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1 The Statement of Cash Flows C hapter 22 An electronic presentation by Norman Sunderman Angelo State University An electronic presentation by Norman Sunderman.

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Presentation on theme: "1 The Statement of Cash Flows C hapter 22 An electronic presentation by Norman Sunderman Angelo State University An electronic presentation by Norman Sunderman."— Presentation transcript:

1 1 The Statement of Cash Flows C hapter 22 An electronic presentation by Norman Sunderman Angelo State University An electronic presentation by Norman Sunderman Angelo State University COPYRIGHT © 2007 Thomson South-Western, a part of The Thomson Corporation. Thomson, the Star logo, and South-Western are trademarks used herein under license. Intermediate Accounting 10th edition Nikolai Bazley Jones

2 2 1. Define operating, investing, and financing activities. 2. Know the categories of inflows and outflows of cash. 3. Classify cash flows as operating, investing, or financing. 4. Explain the direct and indirect methods for reporting operating cash flows. 5. Prepare a simple statement of cash flows. Objectives

3 3 6. Use a worksheet for a statement of cash flows. 7. Compute and disclose interest paid and income taxes paid. 8. Identify the operating cash inflows and outflows under the direct method (Appendix). 9. Compute the operating cash flows under the direct method (Appendix). Objectives

4 4 1.A firm’s ability to generate positive cash flows from operating activities. 2.A firm’s ability to meet its obligations and pay dividends. 3.The reasons for the difference between net income and net cash flows. 4.The effect of investing and financing on a firm’s financial position. 5.Both the cash and noncash investing and financing transactions during the period. Purpose of a Cash Flow Statement Helps users assess

5 5 Operating Activities Operating activities include all transactions and other events that are not investing and financing activities. Operating activities include transactions involving acquiring, selling, and delivering goods for sale, as well as providing services. Cash receipts from the sale of goods or services and collections of accounts receivable are typical cash inflows from operating activities. Cash payments to suppliers for inventory and on account, for wages, and for taxes are examples of cash outflows from operating activities.

6 6 Investing Activities Investing activities include transactions involving noncurrent assets and short- term investments. Outflows (3)Inflows (3) 1. Lending money and collecting principal on the loans. 2. Acquiring and selling investments (both current and noncurrent). 3. Acquiring and selling property, plant, and equipment.

7 7 Financing Activities Financing activities include transactions involving liabilities & equity: Inflows (2) 1. Issuing stock for cash (new issue or treasury stock) 2. Borrowing money (bonds and notes) Outflows (3) 1. Paying cash dividends 2. Repayments of amounts borrowed 3. Purchase of treasury stock

8 8 Cash and Cash Equivalents The cash flow statement is prepared using cash and cash equivalents.  Cash equivalents ─Within 3 months of maturity when purchased ─No risk--treasury bonds, treasury notes, treasury bills, money market, commercial paper ─Known amount of cash  Purchases of cash equivalents are not reported

9 9 Indirect and Direct Methods FASB No. 95 allows two ways for a company to calculate and report its net cash flow from operating activities on its statement of cash flows.

10 10 Indirect and Direct Methods Even though the FASB recommends the direct method, more than 98% of companies use the indirect method. The first is called the direct method and the second is the indirect method.

11 11 Indirect Method Example

12 12 Steps in Visual Inspection Method-Indirect Method 1. Prepare the statement’s heading and list the three major sections. 2. Determine the net income and list it as the first item in the net cash flow from operating activities section. 3. Add back any non-cash expenses. 4. Adjust net income for gains and losses not related to operations. ContinuedContinued

13 13 5. Adjust net income for the change in deferred taxes 6. Adjust net income for income and losses on investments carried under the equity method. ContinuedContinued Steps in Visual Inspection Method-Indirect Method

14 14 7. Examine all working capital accounts, except cash, short-term non-trade notes payable and dividends payable. D D A Debit to a noncash account is a Decrease in cash. (If the account had net debits during the year). A Credit to a noncash account is an increase in cash. (if the account had net credits during the year). ContinuedContinued Steps in Visual Inspection Method-Indirect Method

15 15 8. Calculate the cash provided or cash used by operating activities. 9. Examine comparative balance sheets for changes in non-current assets. 10. Calculate the cash provided or cash used by investing activities. 11. Examine long-term liabilities and equity accounts. ContinuedContinued Steps in Visual Inspection Method-Indirect Method

