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7-1 Chapter 7 Skyline College. 7-2 The three types of business operations are: A service business is a business that sells services. A merchandising business.

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Presentation on theme: "7-1 Chapter 7 Skyline College. 7-2 The three types of business operations are: A service business is a business that sells services. A merchandising business."— Presentation transcript:

1 7-1 Chapter 7 Skyline College

2 7-2 The three types of business operations are: A service business is a business that sells services. A merchandising business is a business that sells goods purchased for resale. A manufacturing business is a business that sells goods that it has produced.

3 7-3 Meet The Style Shop The Style Shop is a retail business that sells the latest fashion clothing. A retail business sells directly to individual customers. The Style Shop must account for the purchases and sales of goods and for Merchandise inventory. Merchandise inventory is the stock of goods a merchandising business keeps on hand to sell

4 7-4 Special Journals and Subsidiary Ledgers Allow for efficient recording of financial data, the accounting systems of most businesses include special journals and subsidiary ledgers A special journal is a journal used to record only one type of transaction. A subsidiary ledger is a ledger dedicated to accounts of a single type.

5 7-5 Journal Flow Chart Does the transaction involve cash? YES Was cash RECEIVED? YES NO Record the transaction in the CASH RECEIPTS (CRs) Journal Use the CRs and CDs Journals to prepare the monthly Bank Reconcilation Record the transaction in the CASH DISBURSEMENTS (CDs) Journal NO Was inventory PURCHASED? YES NO Record the purchase in the PURCHASES Journal (PJ) Was it a credit SALE? YESNO Record the Transaction in the SALES Journal (SJ) Record the Transaction In the GENERAL Journal (GJ)

6 7-6 Journals Used by Merchandising Businesses Sales Purchases Cash receipts Cash payments General To record sales of merchandise on credit To record purchases of merchandise on credit To record cash received from all sources Type of JournalPurpose To record all disbursements of cash To record all transactions that are not recorded in another special journal and all adjusting and closing entries

7 7-7 Ledgers Used by Merchandising Businesses General Accounts receivable Accounts payable Assets, liabilities, owner’s equity, revenue, and expense accounts Accounts for credit customers Accounts for creditors Type of Ledger Content

8 7-8 ASSETS 101 Cash 105 Petty Cash Fund 109 Notes Receivable 111 Accounts Receivable 112 Allowance for Doubtful Accounts 116 Interest Receivable 121 Merchandise Inventory 126 Prepaid Insurance 127 Prepaid Interest 129 Supplies 131 Store Equipment 132 Accumulated Depreciation - Store Equip. 141 Office Equipment 142 Accumulated Depreciation - Office Equip. LIABILITIES 201 Notes Payable — Trade 202 Notes Payable — Bank 205 Accounts Payable 216 Interest Payable 221 Social Security Tax Payable 222 Medicare Tax Payable 223 Employee Income Tax Payable 225 Federal Unemployment Tax Payable 227 State Unemployment Tax Payable 229 Salaries Payable 231 Sales Tax Payable OWNER’S EQUITY 301 Mary Amos, Capital 302 Mary Amos, Drawing 399 Income Summary REVENUE 401 Sales 451 Sales Returns and Allowances 491 Interest Income 493 Miscellaneous Income The Style Shop Chart of Accounts COST OF GOODS SOLD 501 Purchases 502 Freight In 503 Purchases Returns and Allowances 504 Purchases Discounts EXPENSES 611 Salaries Expense - Sales 612 Supplies Expense 614 Advertising Expense 617 Cash Short or Over 626 Depreciation Expense - Store Equipment 634 Rent Expense 637 Salaries Expense - Office 639 Insurance Expense 641 Payroll Taxes Expense 643 Utilities Expense 649 Telephone Expense 651 Uncollectible Accounts Expense 657 Bank Fees Expense 658 Delivery Expense 659 Depreciation Expense - Office Equipment 691 Interest Expense 693 Miscellaneous Expense

9 7-9 A sales journal is a special journal used to record sales of merchandise on credit. Sales on account only! The Sales Journal

