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Created by Melissa Kienbaum 5/2012: All rights reserved. Denial The Oedipus Rex Final:

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1 Created by Melissa Kienbaum 5/2012: All rights reserved. Denial The Oedipus Rex Final:

2 Created by Melissa Kienbaum 5/2012: All rights reserved. Read and take notes on EVERY slide IN ORDER. Answer the questions posed in your notebook. Then complete the assignment given on slides See Ms. K. if you’re unclear about anything presented here!

3 Created by Melissa Kienbaum 5/2012: All rights reserved. Our friend Oedipus spent his life denying his destiny and trying to run from it. This denial is what some say lead to his horrific downfall. One major theme in Sophocles’ s classic play is that if Oedipus had only accepted the truth about himself, his life wouldn’t have ended so tragically. Do you agree? Can you identify which of Oedipus’s actions were caused by denial and an attempt to escape the truth?

4 Created by Melissa Kienbaum 5/2012: All rights reserved. For your section final, you’ll explore this concept of denial and acceptance - in literature, in others, and in yourself. Again, carefully read each slide in this PowerPoint and carefully follow the instructions. Take notes as you read, answering questions when prompted. These are your essential questions: o What is denial? o How and why do we use denial? o What are the effects of denial on us and others? o What is the alternative to denial? o What are the effects of acceptance? Let’s begin by defining denial...

5 Created by Melissa Kienbaum 5/2012: All rights reserved. “Denial ain’t just a river in Egypt!” -Mark Twain

6 Created by Melissa Kienbaum 5/2012: All rights reserved. Denial is a defense mechanism used when a person is faced with a fact that is too uncomfortable to accept. The person rejects the situation, insisting it is not true, even when faced with strong evidence that says otherwise.

7 Created by Melissa Kienbaum 5/2012: All rights reserved.

8 Types of Denial Denial of fact Someone who is in denial of fact is typically using lies to avoid facts they think may be painful to themselves or others. This lying can take the form of an outright falsehood (commission), leaving out certain details to tailor a story (omission). Denial of responsibility This form of denial involves avoiding personal responsibility by blaming others, justifying their actions, or minimizing the impact of their actions. Someone using denial of responsibility is usually attempting to avoid potential harm or pain by shifting attention away from themselves. Denial of impact Denial of impact involves a person's avoiding thinking about or understanding the harms of his or her behavior has caused to self or others. Doing this enables that person to avoid feeling a sense of guilt and it can prevent him or her from feeling remorse or empathy for others.

9 Created by Melissa Kienbaum 5/2012: All rights reserved. Types of Denial cont. Denial of awareness People using this type of denial will avoid pain and harm by stating they were in a different state of awareness (such as alcohol or drug intoxication or on occasion mental health related). Denial of cycle Many who use this type of denial will say things such as, "it just happened.” Denial of cycle is where a person avoids looking at their decisions leading up to an event or does not consider their pattern of decision making and how harmful behavior is repeated. DARVO DARVO is otherwise known as victim blaming. It is an acronym to describe a common strategy of abusers: Deny the abuse, Attack the victim for attempting to make them accountable for their offense, thereby Reversing Victim and Offender.

10 Created by Melissa Kienbaum 5/2012: All rights reserved. Artist’s interpretation Denial by E. Gibbons Oil On Canvas What is your initial reaction to this painting? What is the artist’s message?

11 Created by Melissa Kienbaum 5/2012: All rights reserved. Musician’s interpretation I Shall Believe By Sheryl Crow Music and Lyrics Music and Lyrics For You and Your Denial By Yellowcard Music and Lyrics Music and Lyrics Do you know any other songs about denial? Tell Ms. K.!

12 Created by Melissa Kienbaum 5/2012: All rights reserved. Read the first half of the Mayo Clinc article “Denial: When it helps, when it hurts.” It explains the reasons people use denial. “Denial: When it helps, when it hurts.”“Denial: When it helps, when it hurts.” Have you or a loved one experienced any of these circumstances? Think of at least one example.

13 Created by Melissa Kienbaum 5/2012: All rights reserved. Now read the second half of the article. It explains when denial is helpful, as well as when it is harmful. the articlethe article Have you or a loved one experienced these helpful or harmful situations? Consider how this affected the person in denial and those around him or her.

14 Created by Melissa Kienbaum 5/2012: All rights reserved. So what does this have to do with Oedipus again? Well Oedipus used denial as a defense mechanism to protect him from the truth of his existence. Read one blogger’s interesting view on this here. here Do you agree that Oedipus’s denial ultimately lead to his doom? How? If you were in his shoes, would you have reacted similarly? How does his denial affect those around him? What might he have done instead?

