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Chapter Eleven Developing a Professional Presence.

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1 Chapter Eleven Developing a Professional Presence

2 Copyright © Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved Chapter Preview: Developing a Professional Presence Importance of professional presence Favorable first impressions The image you project to others Choice of clothing for work Manners and interpersonal relations at work

3 Copyright © Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved Professional Presence A dynamic blend of –Poise –Self-confidence –Control –Style

4 Copyright © Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved Professional Presence Empowers us to be able to command respect in any situation Permits us to project confidence that others can quickly perceive Permits us to rise above the crowd

5 Copyright © Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved Professional Presence Can’t be superficial Requires principles including: –Service (making a contribution) –Integrity and honesty (foundation of trust) –Human dignity (every person has worth) –Fairness (justice for all)

6 Copyright © Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved Making a Good Impression A positive first impression during a job interview, business or social contact: –is a lasting impression –is the first step to building a long-term relationship –helps you gain professional benefits –helps you achieve your fullest potential in your career choice

7 Copyright © Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved The Primacy Effect The tendency to form impressions quickly at the time of initial meeting First impressions establish a mental framework Later information is either ignored or reinterpreted based on initial framework

8 Copyright © Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved The First Few Seconds People begin forming an option within seconds A person may feel – threatened, offended, or bored –comfortable, safe, or interested Difficult to reverse first opinion

9 Copyright © Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved Assumptions Versus Facts Initial impressions are made up of assumptions and facts Often reliance on assumptions based on nonverbal communication The briefer the encounter, the greater the chance for misinformation

10 Copyright © Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved Total Person Insight Books are judged by their covers, houses are appraised by their curb appeal, and people are initially evaluated on how they choose to dress and behave. In a perfect world this is not fair, moral, or just. What’s inside should count a great deal more. And eventually it usually does, but not right away. In the meantime, a lot of opportunities can be lost. Susan Bixler and Nancy Nix-Rice Authors, The New Professional Image

11 Copyright © Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved Cultural Influence Stereotypes of entire groups can be formed during early years May lead to established impressions before we meet a new person Cultural differences can be subtle

12 Copyright © Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved Cultural Influence Organizations today –Attempt to create a new kind of workplace where cultural and ethnic differences are treated as assets –Find it more difficult to develop policies that do not offend one ethnic group or another Many employees still feel pressure to conform to the mainstream

13 Copyright © Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved The Image You Project Image describes how other people feel about you Behaviors that communicate a mental picture that others observe and remember –The picture determines how they react to you

14 Copyright © Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved The Image You Project A tool to reveal –inherent qualities –competence –attitude –leadership potential Like a picture puzzle that is formed by a variety of factors

15 Copyright © Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved Figure 11.1 Major Factors That Form Your Image

16 Copyright © Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved Surface Language A pattern of immediate impressions conveyed by appearance –Clothing –Hairstyle –Fragrance –Jewelry Often influences assumptions

17 Copyright © Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved Surface Language People judge appearance before they judge your talents Clothing is particularly important

18 Copyright © Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved Surface Language More relaxed dress code in recent years Things that have not changed –If you want the job, look the part –If you want the promotion, look promotable –If you want respect, dress as well or better than industry standards

19 Copyright © Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved Selecting Career Apparel Special uniforms for particular jobs Project an image of –consistent quality –good service –uniqueness Uniforms can enhance company cohesiveness and add to company spirit

20 Copyright © Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved Career Apparel Special-design uniforms –Airline clerks –Restaurant employees Other typical career apparel –Blue or grey business suit by female lawyer or male banker –Matching shirt and pants for technician

21 Copyright © Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved Wardrobe Engineering Describes how clothing and accessories can create a certain image Effective packaging is an individual matter based on the person’s –circumstances –age –weight –height –coloring –objectives

22 Copyright © Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved Wardrobe Engineering A few factors to consider… Products and services offered Type of person served Desired image projected by the organization Geographic region

23 Copyright © Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved The Business Casual Look Movement toward emphasis on greater comfort and individuality Bridges the gap between more formal clothing and traditional play or casual clothes

24 Copyright © Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved The Business Casual Look The casual look was inspired by efforts to improve teamwork Bottom-up initiatives often emphasize getting rid of symbols of top-down authority Younger workers are more relaxed and looking for new ways to express individuality

25 Copyright © Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved The Business Casual Look Slacks Khaki pants Collared shirts or blouses Shoes with socks Jeans T-shirts Shorts Sneakers Sandals Usually includesUsually excludes

