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Institutional Capacity for Environmental Management: A Comparison of Two Canadian Biosphere Reserves Maureen G. Reed University of Saskatchewan for Canadian.

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Presentation on theme: "Institutional Capacity for Environmental Management: A Comparison of Two Canadian Biosphere Reserves Maureen G. Reed University of Saskatchewan for Canadian."— Presentation transcript:

1 Institutional Capacity for Environmental Management: A Comparison of Two Canadian Biosphere Reserves Maureen G. Reed University of Saskatchewan for Canadian Association of Geographers June 1, 2007 Maureen G. Reed University of Saskatchewan for Canadian Association of Geographers June 1, 2007

2 Purpose and Approach Purpose: to explore the roots and effects of uneven environmental management in two different regional contexts. Stage I: Uses managerial and political traditions to conceptualize regional environmental management regimes Stage 2: Environmental governance is conceptualized with attention to property exchange, re- territorialization, valuation, and planning Purpose: to explore the roots and effects of uneven environmental management in two different regional contexts. Stage I: Uses managerial and political traditions to conceptualize regional environmental management regimes Stage 2: Environmental governance is conceptualized with attention to property exchange, re- territorialization, valuation, and planning

3

4 Stage 1 Conceptualizing Environmental Management Regimes

5 Environmental Management Regimes

6 Assessing environmental management regimes in two Canadian biosphere reserves Redberry Lake BR Clayoquot Sound BR

7 Characteristics at Redberry Lake & Clayoquot Sound

8 Environmental Management Regimes Environmental Management Regimes Regional environments Regional environments Regional economies Regional economies Cultural change and continuity Cultural change and continuity Institutional capacity Institutional capacity Regional environments Regional environments Regional economies Regional economies Cultural change and continuity Cultural change and continuity Institutional capacity Institutional capacity

9 Stage II Conceptualizing Environmental Governance

10 Governance Privatization Enclosure Valuation Neoliberalization and Nature (after Heynen and Robbins 2005)

11 Property exchange privatization Re-territorialization enclosure Valuation valuation Planning governance Governance Governance: “ the conscious management of regime structures ” (Hyd é n, 1992: 7) through formal and informal institutional arrangements

12 Clayoquot Sound: A robust management regime Public lands and management responsibility New migrants who will support conservation Longstanding land use planning initiatives Direct involvement of Aboriginal people Large number of ENGOs in the region Several efforts to incorporate scientific and traditional knowledge Biosphere Trust established

13 Redberry Lake: private stewardship Dominance of private land Few public conservation instruments Fewer ENGOs No Aboriginal involvement

14 Opening the door to private stewardship in Redberry Lake

15 The biosphere reserve committee became excluded, in part, by its emphasis on funding over partnerships. Capacity building, in the form of establishing networks, appears to be a key component of success.

16 Comparison and Conclusion

17 ComparisonComparison Both Clayoquot Sound and Redberry Lake are characterized by dynamic governance arrangements. Both Clayoquot Sound and Redberry Lake are characterized by dynamic governance arrangements. At Clayoquot Sound, a dynamic, yet robust and publicly vetted, governance system has emerged. At Redberry Lake, processes of property exchange re- territorialization, remapping, valuation, and planning all take place in the absence of public debate. Both Clayoquot Sound and Redberry Lake are characterized by dynamic governance arrangements. Both Clayoquot Sound and Redberry Lake are characterized by dynamic governance arrangements. At Clayoquot Sound, a dynamic, yet robust and publicly vetted, governance system has emerged. At Redberry Lake, processes of property exchange re- territorialization, remapping, valuation, and planning all take place in the absence of public debate.

18 ConclusionConclusion Neoliberaliation of the conservation agenda brings out unusual adversaries and allies. Uneven conservation practices arise and require greater scrutiny of social relations embedded in community-based approaches to environmental management so as not to reinforce social inequalities. Neoliberaliation of the conservation agenda brings out unusual adversaries and allies. Uneven conservation practices arise and require greater scrutiny of social relations embedded in community-based approaches to environmental management so as not to reinforce social inequalities.

19 AcknowledgementsAcknowledgements Funding for this research was provided by the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council. Funding for this research was provided by the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council. I thank all research participants. I thank all research participants. Photographs were taken by Maureen Reed and Sharmalene Mendis-Millard. Photographs were taken by Maureen Reed and Sharmalene Mendis-Millard. The full paper can be found at: The full paper can be found at: Reed, M.G Uneven Environmental Management: A Canadian Comparative Political Ecology. Environment and Planning A, 39: Funding for this research was provided by the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council. Funding for this research was provided by the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council. I thank all research participants. I thank all research participants. Photographs were taken by Maureen Reed and Sharmalene Mendis-Millard. Photographs were taken by Maureen Reed and Sharmalene Mendis-Millard. The full paper can be found at: The full paper can be found at: Reed, M.G Uneven Environmental Management: A Canadian Comparative Political Ecology. Environment and Planning A, 39:


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