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Minerals. EQ: What are minerals? Standard: S6E5b. Investigate the contribution of minerals to rock composition.

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Presentation on theme: "Minerals. EQ: What are minerals? Standard: S6E5b. Investigate the contribution of minerals to rock composition."— Presentation transcript:

1 Minerals

2 EQ: What are minerals? Standard: S6E5b. Investigate the contribution of minerals to rock composition.

3 There are five characteristics of a mineral

4 Five characteristics of a mineral: Solid—A mineral is always a solid, with a definite volume and shape.

5 Five characteristics of a mineral: Solid—A mineral is always a solid, with a definite volume and shape. Inorganic—A mineral cannot form from materials that were once part of a living thing. Inorganic means “not living”.

6 Five characteristics of a mineral: Solid—A mineral is always a solid, with a definite volume and shape. Inorganic—A mineral cannot form from materials that were once part of a living thing. Inorganic means “not living”. Naturally Occurring—A mineral is formed by processes in the natural world.

7 Five characteristics of a mineral: Solid—A mineral is always a solid, with a definite volume and shape. Inorganic—A mineral cannot form from materials that were once part of a living thing. Inorganic means “not living”. Naturally Occurring—A mineral is formed by processes in the natural world. Crystal Structure—The particles of a mineral line up in repeating patterns, called crystals, with faces that meet up at sharp edges and corners.

8 Five characteristics of a mineral: Solid—A mineral is always a solid, with a definite volume and shape. Inorganic—A mineral cannot form from materials that were once part of a living thing. Inorganic means “not living”. Naturally Occurring—A mineral is formed by processes in the natural world. Crystal Structure—The particles of a mineral line up in repeating patterns, called crystals, with faces that meet up at sharp edges and corners. Definite Chemical Composition—A mineral always contains certain elements in definite proportions.

9 Five characteristics of a mineral:

10 EQ: How can I identify a mineral? Standard: S6E5b. Investigate the contribution of minerals to rock composition.

11 Properties of a mineral: Color

12 Properties of a mineral: Color Streak—the color of a mineral’s powder. A streak test can help to identify a mineral. Streak and color are often different.

13 Properties of a mineral: Color Streak—the color of a mineral’s powder. A streak test can help to identify a mineral. Streak and color are often different. Luster--how light is reflected from a mineral’s surface. Examples include metallic, glassy, silky, dull, waxy, earthy.

14 Properties of a mineral: Color Streak—the color of a mineral’s powder. A streak test can help to identify a mineral. Streak and color are often different. Luster--how light is reflected from a mineral’s surface. Examples include metallic, glassy, silky, dull, waxy, earthy. Density—how compact a substance; mass per unit volume.

15 Properties of a mineral: Color Streak—the color of a mineral’s powder. Luster--how light is reflected from a mineral’s surface. Density—how compact a substance; mass per unit volume. Hardness—the ability of a mineral to scratch another mineral. Mohs hardness scale ranks ten minerals from softest to hardest. Talc can be scratched by a fingernail; diamond can scratch all other substances.

16 Properties of a mineral: Crystal Systems—six basic groups based on crystal faces; often only visible under a microscope. Groups include cubic, hexagonal, tetragonal, orthorhombic, monoclinic, and triclinic. Hardness—the ability of a mineral to scratch another mineral. Mohs hardness scale ranks ten minerals from softest to hardest. Talc can be scratched by a fingernail; diamond can scratch all other substances.

17 Properties of a mineral: Crystal Systems—six basic groups based on crystal faces; often only visible under a microscope. Groups include cubic, hexagonal, tetragonal, orthorhombic, monoclinic, and triclinic. Cleavage—when a mineral splits easily along flat surfaces. Examples—prismatic, cubic, octahedral Hardness—the ability of a mineral to scratch another mineral. Mohs hardness scale ranks ten minerals.

18 Properties of a mineral: Crystal Systems—six basic groups based on crystal faces; often only visible under a microscope. Groups include cubic, hexagonal, tetragonal, orthorhombic, monoclinic, and triclinic. Cleavage—when a mineral splits easily along flat surfaces. Examples—prismatic, cubic, octahedral Fracture—how a mineral looks when it breaks apart in an irregular way. Examples—splintery, uneven, hackly

19 Properties of a mineral: Crystal Systems—six basic groups based on crystal faces Cleavage—when a mineral splits easily along flat surfaces. Examples— prismatic, cubic, octahedral Fracture—how a mineral looks when it breaks apart in an irregular way. Examples—splintery, uneven, hackly Tenacity—the resistance of mineral particles to being separated. Examples—brittle, malleable, elastic

20 Properties of a mineral: Crystal Systems—six basic groups based on crystal faces Cleavage—when a mineral splits easily along flat surfaces Fracture—how a mineral looks when it breaks apart in an irregular way Tenacity—the resistance of mineral particles to being separated. Examples—brittle, malleable, elastic Special Properties—unique properties not shared by all minerals, such as magnetism, fluorescence, radioactivity, reactivity


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