10 Four credit sales made on January 3, 8, 11, and 15 require four separate entries in the general journal: Four debits to Accounts Receivable Four credits to Sales Tax Payable Four credits to Sales Four descriptions General Journal and General Ledger

11 Accounts Receivable Sales Tax Payable Sales Sold merchandise on credit to Barbara Coe, Sales Slip Accounts Receivable Sales Tax Payable Sales Sold merchandise on credit to Amalia Rodriguez, Sales Slip Accounts Receivable Sales Tax Payable Sales Sold merchandise on credit to Cathy Ball, Sales Slip Accounts Receivable Sales Tax Payable Sales Sold merchandise on credit to Roy Anderson, Sales Slip 1101 Jan. 3 CREDIT DEBITPOST. REF. DESCRIPTIONDate 20-- GENERAL JOURNAL PAGE 2

12 The four credit sales require twelve postings to the general ledger: Four postings to Accounts Receivable Four postings to Sales Tax Payable Four postings to Sales General Journal and General Ledger YIKES!

13 A special journal intended only for credit sales provides a more efficient method of recording these transactions. Recording Transactions in a Sales Journal In a sales journal, only one line is needed to record all information for each transaction. This helps avoid repetition.

14 7-14 Sales Slip The Style Shop Roy Anderson 8913 South Hampton Road Dallas, TX Total 432 S Harris

15 7-15 The Style Shop 2007 Trendsetter Lane Dallas, TX Roy Anderson 8913 South Hampton Road Dallas, TX Sales Tax Total 432 S Harris SALES JOURNAL PAGE 1 SALES ACCOUNTS SALES TAX DATE SLIP CUSTOMER’S NAME POST. RECEIVABLE PAYABLE SALES NO. REF. DEBIT CREDIT CREDIT 20-- Jan Roy Anderson 

16 7-16 SALES JOURNAL PAGE 1 SALES ACCOUNTS SALES TAX DATE SLIP CUSTOMER’S NAME POST. RECEIVABLE PAYABLE SALES NO. REF. DEBIT CREDIT CREDIT 20-- Jan Roy Anderson  Cathy Ball  Barbara Coe  Amalia Rodriguez  Fred Wu  Linda Carter  Kim Ramirez  Mesia Davis  1, , Alma Sanchez  Roy Anderson  Totals 5, ,450

17 With a sales journal it is not necessary to post each credit sale individually to general ledger accounts. Instead, summary postings are made at the end of the month after the amount columns of the sales journal are totaled. Posting from a Sales Journal

18 Before any posting takes place, the equality of the debits and credits recorded in the sales journal is proved by comparing the column totals. DR=CR

19 7-19 SALES JOURNAL PAGE 1 SALES ACCOUNTS SALES TAX DATE SLIP CUSTOMER’S NAME POST. RECEIVABLE PAYABLE SALES NO. REF. DEBIT CREDIT CREDIT 20-- Jan Roy Anderson Cathy Ball Barbara Coe Amalia Rodriguez Fred Wu Linda Carter Kim Ramirez Mesia Davis Alma Sanchez Roy Anderson Totals 5, ,450 (111)(401) ACCOUNT Sales ACCOUNT NO. 401 DATE DESCRIPTION POST. DEBIT CREDIT BALANCE REF. DEBIT CREDIT 20-- Jan. 31 S1 5,450 5,450 (231)

20 7-20 Advantages of a Sales Journal Saves time, effort, and recording space Makes journalizing and posting more efficient Requires only three summary postings to the general ledger at the end of each month Allows division of work Improves the audit trail

21 7-21 An accounts receivable ledger is a subsidiary ledger that contains credit customer accounts. The Accounts Receivable Ledger Makes it possible to verify that customers are paying their balances on time and that they are within their credit limits Provides a convenient way to answer questions from customers regarding their current balances or about a possible billing error

22 7-22 The Accounts Receivable Ledger NAME Roy Anderson ADDRESS 8913 South Hampton, Dallas, Texas DATE DESCRIPTION POST. DEBIT CREDIT BALANCE REF Jan. 1 Balance  432 The accounts receivable ledger has three money columns. The BALANCE column is presumed to contain debit amounts. 3 Sales Slip 1101 S

