts More mitochondria Larger? Structured shape Cell Wall, Chloroplasts Large Vacuole Learn more differences / similarities at…

198 Try and name some the cells in the next few pictures. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

199 Sex Cells

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209 ?

210 Bone Cell

211 ?

212 Animation of Skin Cells

213 ?

214 Muscle Cells

215 ?

216 Human Embryo at 8 Cells.

217 ?

218 Bacteria (Bacilli)

219 ?

220 Nerve Cell

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226 orm

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228 ollows

229 orm ollows

230 orm ollows unction

231 orm ollows unction

232 orm ollows unction Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

233 Form Follows Function: Parts of the cell are shaped to perform a particular job. Form Follows Function: Parts of the cell are shaped to perform a particular job. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

234 Cells Available Sheet for Classwork.

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236 Introduction to Cells PowerPoint Review Game

237 “AYE” Advance Your Exploration ELA and Literacy Opportunity Worksheet –Visit some of the many provided links or.. –Articles can be found at (w/ membership to NABT and NSTA) 1http://www.nabt.org/websites/institution/index.php?p= 1 ournal=tsthttp://learningcenter.nsta.org/browse_journals.aspx?j ournal=tst Please visit at least one of the “learn more” educational links provided in this unit and complete this worksheet.

238 “AYE” Advance Your Exploration ELA and Literacy Opportunity Worksheet –Visit some of the many provided links or.. –Articles can be found at (w/ membership to NABT and NSTA) urnal=tsthttp://learningcenter.nsta.org/browse_journals.aspx?jo urnal=tst

239 This PowerPoint is one part of my Cellular Biology Unit. This unit includes… A 3 Part 1,800 Slide PowerPoint slideshow 11 page bundled homework package that chronologically follows the PowerPoint slideshow 16 pages of unit notes with visuals for students who need assistance and support staff Video and activity links, PowerPoint review game, answers keys, rubrics, and much more. t.htmlhttp://sciencepowerpoint.com/Cellular_Biology_Uni t.html

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241 Areas of Focus within the Cellular Biology Unit Areas of Focus within the Cellular Biology Unit What is SPONCH?, Biologically Important Molecules, % of SPONCH in Living Things, What does it mean to be living?, Characteristics of Living Things, Needs of Living Things, Cellular Biology, History of Cellular Biology, Modern Cell Theory, Types of Cells, Prokaryotic Cells, Eukaryotic Cells, Cellular Organelles, Cell Wall, Plasma Membrane, Passive Transport, Diffusion, Osmosis, Active Transport, The Nucleus, DNA, Chromatin / Chromosomes, Nucleolus, Transcription, Translation Nuclear Membrane, Rough Endoplasmic Reticulum, Smooth Endoplasmic Reticulum, Ribosomes, Protein Synthesis, Golgi Apparatus, Lysosomes, Cytoskeleton / Microtubules / Microfilaments, Centrioles, Plastid, Mitochondria, Vacuoles, Organelles by real images, and much more. Full unit can be found at…

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246 Please visit the links below to learn more about each of the units in this curriculum –These units take me about four years to complete with my students in grades Earth Science UnitsExtended Tour Link and Curriculum Guide Geology Topics Unit Astronomy Topics Unit Weather and Climate Unit Soil Science, Weathering, More Water Unit Rivers Unit = Easier = More Difficult = Most Difficult 5 th – 7 th grade 6 th – 8 th grade 8 th – 10 th grade 5 th – 7 th grade 6 th – 8 th grade 8 th – 10 th grade

247 Physical Science UnitsExtended Tour Link and Curriculum Guide Science Skills Unit html Motion and Machines Unit Matter, Energy, Envs. Unit Atoms and Periodic Table Unit Life Science UnitsExtended Tour Link and Curriculum Guide Human Body / Health Topics DNA and Genetics Unit Cell Biology Unit Infectious Diseases Unit Taxonomy and Classification Unit Evolution / Natural Selection Unit Botany Topics Unit Ecology Feeding Levels Unit Ecology Interactions Unit Ecology Abiotic Factors Unit

248 Thank you for your time and interest in this curriculum tour. Please visit the welcome / guide on how a unit works and link to the many unit previews to see the PowerPoint slideshows, bundled homework, review games, unit notes, and much more. Thank you for your interest and please feel free to contact me with any questions you may have. Best wishes. Sincerely, Ryan Murphy M.Ed

249 The entire four year curriculum can be found at... Please feel free to contact me with any questions you may have. Thank you for your interest in this curriculum. Sincerely, Ryan Murphy M.Ed


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