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Just Do It: Data Collection March 24, 2011 Shults Center Forum Student Development Divisional Assessment Team.

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Presentation on theme: "Just Do It: Data Collection March 24, 2011 Shults Center Forum Student Development Divisional Assessment Team."— Presentation transcript:

1 Just Do It: Data Collection March 24, 2011 Shults Center Forum Student Development Divisional Assessment Team

2 Agenda Part 1: Welcome Part 1: Welcome Part 2: Review of the assessment process Part 2: Review of the assessment process Part 3: Data collection and measurement tools Part 3: Data collection and measurement tools Part 4: Connecting to the Division Strategic Plan Part 4: Connecting to the Division Strategic Plan Part 5: Q & A Part 5: Q & A

3 Welcome Participants will be able to… Describe the differences between the following terms: qualitative, quantitative, direct, indirect and performance based/authentic. Identify the appropriate data collection method to assess their department’s student learning outcome. Make connections between their department’s student learning outcome and the Divisional Strategic Plan.

4 The Assessment Process: A Continuous Cycle 1.Establish Outcomes or Goals 3. Assess Student Learning and Development 2. Provide Learning and Development Opportunities 4. Use the Results Suskie, 2009, p.4

5 Data Collection What do you want to measure? What do you want to measure? What data do you need to collect to see if you are achieving your learning outcomes? What data do you need to collect to see if you are achieving your learning outcomes? Qualitative/Quantitative Qualitative/Quantitative How can you collect that data? How can you collect that data? Examples of tools and data sources: Examples of tools and data sources: Focus Groups Focus Groups Surveys/Questionnaires Surveys/Questionnaires Student work: bulletin boards, portfolios, resumes Student work: bulletin boards, portfolios, resumes

6 Definitions Quantitative – numerical data Quantitative – numerical data Qualitative – words, objects or pictures Qualitative – words, objects or pictures Direct – based on actual student work that demonstrates that learning has taken place Direct – based on actual student work that demonstrates that learning has taken place Indirect – based on a report of perceived student learning Indirect – based on a report of perceived student learning Performance based/authentic - systematic observation and rating that requires a person to demonstrate a specific skill and/or competencies Performance based/authentic - systematic observation and rating that requires a person to demonstrate a specific skill and/or competencies Rubric – a guide containing criteria arranged in levels indicating the degree to which a standard has been met Rubric – a guide containing criteria arranged in levels indicating the degree to which a standard has been met

7 QuantitativeQualitative Direct Measure Test scores Rubric scores for writing, oral presentations, performances Observations - field work, internships, service learning Student publications or conference presentations Indirect Measure Counts, such as # hours spent in activities Surveys Program evaluations Questionnaires Interviews Focus Groups Performance Based (Authentic) Rubric scores Portfolios Service projects Performances/creations Examples of Types of Data and Measurement

8 Example of a Rubric 321 Preparation Professional dress. Clear knowledge of career/job interests. Has well developed 30 second elevator pitch as way of introduction. Has professional business cards, if appropriate. Questionable dress (such as top shirt buttons undone, mismatched tops/bottoms, wearing backpack). General awareness of career/job interests. Has basic introduction (beyond name and major) prepared to share. Inappropriate dress (such as jeans, untucked shirts, clothes not ironed, skirts cut too high). Lack of knowledge of career/job interests. No introduction prepared beyond name and major. Brings parent, friend, significant other, child along. Approach Displays enthusiasm for speaking with Alumni even while waiting their turn by standing quietly, engaging in current conversation occurring when appropriate, and making eye contact with Alum if possible. Well developed approach, including smile, outstretched hand for handshake, and implementation of short elevator pitch. Cautiously approaches Alumni. Does not integrate self into current conversation. Handshake not fully developed, or overzealous. Introduces self with just name. Not acting professional while waiting to speak to Alumni (such as talking/texting on cell phone). Hesitation when making approach, or making self center of discussion immediately as they join. Weak (or absence of) handshake. Interaction Makes and maintains strong eye contact, and uses non-verbals to indicate interest and understanding. Engages in full interaction with Alumni, answering and asking questions in normal flow of conversation. Provides detailed examples to support answers to questions. Integrates multiple questions that show interest and seek to gain insight into knowledge Alum has to share. Makes eye contact, but does not maintain throughout conversation. May smile and nod to show interest. Uses filler words (such as "umm" or "like") while formulating answers or transitioning between topics. Exhibits some confidence by adding detail when answering questions. Has at least one question to ask of Alumni. Not maintaining eye contact with Alumni. Waiting for Alum to ask questions or guide conversation. Not fully answering questions posed to them. Lack of non-verbal communication. Bad posture (such as standing with arms crossed). Lack of emotion/not displaying interest. Closing Asks Alumni for business cards, and makes clear plan of follow up. Smiles as they shake Alum’s hand and thank them for their time. May or may not ask for business card. No clear plan of follow up made. Smiles as they thank Alumni. No parting handshake. Not thanking Alumni for time. No clear sign off or parting handshake. Turning to walk away while still talking/saying goodbye. Overall Highly CompetentCompetentNot Competent

9 Reflective Conversation Based on your SLO: What kind of data/evidence does your department need to collect? What kind of data/evidence does your department need to collect? How will this help you measure your outcome? How will this help you measure your outcome?

