Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

University of Oxford Centre for the Analysis of South African Social Policy What can Social Science Contribute to Neighbourhood renewal? Indices of Multiple.

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "University of Oxford Centre for the Analysis of South African Social Policy What can Social Science Contribute to Neighbourhood renewal? Indices of Multiple."— Presentation transcript:

1 University of Oxford Centre for the Analysis of South African Social Policy What can Social Science Contribute to Neighbourhood renewal? Indices of Multiple Deprivation for South Africa Professor Michael Noble University of Oxford Centre for the Analysis of South African Social Policy (CASASP)

2 University of Oxford Centre for the Analysis of South African Social Policy The Role of Indices of Multiple Deprivation in Neighbourhood Renewal  Policies for Neighbourhood Renewal have as a pre- requisite that areas in need of re-generation need to be rigorously identified  At Oxford we’ve developed Indices for England (x2 – 3 rd underway), Scotland (x1), Wales (x1), Northern Ireland (x2)  In South Africa – Urban Development Programme; Integrated Rural Development Programme identified by informed opinion not evidence  Provincial Indices of Multiple Deprivation launched March 2006

3 University of Oxford Centre for the Analysis of South African Social Policy Collaborators  Statistics South Africa  Human Sciences Research Council

4 University of Oxford Centre for the Analysis of South African Social Policy Outline  The model of multiple deprivation  Brief description of the PIMD and component domains  Domain and indicator issues  Brief description of the methodology  Findings  Next Steps

5 University of Oxford Centre for the Analysis of South African Social Policy Model of Multiple Deprivation  Deprivation is multi-dimensional and multiple deprivation can be conceptualised as the combination of individual dimensions or domains of deprivation.  The individual domains must be identified and carefully defined.  Indicators are selected for each domain which are the best possible direct measures of that dimension of deprivation.  The indicators are combined to create an overall relative measure of that dimension of deprivation.

6 University of Oxford Centre for the Analysis of South African Social Policy Data Source  2001 Census  Code developed on 10% SAR  Code passed to Stats SA who ran it on 100% Census  Run at ward level

7 University of Oxford Centre for the Analysis of South African Social Policy The Domains  Income and Material deprivation  Employment deprivation  Health deprivation  Education deprivation  Living Environment deprivation

8 University of Oxford Centre for the Analysis of South African Social Policy The Income/Material Deprivation Domain This domain aims to capture the proportions of the population experiencing income/material deprivation in an area.  Numerator = Number of people experiencing one or more of the following:  Living in a household that has a household equivalent income below R10,189 pa (R850 per month);  Living in a household without a refrigerator;  Living in a household with neither a TV nor a radio.  Denominator = Total population (excluding institutions)

9 University of Oxford Centre for the Analysis of South African Social Policy The Employment Domain This domain measures employment deprivation conceptualised as involuntary exclusion of the working age population from the world of work  Numerator = Number of people who are:  Unemployed (using official definition i.e. did not work in 7 days prior to Census night, wanted to work and available to start within a week, had taken active steps to find work or start some form of self-employment in previous 4 weeks); plus  Not working because of illness or disability  Denominator = Total economically active population (15-65 year olds incl.) + people not working because of illness or disability

10 University of Oxford Centre for the Analysis of South African Social Policy The Health Domain This domain identifies areas with relatively high rates of people who die prematurely  Years of Potential Life Lost

11 University of Oxford Centre for the Analysis of South African Social Policy The Education Domain The purpose of the domain is to capture the extent of deprivation in education qualifications in a local area  Numerator = Number of year olds (inclusive) experiencing the following:  No schooling at secondary level or above  Denominator = Number of year olds (inclusive) excluding institutions.

12 University of Oxford Centre for the Analysis of South African Social Policy The Living Environment The purpose of this domain is to identify deprivation relating to the poor quality of the living environment.  Numerator = Number of people experiencing one or more of the following:  No access to a telephone;  No piped water inside their dwelling or in their yard;  No use of electricity for lighting;  Living in households that are shacks;  Living in households without a pit latrine with ventilation or flush toilet;  Living in households with two or more persons per room.  Denominator = Total population (excluding institutions)

13 University of Oxford Centre for the Analysis of South African Social Policy Methodology  Dealing with small numbers (shrinkage estimation in health domain)  Combining the indicators to create domain scores  Combining the domain scores into an Index of Multiple Deprivation

14 University of Oxford Centre for the Analysis of South African Social Policy Combining the domains into PIMD  Domain scores were standardised by ranking  The ranks were then transformed to an exponential distribution  Properties of the exponential  Spreads out the 25% most deprived wards  eliminates implicit weights and thus controls cancellation between domains

15 University of Oxford Centre for the Analysis of South African Social Policy Provincial Geography (2001 Census) Wards were deleted if they were situated in District Management Areas or if they had very small populations.

16 University of Oxford Centre for the Analysis of South African Social Policy

17 University of Oxford Centre for the Analysis of South African Social Policy

18 University of Oxford Centre for the Analysis of South African Social Policy

19 University of Oxford Centre for the Analysis of South African Social Policy

20 University of Oxford Centre for the Analysis of South African Social Policy

21 University of Oxford Centre for the Analysis of South African Social Policy

22 University of Oxford Centre for the Analysis of South African Social Policy

23 University of Oxford Centre for the Analysis of South African Social Policy

24 University of Oxford Centre for the Analysis of South African Social Policy

25 University of Oxford Centre for the Analysis of South African Social Policy Limitations of PIMD  Uneven Ward geography

26 University of Oxford Centre for the Analysis of South African Social Policy Variation in Ward Size

27 University of Oxford Centre for the Analysis of South African Social Policy Limitations of PIMD  Uneven Ward geography  Not up to date or updateable  Domains of deprivation limited by Census variables

28 University of Oxford Centre for the Analysis of South African Social Policy Next Steps  Undertake in depth Provincial Analyses e.g. as commissioned by Western Cape  Create a ‘statistical’ geography – Data Zones  Create a National Index  Update using 2007 Community Survey (Census Replacement Survey)  Move to administrative data where possible  Create a 1996 Index to monitor change


Download ppt "University of Oxford Centre for the Analysis of South African Social Policy What can Social Science Contribute to Neighbourhood renewal? Indices of Multiple."

Similar presentations


Ads by Google