16 Calculate the cash provided or cash used by financing activities. 13. Calculate the net change in cash that occurred during the accounting period. 14. Add the beginning cash 15. The total should equal the ending cash on the balance sheet 16. List interest and taxes paid. 17. List significant noncash investing and financing activities. Steps in Visual Inspection Method-Indirect Method

17 17 Simple Statement of Cash Flows RYAN COMPANY Statement of Cash Flows For Year Ended December 31, 2007 The statement’s heading

18 18 Adjustments to Net Income Remember the adjustments to net income are: Noncash expenses Gains/losses on investments Deferred taxes Equity income Working capital changes Remember the adjustments to net income are: Noncash expenses Gains/losses on investments Deferred taxes Equity income Working capital changes

19 19 Indirect Method- Ryan Corporation Net Cash flows From Operating Activities: Net income$14,000 Adjustments for differences between income flows and cash flows for operating activities: Add:Depreciation expense8,000 Decrease in accounts receivable2,600 Increase in salaries payable800 Less:Increase in inventory(2,000) Decrease in accounts payable(7,000) Net cash provided by operating activities$16,400 Added back since depreciation is not an outflow of cash. Same number as direct method Credits to noncashaccounts Debits to noncashaccounts

20 20 Leyton Company Information Page 1140

21 21 Simple Statement of Cash Flows-Leyton Company Net Cash Flow From Operating Activities Net income$ 7,000 Adjustments for differences between income and cash flows from operating activities: Add: Depreciation expense2,300 Increase in accounts payable1,500 Less:Increase in accounts receivable(2,700)1,100 Net cash provided by operating activities$8,100 Cash Flows From Investing Activities Payment for purchase of building$(12,000) Proceeds from sale of land, at cost 3,000 Net cash used for investing activities(9,000) ContinuedContinued

22 22 Simple Statement of Cash Flows Net cash provided by operating activities$8,100 Net cash used for investing activities(9,000) Cash Flows From Financing Activities Proceeds from issuance of bonds$ 7,000 Payment of dividends(3,500) Net cash provided by financing activities 3,500 Net increase in Cash$2,600 Cash, January 1, 20074,000 Cash, December 31, 2007$6,600 This amount should match the balance of the Cash account in the ledger.

23 23 Sale of Equipment Dack Company sold equipment with a cost of $2,200 and accumulated depreciation of $700 for $2,100. Gains and losses from investing activities should be eliminated from operating activities by adding losses and deducting gains from net income.

24 24 Historical cost2,200 Less: Accumulated depreciation700 Book value$1,500 Gain (not operating)? Cash proceeds$2,100 Deduct $600 from net income to reconcile net income to operating cash. Sale of Equipment

25 25 Interest Paid and Income Taxes Paid FASB Statement Number 95 requires that a company using the indirect method also disclose its interest paid and income taxes paid.

26 26 Interest ExpenseInterest Payable Bal. 0 1,100 Jones Company had $1,100 of interest expense, including $100 amortization of bond discount. The beginning balance in Interest Payable was $0 and the ending balance was $500. How much cash was paid for interest? 1,000 Cash Paid 500 Bal. 500 = $1,000 $100 discount amortization will not require cash Interest Paid

27 27 Taxes Payable/Deferred Taxes Cash Paid 2,820 1,500Bal.--Taxes Payable 1,920Bal.--Deferred Taxes 2,130Bal.--Taxes Payable 2,100Bal.--Deferred Taxes The beginning and ending balances in Taxes Payable were $1,500 and $2,130 and the beginning and ending balances in Deferred Taxes were $1,920 and $2,100. Tax Expense was $3,630. How much cash was paid? 3,630Taxes Expense = $7,050 Taxes Paid Taxes Payable and Deferred Taxes can be combined to find taxes paid.

28 28 Direct Method Under the direct method, a company deducts its operating cash outflows from its operating cash inflows to determine its net cash flow from operating activities.

29 29 Direct Method Inflows (3) 1.Cash from customers (A/R) 2.Cash from interest revenue (Interest Receivable) 3.Cash from dividend revenue (Dividends Rec.) Outflows (5) 1.Cash paid to suppliers (A/P) 2.Cash paid for wages (Wages Payable) 3.Other cash expenses (Prepaid/Accrued) 4.Cash paid for interest expense (Interest Payable) 5.Cash paid for taxes (T/P and Deferred Tax)

30 30 Direct Method Use T accounts to examine the 3 inflows and 5 outflows in the direct method.