26 Copyright © Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved Typical Casual-Dress Guidelines Wear dressier business clothing when meeting with customers or clients Respect the boundary between work and leisure clothing Wear clothing that is clean and neat and that fits well

27 Copyright © Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved Your Facial Expression After overall appearance, most visible part of you Clues by which others read mood and personality Clue to identify the inner feelings of another

28 Copyright © Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved Your Facial Expression Strongly influence people’s reactions to each other Triggers positive or negative reactions Smile is most recognizable signal in the world People tend to trust a smiling face

29 Copyright © Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved Your Entrance and Carriage The way you enter an office or business meeting can influence the image you project If you feel apprehensive, try not to let it show Set the stage for the meeting

30 Copyright © Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved Your Entrance and Carriage Hold your head up Don’t slump Project self-confidence with –a strong stride –a friendly smile –good posture –a genuine sense of energy

31 Copyright © Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved Your Voice Qualities that contribute to meaning attached to verbal messages –Tone of voice –Rate of speech (tempo) –Volume –Ability to pronounce (diction) Particularly important on the phone

32 Copyright © Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved Your Voice Your voice should reflect four qualities. –Confidence –Enthusiasm –Optimism –Sincerity

33 Copyright © Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved Your Voice Avoid… –Dull and colorless speech –Talking to fast or slow –Monotone –Mumbling –Strong accent

34 Copyright © Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved Your Voice Cultural and racial differences are sometimes detectable in our voices and dialects The best rule is to be yourself; communicate well and be understood

35 Copyright © Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved Your Handshake A friendly and professional way to greet someone Can communicate warmth or indifference Might be the only physical contact between people

36 Copyright © Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved Your Handshake The message the handshake sends depends on several factors –Degree of firmness –Degree of dryness of hands –Duration of grip –Depth of interlock –Eye contact during handshake

37 Copyright © Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved Your Handshake A firm handshake communicates a caring attitude; a weak grip communicates indifference A moist palm can communicate nervousness and is likely to repel most people

38 Copyright © Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved Your Handshake Extending the duration can often communicate a greater degree of interest A full, deep grip is likely to communicate friendship and strength to the other person Making and maintaining eye contact can increase the positive impact

39 Copyright © Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved Etiquette for a Changing World Etiquette is a set of traditions based on kindness, efficiency and logic –Manners or protocol Universal passport to positive relationships and respect Avoid behavior that might be offensive

40 Copyright © Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved Dining Etiquette Business often conducted at meals Pay attention to table manners Order food that isn’t messy

41 Copyright © Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved Meeting Etiquette Start and end on time, and on a positive note Speak to the topic Don’t speak unnecessarily Summarize and recap responsibilities

42 Copyright © Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved Cell Phone Etiquette Do not use at business meetings, in elevators, or in restaurants Take in a normal speaking voice Ask cell users who disturb to take the call in private

43 Copyright © Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved Conversational Etiquette Don’t be too informal, too fast Avoid foul language Avoid other sensitive terms or expressions

44 Copyright © Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved Networking Etiquette Tell your name and what you do Avoid negative talk Follow up with contacts

45 Copyright © Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved Total Person Insight In a society as ridden as ours with expensive status symbols, where every purchase is considered a social statement, there is no easier or cheaper way to distinguish oneself than by the practice of gentle manners. Judith Martin Author

46 Copyright © Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved Incivility—The Ultimate Career Killer Civility is the sum of the many sacrifices we are called to make for the sake of living together Civility is under siege in our society –increase in coarse, rude, and obnoxious behavior Unfortunately, some of the most outrageous behavior has been rewarded with wealth and influence

47 Copyright © Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved Incivility—The Ultimate Career Killer Small gestures can improve civility and enhance your career, e.g. –Saying "Please" and "Thank you" –Opening doors for others –Treating coworkers with dignity and respect

48 Copyright © Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved Professional Presence and Job Interview Communicate the image that you are someone that is conscientious Be prepared –Visit the place of business beforehand –Observe the people already working there –Dress up one step in terms of professional appearance

49 Copyright © Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved Summary Professional presence permits us to be perceived as self-assured and competent –Perceived the first time someone meets us People form impressions quickly Impressions tend to last

50 Copyright © Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved Summary First impressions are made up of –Assumptions –Facts Assumptions are based on –cultural influences –surface language Discrimination based on appearance still exists

51 Copyright © Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved Summary Four factors tend to influence choice of clothing for work: –Services offered –Type of customer –Desired image –Region where you work

52 Copyright © Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved Summary Image is projected by –facial expressions –your entrance –your handshake –voice –manners and etiquette Consider all factors before an interview or situation to make a positive first impression


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