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STARTER 1 1. What stories do you think followed these headlines? A. Web phone scam The scheme to make money illegally using Web phones CANKAYA UNIVERSITY.

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Presentation on theme: "STARTER 1 1. What stories do you think followed these headlines? A. Web phone scam The scheme to make money illegally using Web phones CANKAYA UNIVERSITY."— Presentation transcript:

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2 STARTER 1 1. What stories do you think followed these headlines? A. Web phone scam The scheme to make money illegally using Web phones CANKAYA UNIVERSITY - OFFICE OF BASIC AND ELECTIVE COURSES- ENGLISH UNIT

3 B. Love bug created worldwide chaos “A sample from a newspaper More than 20 countries affected "Love-Bug" virus damage estimated at $10 billion By Mike Ingram It is estimated that the so-called "Love-Bug" virus has caused some $10 billion losses in as many as 20 countries. The virus was originally distributed in an with the subject line “I love you". The message contains the text "kindly check the attached LOVELETTER from me" and an attached file called LOVE-LETTER FOR- YOU.TXT.VBS. If this attachment is opened it will replicate itself and be transferred to all addresses within a user's address book. The virus also deletes graphic files ending with the letters jpg or jpeg, and alters music files ending in mp3 to make them inaccessible.” CANKAYA UNIVERSITY - OFFICE OF BASIC AND ELECTIVE COURSES- ENGLISH UNIT

4 C. Hackers crack Microsoft software codes “A sample from a newspaper Special report: the future of Microsoft Net news Duncan CampbellDuncan Campbell in Los Angeles The GuardianThe Guardian, Saturday 28 October BST Hackers have broken into Microsoft's computer network and gained access to blueprints of its latest software, the company admitted yesterday. Initial investigations suggest that the hackers could have links with, or be based in, St Petersburg, Russia. Microsoft, already embroiled in a legal battle with the US government, said it is working with the FBI and law enforcement authorities to trace the source of "a deplorable act of computer espionage". Steve Ballmer, the chief executive, confirmed that hackers gained access to the source codes - which include the software for products such as the Windows operating system - but insisted they had not tampered with them. “ CANKAYA UNIVERSITY - OFFICE OF BASIC AND ELECTIVE COURSES- ENGLISH UNIT

5 What other types of computer crime are there ? Spreading Viruses Distributing viruses that can reproduce themselves and are written with the purpose of causing damage Hacking Gaining unauthorised access to a network system Salami Shaving Manipulating programs or data so that small amounts of money are deducted from a large number of transactions. The victims are unaware of the crime as the amount taken from any individual is so small. Trojan Horse A technique that involves adding concealed intructions to a computer program so that it will still work but will also perform prohibited actions Piggybacking Using another person’s identification code or using that person’s files before he or she has logged off. Phishing: tricking a user into revealing confidential information Software piracy: unauthorised copying of a programme for sale Defacing: changing the information shown on another person’s webpage Hijacking: redirecting anyone trying to visit a certain site elsewhere..... CANKAYA UNIVERSITY - OFFICE OF BASIC AND ELECTIVE COURSES- ENGLISH UNIT

6 VOCABULARY Patch (v): To insert programming code into a computer program to fix or modify it Host Computer (n. phr): A computer containing data or programs that another computer can access by means of a network or modem. Host computer system Infected program (adj. phr): A computer program which contains virus. If you want to know if a program is infected or not, you should use virus scan. CANKAYA UNIVERSITY - OFFICE OF BASIC AND ELECTIVE COURSES- ENGLISH UNIT

7 Stay resident (v): to stay permanently in somewhere Not all of the computer viruses can stay resident in your computer, you can delete them with virus scan programs. Remain Dormant (v): to stay inactive Some viruses in the computer remain dormant until the computer is switched on. Trigger Event (adj. phr): an event which initiates an action If you press on this switch off button, it will be a trigger event for computer and it will stop working

8 Reading 3 1. To transfer program control to the virus 2. The Misdirection, Reproduction, trigger and payload routines 3. It returns control to the program as originally written

9 Reading 5 1. They produce inside a host which they damage or destroy 2. It can copy itself into any program files 3. They can stay dormant in the memory until triggered 4. Displaying a message on the monitor screen or deleting files on the hard disk 5. COM or EXE programs 6. C-b-d-a 7. A trojan has payload but no reproduction routine

10 Problem Solving 1. F 2. H 3. C 4. A 5. E 6. G 7. B 8. D 9. J 10. ı

11 SPECIALIST READING VOCABULARY Transaction (n): the exchange of money, information, goods services etc. between two parties. The transaction of money via the internet is not secure enough as hackers can get your money during transactions. Tamper (v): to interfere in a harmful way The director realized that somebody tampered with the document as there were some changes in the numbers. CANKAYA UNIVERSITY - OFFICE OF BASIC AND ELECTIVE COURSES- ENGLISH UNIT

12 Impostor (n): somebody who uses fake identity to trick people He introduced himself as the manager of the institution, but later we realized that he was an impostor: he was actually the driver of the real manager. User authentication (n. phr): A security measure to identify individuals and verify them to receive money or specific data. Nowadays most of the banks use user authentication like e-signature or passwords that is messaged to their phones

13 Decrypt = Decipher(v): to decode a message or data into normal language In order to read the message, first you need to decrypt these signs Tamper-proof (adj. phr.): having enough security to protect from a harmful interference The website of this bank is tamper-proof, that’s nobody can interfere with the money transactions. Gibberish (n): a meaningless and nonsense language These sentences are gibberish, I can’t understand a word of it. Alter (v): to change It was an altered message, they changed every word of it so as to make it nonsense. CANKAYA UNIVERSITY - OFFICE OF BASIC AND ELECTIVE COURSES- ENGLISH UNIT

14 Authenticate (v): to show that something is real, not false or copied. The experts authenticated the document found in the library. Issuer (n): a legal institution that develops, registers and sells securities for the purpose of financing its operations. Legitimate (adj): allowed by the law, or correct according to the law. Our business is totally legitimate, it is done according to the law of the country. Tenet (n): the basic principle or rule The basic tenets of Democracy CANKAYA UNIVERSITY - OFFICE OF BASIC AND ELECTIVE COURSES- ENGLISH UNIT

15 KEY-Specialist Reading 1. A 2. C 3. Public key cryptography 4. Decrypt 5. B 6. İnformation about the company operating the server and the server’s public key Page 131 a) İv b) İii c) İ d) ii CANKAYA UNIVERSITY - OFFICE OF BASIC AND ELECTIVE COURSES- ENGLISH UNIT

16 B-2 (page 131) B-3 ( page 129) a) İii b) İv c) Vi d) İ e) İi f) v a) F b) T c) F d) F e) F f) F g) T h) T B-4 (page 129) C D B A

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