31 31 Sales RevenueAccounts Receivable Bal. 0 30,000 42,000 Smith Company made cash sales of $30,000 and credit sales of $42,000. How much cash was collected from customers? 42,000 Bal. 5,000 37,000 $67,000 Cash From Customers

32 32 Interest ReceivableDividends Receivable Bal. 0 Revenue 4,000 Bal. 1,000 Bal. 30,000 Revenue 42,000 Bal. 12,000 Ives Company earned interest revenue of $42,000 & dividend revenue of $4,000. Interest Receivable had a beginning balance of $30,000 and an ending balance of $12,000. Dividends receivable had a beginning balance of $0 and an ending balance of $1,000. How much cash from interest and dividends was collected? Dividends and Interest Collected

33 33 Interest ReceivableDividends Receivable Bal. 0 Revenue 4,000 Bal. 1,000 Bal. 30,000 Revenue 42,000 Bal. 12,000 Ives Company earned interest revenue of $42,000 and dividend revenue of $4,000. During the year $60,000 of interest and $3,000 of dividends was collected. 60,0003,000 Dividends and Interest Collected =72,000 =4,000

34 34 Cash Paid to Suppliers Copeland Company had beginning and ending balances in Accounts Payable of $10,300 and $12,100, respectively. The beginning and ending balances in inventory were $12,500 and $11,000 respectively. The cost of goods sold was $51,000. How much cash was paid to suppliers? Accounts PayableInventory Bal.12,500 Bal.11,000 10,300 12,100 51,000 Cost of goods sold 49,500 Purchases 49,500 Cash paid $47,700 62,000 59,800 62,000

35 35 Prepaid/Accrued Expenses Prepaid Bal. 20,000 Prepaid Bal. 12,000 60,000 Accrued Bal. 300,000 Cash operating expenses 32,000 Accrued Bal. Wolverine Company had beginning and ending balances in accrued expenses of $60,000 and $32,000, respectively. It had beginning and ending balances in prepaid expenses of $20,000 and $12,000, respectively. It had cash operating expenses of $300,000. How much cash was paid for expenses? Prepaid and accrued expenses can be combined to calculate the cash paid. Cash operating expenses exclude depreciation, amortization and depletion. =$372,000 Cash Expenses

36 36 Wolverine Company paid $320,000 for expenses. Prepaid/Accrued Expenses Prepaid Bal. 20,000 Cash paid 320,000 Prepaid Bal. 12,000 60,000 Accrued Bal. 300,000 Cash operating expenses 32,000 Accrued Bal. Cash Expenses

37 37 Cash Paid to Employees Smith Company had beginning and balances in Salaries Payable of $0 and $1,000. respectively. Salary expense for the year was $14,000. How much cash was paid to employees? Salaries Payable Cash paid 13,000 0Bal. 14,000Salaries expense 1,000Bal.

38 38 Sales revenue (cash and A/R)$70,000 Less: Cost of goods sold (cash and A/P)$(29,000) Salaries expense (cash and S/P)(13,000) Depreciation expense (8,000)(50,000) Income before income taxes$20,000 Income tax expense (cash) (6,000) Net income$14,000 Ryan Corporation’s Income Statement Direct Method

39 39 Sales RevenueAccounts Receivable Bal.22,600 70,000 Accounts receivable decreased by $2,600 for Ryan Company. How much cash was collected from customers? 70,000 Bal. 20,000 72,600 $72,600 Cash From Customers- Ryan Company

40 40 Direct Method Inflows (3) 1.Cash from customers (A/R) 2.Cash from interest revenue (Interest Receivable) 3.Cash from dividend revenue (Dividends Rec.) Outflows (5) 1.Cash paid to suppliers (A/P) 2.Cash paid for wages (Wages Payable) 3.Other cash expenses (Prepaid/Accrued) 4.Cash paid for interest expense (Interest Payable) 5.Cash paid for taxes (T/P and Deferred Tax) Remember to check for these cash flows.