15 Created by Melissa Kienbaum 5/2012: All rights reserved. Consider this:  Do you see denial as being harmful or helpful?  Are there things in your life that you don’t want to accept?  Have you used denial to protect yourself?  Are you in denial about anything now?

16 Created by Melissa Kienbaum 5/2012: All rights reserved. The alternative to denial is accepting the truth.

17 Created by Melissa Kienbaum 5/2012: All rights reserved. Acceptance is a person’s assent to the reality of a situation. Acceptance can be difficult, but it is often much less damaging than denial.

18 Created by Melissa Kienbaum 5/2012: All rights reserved. “What you resist, persists.” – Carl Jung Many argue that the only way to overcome adversity is to embrace it. Continuing to resist something that is troubling you will enable you to trouble you longer. How has something troubled you or a loved one for longer than necessary because it was resisted or denied?

19 Created by Melissa Kienbaum 5/2012: All rights reserved. Artist’s interpretation Unzip the Truth By Jacob Hammond Digital Art What is your initial reaction to this painting? What is the artist’s message?

20 Created by Melissa Kienbaum 5/2012: All rights reserved. Musician’s interpretation This Time By Pia Toscano MusicMusic and Lyrics Lyrics MusicLyrics The Truth By Limp Bizkit Music and Lyrics Music and Lyrics Broken Strings By James Morrison MusicMusic and Lyrics Lyrics MusicLyrics Truth Hurts, but Denial Kills By C-Hoop MusicMusic and Lyrics Music

21 Created by Melissa Kienbaum 5/2012: All rights reserved. “The truth will set you free.” -John 8:32, The Bible (New International Version)

22 Created by Melissa Kienbaum 5/2012: All rights reserved. Read the Huffington Post article “The Power of Acceptance.” “The Power of Acceptance.”“The Power of Acceptance.” How can acceptance be powerful? Follow the author’s instructions in his “Action: What You Can Do” paragraphs. Write your list in your notebook.

23 Created by Melissa Kienbaum 5/2012: All rights reserved. Consider this:  What truths in your life have been/are difficult to accept?  Have you accepted the truth about who you are and the conditions of your life?  Are you a person who confronts reality head on or do you find ways to run from the circumstances of your life?

24 Created by Melissa Kienbaum 5/2012: All rights reserved. Your assignment is to write and record a short podcast persuading the listener to agree with your perspective on denial and acceptance. podcast Choose one of the following statements, and create an argument supporting it.  Because it keeps us from the truth and impedes positive change, denial is damaging.  Denial is a valuable coping mechanism.  Fear often keeps us from accepting certain truths about ourselves; this lack of acceptance is harmful.  Accepting the truth about ourselves, our loved ones, and circumstances of life is difficult. There are some things we will never be able to accept.  Accepting the truth about ourselves, our loved ones, and circumstances of life is the only path to happiness.

25 Created by Melissa Kienbaum 5/2012: All rights reserved. Parameters:  You must use evidence from the reading you’ve done in this section. For instance, you might draw parallels to how Oedipus’ denial lead to his downfall, or you might tie your ideas to Mike Robbins’ views on the power of acceptance.  You must also give examples from your life experience. Specific examples are always better than general examples.  Your writing should be between one and two typed pages in length.  Remember to adhere to organizational principles of good composition: Begin with an introduction that gets the audience interested. Begin with an introduction that gets the audience interested. Organize your body in a logical order and use transitions. Organize your body in a logical order and use transitions. End with a conclusion that gives resolution and restates your point. End with a conclusion that gives resolution and restates your point.  Because you’re trying to persuade, you should use elements of rhetoric: ethos, pathos, and logos.

26 Created by Melissa Kienbaum 5/2012: All rights reserved. Procedure: 1. Choose a prompt from the list. 2. Write a draft of your response, making sure to follow the given parameters. 3. Have Ms. K. edit your draft. 4. Revise your draft. 5. Record yourself reading your final response aloud to create your podcast. (If you need to borrow an audio recorder from Ms. K., just ask!)