10 Data Collection Campus Safety Example: “ Students will learn the skills to effectively evaluate situations and make appropriate judgments regarding their own health and safety, and the health and safety of others.” Want to know if students will make a good decision based on a set of circumstances Want to know if students will make a good decision based on a set of circumstances Use a rubric to evaluate written descriptions of past incidences (qualitative, indirect) Use a rubric to evaluate written descriptions of past incidences (qualitative, indirect)

11 Data Collection Athletics Example: “Student athletes will exhibit good sportsmanship.” Want to know number of standard and ethical violations in a given academic year Want to know number of standard and ethical violations in a given academic year Review reports of game statistics Review reports of game statistics (quantitative, indirect)

12 Data Collection Child Care Center Example: “Student workers will demonstrate the skills necessary to provide care for PCCCC.” Want to know how well student workers demonstrate skills to care for children Want to know how well student workers demonstrate skills to care for children Use a rubric to measure performance of student workers (qualitative, performance based) Use a rubric to measure performance of student workers (qualitative, performance based)

13 Data Collection Student Activities Example: “Students will apply effective decision making skills in group settings.” Want to know to what degree students are applying effective decision making skills Want to know to what degree students are applying effective decision making skills During observation, use a rubric to determine degree of effectiveness (quantitative, direct) During observation, use a rubric to determine degree of effectiveness (quantitative, direct)

14 Reflective Conversation Based on the type of data/evidence you have identified: What appropriate tools can you use to collect your data/evidence? What appropriate tools can you use to collect your data/evidence?

15 Connecting to the Strategic Plan All departments will identify/have identified at least one specific learning outcome for their areas from the following 6 learning domains: All departments will identify/have identified at least one specific learning outcome for their areas from the following 6 learning domains: Knowledge Acquisition, Construction, Integration, and Application – understanding ideas from multiple disciplines, linking concepts and experiences, relating knowledge to daily life Knowledge Acquisition, Construction, Integration, and Application – understanding ideas from multiple disciplines, linking concepts and experiences, relating knowledge to daily life Cognitive Complexity – critical and/or reflective thinking, effective reasoning, creativity Cognitive Complexity – critical and/or reflective thinking, effective reasoning, creativity Intrapersonal Development – realistic self-appraisal, self- understanding, self-respect, identity development Intrapersonal Development – realistic self-appraisal, self- understanding, self-respect, identity development

16 All departments will identify/have identified at least one specific learning outcome for their areas from the following 6 learning domains: All departments will identify/have identified at least one specific learning outcome for their areas from the following 6 learning domains: Interpersonal Competence – initiate, maintain and manage positive social relationships Interpersonal Competence – initiate, maintain and manage positive social relationships Humanitarianism and Civic Engagement – recognition of self as a member of a larger social fabric; acquiring knowledge, skills, values and motivation to promote the quality of life in a community Humanitarianism and Civic Engagement – recognition of self as a member of a larger social fabric; acquiring knowledge, skills, values and motivation to promote the quality of life in a community Practical Competence – ability to translate theoretical knowledge, skills and abilities to real world applications Practical Competence – ability to translate theoretical knowledge, skills and abilities to real world applications Connecting to the Strategic Plan

17 Reflective Conversation Based on the 6 domains in the Divisional Strategic Plan: What domain(s) does your SLO connect to? What domain(s) does your SLO connect to?

18 Questions? Thank you for participating!

19 Resources Assessment terms and definitions [PDF document]. Retrieved from Council for the Advancement of Standards in Higher Education. (2009). CAS professional standards for higher education (7 th ed.). Washington, DC: Author. Direct and indirect measurement result [Word document]. Retrieved from =spsu.edu&sitesearch=spsu.edu&x=0&y=0 =spsu.edu&sitesearch=spsu.edu&x=0&y=0 Kelly, M. (n.d.). The definition of a rubric. Retrieved from Rubric (academic). (n.d.). Retrieved from Wikipedia: Schuh, J., & Upcraft, L. (2001). Assessment Practice in Student Affairs: An Applications Manual. San Francisco, CA: Jossey Bass. Suskie, L. (2009). Assessing student learning: A common sense guide. (2 nd ed.). San Francisco, CA: Jossey Bass.


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