41 41 Cash Paid to Suppliers- Ryan Company Ryan Company had beginning and ending balances in Accounts Payable of $10,300 and $3,300, respectively. The beginning and ending balances in inventory were $9,000 and $11,000 respectively. The cost of goods sold was $29,000. How much cash was paid to suppliers? Accounts PayableInventory Bal.9,000 Bal.11,000 10,300 3,300 29,000 Cost of goods sold 31,000 Purchases 31,000 Cash paid $38,000

42 42 Cash Paid to Employees- Ryan Company Ryan Company had beginning and balances in Salaries Payable of $200 and $1,000. respectively. Salary expense for the year was $13,000. How much cash was paid to employees? Salaries Payable Cash paid 12, Bal. 13,000Salaries expense 1,000Bal. Ryan Company had no change in the Taxes Payable and Deferred Taxes accounts.

43 43 Cash flows From Operating Activities: Cash Inflows: Cash received from customers$72,600 Cash inflows from operating activities$72,600 Cash Outflows: Cash paid to suppliers$(38,000) Cash paid to employees(12,200) Cash paid for income taxes (6,000) Cash outflows for operating activities(56,200) Net cash provided by operating activities$16,400 Direct Method-Ryan Company

44 44 Reconciliation of Net Income to Cash Provided by Operations- Direct Method When the direct method is used, a schedule to reconcile net income to cash provided by operations is required. In other words, the indirect method is required even when using the direct method. Yes.

45 45 Step 1: Prepare the column headings on a worksheet. Then enter the account title Cash on the first line of the account titles column and list the beginning balance, ending balance, and the change in cash in the respective columns. Step 2: Enter the titles of all the remaining accounts from the balance sheets on the worksheet and list each beginning and ending account balance, and the change in the account balance directly below the cash information. Worksheet Method Steps 1-3: Setting up the worksheet

46 46 Step 3: Directly below these accounts, add the following headings: A. Net Cash Flow From Operating Activities B. Cash Flows From Investing Activities C. Cash Flows From Financing Activities D. Investing and Financing Activities Not Affecting Cash ContinuedContinued Leave sufficient room below each heading. Worksheet Method Steps 1-3: Setting up the worksheet

47 47 Account for all the changes in the noncash accounts. Reconstruct the journal entries that caused the changes in the noncash accounts directly on the worksheet. Use these general rules: (A) Start with net income. (B) Account for the changes in the current assets (except cash) and current liability accounts. (C) Account for the changes in the noncurrent accounts. ContinuedContinued Worksheet Method Step 4: Completion of the worksheet

48 48 Make a final worksheet entry to record the net change in cash. The difference between the total cash inflows and outflows must be equal to the change in the Cash account. Prepare the statement of cash flows and the accompanying schedule from the information developed on the worksheet. Worksheet Method Step 5: Record the net change in cash Step 6: Prepare the final worksheet entry

49 49 Worksheet

50 50 Worksheet

51 51 Analyzing Complex Transactions First, let’s reconstruct the original entry. During the year the company sold land that cost $2,200 for $3,900. Worksheet Method

52 52 Analyzing Complex Transactions Cash3,900 Land2,200 Gain on Sale of Land1,700 Cash Flows From Investing Activities: Proceeds From Sale of Land3,900 Land2,200 Net Cash Flow From Operating Activities: Gain1,700 Now, we can analyze the entry to help us with recording it on the worksheet. Worksheet Method

53 53 This is a tougher one. Analyzing Complex Transactions During the year, an earthquake (extraordinary event) occurred that destroyed a building owned by the company with a cost of $10,000 and a book value of $5,200. The company received after-tax proceeds of $3,100 from its insurance company. Worksheet Method

54 54 Analyzing Complex Transactions Cash3,100 Accumulated Depreciation: Buildings4,800 Extraordinary loss2,100 Buildings10,000 Cash Flows From Investing Activities: Proceeds From Building Destroyed by Earthquake3,100 Accumulated Depreciation: Buildings4,800 Net Cash Flow From Operating Activ.2,100 Buildings10,000 Now, we can reconstruct the entry. Worksheet Method

55 55 Analyzing Complex Transactions On January 1, the company issued bonds payable with a face value of $10,000, receiving proceeds of $9,000. The company amortized $100 of the discount during the year. Let’s reconstruct both entries related to the bond issue and prepare them for the worksheet. Worksheet Method