27 Created by Melissa Kienbaum 5/2012: All rights reserved. Excellent!Good.OK, but could be better.Not acceptable.Total Content 9 points6 points3 points0 points Clever introduction has a hook that engages the listener immediately. Intro enthusiastically identifies the speaker and establishes a purpose. An attempt is made to engage the audience from the outset. The podcast is engaging as the intro progresses. The speaker is introduced directly. Somewhat engaging, provides an inferred purpose. Alludes to who is speaking. Minimally engages listener. Does not include an introduction or the purpose is vague and unclear. Fails to identify speaker. Uses multiple specific examples from the reading in a relevant manner that enhances the speaker’s argument. Uses at least one specific example from the reading in a relevant manner that enhances the speaker’s argument. Uses minimal examples from the reading or uses examples that do not support or enhance the argument. Uses no specific examples from reading in this section. Uses multiple specific examples from the speaker’s life in a relevant manner to enhance the speaker’s argument. Uses at least one specific example from the speaker’s life in a relevant manner that enhances the speaker’s argument. Uses minimal examples from the speaker’s life or uses examples that do not support or enhance the argument. Uses no specific examples from the speaker’s life. Vocabulary is mature, developed and enhances content. Grammar is correct. Vocabulary is appropriate and grammar is correct. Vocabulary is adequate. Occasionally incorrect grammar is used during the podcast. Vocabulary is inappropriate for the audience. Grammar is poor. Conclusion clearly summarizes key information and directs the audience to action. Conclusion summarizes information, clarifying argument. Conclusion vaguely summarizes the argument. No conclusion is provided. Content is well organized, with mature transitions that make the argument flow. Stays focused. Content is organized and transitions are apparent. Stays on topic. Content organization is weak but the argument is apparent. Occasionally strays from topic. Organization and focus are weak and therefore distracts from the argument.

28 Created by Melissa Kienbaum 5/2012: All rights reserved. Persuasion Employs all elements of rhetoric (ethos, pathos, logos) in a way that enhances persuasion. Employs some elements of rhetoric in a way that enhances persuasion. Employs some elements of rhetoric in a way that minimally enhances persuasion. Does not use rhetoric. Podcast takes a strong stance and is highly effective in persuading the audience and calling them to act. Podcast takes a stance and is effective in persuading the audience. Podcast lacks a clear stance or is ineffective in persuading the audience. Podcast has no stance and/or is not persuasive. Delivery 6 points4 points2 points0 points Well rehearsed, smooth delivery in a conversational style. Rehearsed, smooth delivery. Appears unrehearsed with uneven delivery. Delivery is hesitant and choppy and sounds like the presenter is reading. Highly effective enunciation, expression, and rhythm keep the audience listening. Enunciation, expression, pacing are effective. Enunciation, expression, rhythm are sometimes distracting. Enunciation is not clearly understandable or expression and rhythm are distracting. Volume enhances the presentation. Volume is acceptable. Volume is occasionally inconsistent. Volume issues distract from the argument. Podcast length keeps the audience interested and engaged. Podcast length keeps audience listening. Podcast length is somewhat long or somewhat short to keep audience engaged. Podcast is either too long or too short to keep the audience engaged. 4 points2 points0 points Podcast was completed ahead of the deadline Podcast was completed on time.Podcast was late. Excellent!Good.OK, but could be better.Not acceptable.Total 9 points6 points3 points0 points Total: /100

29 Created by Melissa Kienbaum 5/2012: All rights reserved. Slide 1: Slide 3: mTpcbJ4i_bw/Tw_jK2mLaiI/AAAAAAAAAHk/byQsTyiQumY/s1600/Oedipus_Rex.jpg mTpcbJ4i_bw/Tw_jK2mLaiI/AAAAAAAAAHk/byQsTyiQumY/s1600/Oedipus_Rex.jpghttp://4.bp.blogspot.com/- mTpcbJ4i_bw/Tw_jK2mLaiI/AAAAAAAAAHk/byQsTyiQumY/s1600/Oedipus_Rex.jpg Slide 5: Slide 7: Slide 10: Slide 16: Slide 17: Slide 19: 766x1024.jpg 766x1024.jpghttp://www.pickthebrain.com/blog/wp-content/uploads/2010/04/Unzip_the_Truth_by_ChubbaART2- 766x1024.jpg Slide 20: Slide 20: Slide 21: Slide 22: Slide 8 & 9: Columbia Encyclopedia (2003) via Slide 12 & 13: Slide 14: Slide 22: Slide 11: Sheryl Crow “I Shall Believe” Music and lyrics: Slide 11: Yellowcard “For You and Your Denial” Music and lyrics: Slide 20: Pia Toscano “This Time”: Music and lyrics: Slide 20: Limp Bizkit “The Truth”: Music and lyrics: Slide 20: James Morrison “Broken Strings”: Music and lyrics: Slide 20: C-Hoop “Truth Hurts, but Denial Kills”: Music: Images Text Music


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