23 Each credit sale recorded in the sales journal is posted to the appropriate customer’s account in the accounts receivable ledger. Postings to the accounts receivable ledger are usually made daily so that the customer accounts can be kept up to date at all times. Posting a Credit Sale

24 7-24 SALES JOURNAL PAGE 1 SALES ACCOUNTS SALES TAX DATE SLIP CUSTOMER’S POST. RECEIVABLE PAYABLE SALES NO. ACCOUNT DEBITED REF. DEBIT CREDIT CREDIT 20-- Jan Roy Anderson  NAME Roy Anderson ADDRESS 8913 South Hampton, Dallas, Texas DATE DESCRIPTION POST. DEBIT CREDIT BALANCE REF Jan. 1 Balance  Sales Slip 1101 S

25 A sale is entered in the accounting records when the goods are sold or the service is provided. If something is wrong with the goods or service, the firm may take a sales return, or give a sales allowance.

26 7-26 A sales return is a firm’s acceptance of a return of goods from a customer. Sales Returns and Allowances A sales allowance is a reduction in the price originally charged to customers for goods or services.

27 7-27 When a return or allowance is related to a credit sale, the normal practice is to issue a credit memorandum. Credit Memorandum A credit memorandum is a note verifying that a customer’s account is being reduced by the amount of a sales return or sales allowance plus any tax that may have been involved.

28 7-28 Sales Returns and Allowances Returns and Allowances + A debit to the Sales Returns and Allowances account is preferred to making a direct debit to Sales. The Sales Returns and Allowances account is a contra revenue account.

29 7-29 Business Transaction On January 23 The Style Shop issued Credit Memorandum 101 for a sales allowance to Fred Wu for merchandise purchased on account. The merchandise was damaged but still usable. The Style Shop NAME: Fred Wu ADDRESS: 2007 Trendsetter Lane Dallas, TX PHONE:

30 7-30 Sales Returns and Allowances Accounts Receivable Sales Tax Payable Sales Allowance - + +

31 7-31 How does a sales allowance transaction affect the financial statements? QUESTION: Net income is decreased. Assets, liabilities, and equity are decreased. ANSWER:

32 Each sales return or allowance must be posted from the journal to the: General Ledger A/R and customer’s account in the subsidiary A/R ledger. Posting a Sales Return or Allowance

33 7-33 Date 20-- DESCRIPTIONPOST. REF. DEBIT CREDIT Jan. 25 Sales Returns and Allowances Sales Tax Payable Accounts Rec./Linda Carter Accepted a return of defective merchandise, Credit Memorandum 102; original sale made on Sales Slip 1106 of January /  NAME Linda Carter ADDRESS 1819 Belt Line Road, Dallas, TX DATE DESCRIPTION POST. DEBIT CREDIT BALANCE REF Jan. 1 Balance  Sales Slip 1106 S CM 102 J indicates that the amount was posted to the Accounts Receivable account in the general ledger. The check mark indicates that the amount was posted to the customer’s account. Posting from the General Journal

34 7-34 Net sales is the difference between the balance in the Sales account and the balance in the Sales Returns and Allowances account and the Sales Discounts account. Reporting Net Sales

35 7-35 Sales Less Sales Returns and Allowances Net Sales The Style Shop calculation for net sales Month Ended January 31, 20-- $25,700 $25,100 Note: there are no sales discounts in this problem

36 The use of an accounts receivable ledger does not eliminate the need for the Accounts Receivable account in the general ledger. However, the general ledger balance for A/R is now considered a control account because it is the summary of all the subsidiary A/R accounts. Schedule of Accounts Receivable

37 7-37 At the end of each month, after all the postings have been made, the balances in the accounts receivable ledger must be proved against the balance of the Accounts Receivable general ledger account. TOTAL OF INDIVIDUAL CUSTOMER BALANCES ACCOUNTS RECEIVABLE BALANCE =

38 The names of all customers with account balances are listed with the amount of their unpaid balances. Schedule of Accounts Receivable A schedule of accounts receivable is a listing of all balances of the accounts in the accounts receivable subsidiary ledger.