56 56 Analyzing Complex Transactions Cash9,000 Discount on Bonds Payable1,000 Bonds Payable, 10%10,000 Cash Flows From Financing Activities: Proceeds From Issuance of Bonds9,000 Discount on Bonds Payable1,000 Bonds Payable, 10%10,000 ContinuedContinued Worksheet Method

57 57 Analyzing Complex Transactions Bond Discount Amortization100 Discount on Bonds Payable100 Cash Flows From Operating Activities: Bond Discount Amortization100 Discount on Bonds Payable100 Worksheet Method

58 58 A company sold equipment with a cost of $2,200 and accumulated depreciation of $700 for $2,100. Analyzing Complex Transactions Here is another situation that was not part of the chapter’s comprehensive problem. Special Topics

59 59 Analyzing Complex Transactions Cash2,100 Accumulated Depreciation 700 Equipment2,200 Gain on Sale of Equipment600 Cash Flows From Investing Activities: Proceeds From Sale of Equipment2,100 Accumulated Depreciation700 Equipment2,200 Net Cash Flow From Operating Activities: Gain on Sale of Equip.600 Now reconstruct the entry. Special Topics

60 60 A company acquired land for $10,000 by paying $1,000 down and signing a $9,000 note payable. Partial Cash Investing and Financing Activities

61 61 Land10,000 Cash1,000 Notes Payable9,000 Land10,000 Cash Used For Investing Activities: Purchased Land1,000 Note Payable9,000 Reconstruct the entry for the worksheet. Make the worksheet entry in journal entry format. Partial Cash Investing and Financing Activities

62 62 Schedule of Noncash Transactions The purchase of the land is shown as a $9,000 investing activity… …and the issuing of the note is shown as a $9,000 financing activity. Partial Cash Investing and Financing Activities

63 63 A company acquired land for $18,000 by paying $15,000 down and signing a $3,000 note payable. Cash Flows From Investing Activities Purchase of land by issuance of note and cash$(18,000) Less: Issuance of note 3,000 Cash payment for purchase of land$15,000 Cash Flows From Investing Activities Purchase of land by issuance of note and cash$(18,000) Less: Issuance of note 3,000 Cash payment for purchase of land$15,000 Partial Cash Investing and Financing Activities

64 64 Land10,000 Cash1,000 Notes Payable9,000 Land10,000 Cash Used For Investing Activities: Purchased Land1,000 Notes Payable9,000 Reconstruct the entry for the worksheet. Make the worksheet entry in journal entry format. Partial Cash Investing and Financing Activities

65 65 On November 28, 2007, Dougherty Company purchased 1,000 shares of Bear Company common stock for $40,000 as a temporary investment in available-for-sale securities. On December 31, 2007, the fair value of the stock was $42 per share. (1) Reconstruct the two entries related to this investment. (2) Make the worksheet entry in journal format. (1) Reconstruct the two entries related to this investment. (2) Make the worksheet entry in journal format. Temporary and Long-Term Investments

66 66 Temporary Investment in Available-for- Sale Securities40,000 Cash40,000 Temporary Investment in Available-for Sale Securities40,000 Cash Flows From Investing Activities: Payment for Purchase of Temporary Investment40,000 ContinuedContinued (1) (2) Temporary and Long-Term Investments

67 67 Allowance for Change in Value of Investment2,000 Unrealized Increase in Value of Available-for-Sale Securities2,000 Allowance for Change in Value of Investment2,000 Unrealized Increase in Value of Available-for-Sale Securities2,000 No change! The debit portion appears only in the upper portion of the worksheet. (1) (2) Temporary and Long-Term Investments

68 68 On January 16, 2008, Dougherty Company sold its investment in Bear Company stock for $45,000. Cash45,000 Temporary Investment in Available-for-Sale Securities40,000 Gain on Sale of Temporary Invest.5,000 Unrealized Increase in Value of Available-for-Sale Securities2,000 Allowance for Change in Value of Investment2,000 Temporary and Long-Term Investments

69 69 Cash Flows From Investing Activities: Proceeds From Sale of Temporary Investment45,000 Temporary Investment in Available-for-Sale Securities40,000 Net Cash Flow From Operating Activities: Gain on Sale of Temporary Investment5,000 The second entry is unchanged. Temporary and Long-Term Investments

70 70 C hapter 22 Task Force Image Gallery clip art included in this electronic presentation is used with the permission of NVTech Inc.


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