39 7-39 The Style Shop Schedule of Accounts Receivable January 31, 20-- Roy Anderson Cathy Ball Linda Carter Barbara Coe Mesia Davis Kim Ramirez Amalia Rodriguez Alma Sanchez Fred Wu Total ACCOUNT Accounts Receivable Account No. 111 DATE DESCRIPTION POST. DEBIT CREDIT BALANCE REF. DEBIT CREDIT Jan. 1 Balance  J J S CR A comparison of the total of the schedule of accounts receivable and the balance of the Accounts Receivable account shows that the two figures are the same.

40 7-40 A wholesale business is a manufacturer or distributor of goods that sells to retail businesses or large consumers. Credit Sales for a Wholesale Business The basic procedures used by wholesalers to handle sales and accounts receivable are the same as those used by retailers except no sales tax and many wholesalers offer cash and trade discounts

41 7-41 A trade discount is a reduction from the list price. Net Price The list price is the established retail price. The net price is the list price less all trade discounts.

42 7-42 List Price Trade Discounts Net Price – = Formula for Net Price

43 7-43 The same goods may be offered to different customers at different trade discounts. A single trade discount A series of trade discounts Trade discounts can be offered as

44 7-44 Suppose the list price of goods is $1,500 and the trade discount is 40 percent. List Price $ 600 $1,500 x 40% List price x trade discount Single Trade Discount Discount

45 7-45 List price $ 900 $1,500 trade discount Single Trade Discount Suppose the list price of goods is $1,500 and the trade discount is 40 percent. Net Price

46 7-46 Suppose the list price is $1,500 and the trade discount is quoted as a series of 25 and 15 percent. $1,500 first discount $1,500 x 25% =$375 Series of Trade Discounts $1,125 second discount $1,125 x 15% =$ $ Net price

47 7-47 Special journals such as the sales journal can vary in format from company to company. Using a Sales Journal for a Wholesale Business No sales tax for a Wholesale Business

48 7-48 Sales taxes apply only to retail transactions. A wholesale business does not need to account for sales taxes. The sales journal has a single amount column. SALES JOURNAL PAGE 1 ACCOUNTS DATE INVOICE CUSTOMER’S POST. RECEIVABLE DR. NO. ACCOUNT DEBITED REF. SALES CR Jan Gabbert’s Hardware Company  18, Neal’s Department Store  4, Total 40,875 (111/401)

49 7-49 SALES JOURNAL PAGE 1 ACCOUNTS DATE INVOICE CUSTOMER’S POST. RECEIVABLE DR. NO. ACCOUNT DEBITED REF. SALES CR Jan Gabbert’s Hardware Company  18, Neal’s Department Store  4, Total 40,875 (111/401) DATE DESCRIPTION POST. DEBIT CREDIT BALANCE REF. DEBIT CREDIT 20-- Jan. 1 Balance 46, S1 40,875 87,575 ACCOUNT Accounts Receivable ACCOUNT NO. 111 DATE DESCRIPTION POST. DEBIT CREDIT BALANCE REF. DEBIT CREDIT 20-- Jan. 31 S1 40,875 40,875 ACCOUNT Sales ACCOUNT NO. 401 Posting from a Single-Column Journal

50 7-50 An invoice is a customer billing for merchandise bought on credit. Invoice

51 7-51 Sales on Credit Each business must develop credit policies that achieve maximum sales with minimum losses: A credit policy that is too tight results in a low level of losses at the expense of increases in sales volume. A credit policy that is too lenient may result in increased sales volume accompanied by a high level of losses.

52 7-52 A Cost of Doing Business Even though the credit investigation is thorough, some accounts receivable become uncollectible. Unexpected business developments, errors of judgment, incorrect financial data, and many other causes may lead to defaults in payments by customers.

53 7-53 Different Types of Credit Sales Open-account credit Most commonly offered by small businesses granted on the basis of personal knowledge of the customer Business credit cards department store chains and gasoline companies, provide their own credit cards Cards issued by credit card companies

54 7-54 Bank Credit Cards Retailers can provide credit while minimizing or avoiding the risk of losses from uncollectible accounts by accepting bank credit cards. The most widely accepted bank credit cards are MasterCard and Visa. Bank credit cards are issued to consumers directly by banks.


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