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California Energy Commission North American Market Gas-trade (NAMGas) Model: Key Drivers and Structure 2015 Integrated Energy Policy Report California.

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Presentation on theme: "California Energy Commission North American Market Gas-trade (NAMGas) Model: Key Drivers and Structure 2015 Integrated Energy Policy Report California."— Presentation transcript:

1 California Energy Commission North American Market Gas-trade (NAMGas) Model: Key Drivers and Structure 2015 Integrated Energy Policy Report California Energy Commission February 26, 2015 Leon D. Brathwaite Supply Analysis Office Energy Assessment Division

2 California Energy Commission Purpose 2 Key elements of the natural gas model –North American Market Gas-trade (NAMGas) model Integrated Energy Policy Report (IEPR) Common Cases

3 California Energy Commission North American Market Gas-trade Model NAMGas Model created in the MarketBuilder platform In the IEPR 2013, started with the World Gas Trade Model (WGTM) and completed the following: –Reconfigured the California portion of the model to suit the Energy Commission needs –Removed all non-North American structure –Added functional nodes to account for Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG) imports and exports –Added nodes needed to represent natural gas demand in the transportation sector Staff to maintain a similar structure for the IEPR

4 California Energy Commission North American Market Gas-trade (NAMGas) Model 4 Simplified View: Produces estimates of supply, demand, and hub prices Generates end-use burner-tip prices from hub prices Natural gas supply basins Connected to Interstate and Intrastate Pipelines Connected to Demand centers

5 California Energy Commission Key Drivers: Supply Basins Resource assessments: –Assessments of technically recoverable resources Most important factor affecting regional trade flows and price –In general, price path in any long-term model should be most affected by the quantity of resources that are technically available Resource costs: –Costs of developing resources in various regions in North America define the subset of technically recoverable resources that is economically recoverable Change as price increases –Regional trade flows reflect the fact Production generally occurs from the lower-cost resources first –Technology innovations forces per-unit cost lower 5

6 California Energy Commission Supply Cost Curve Shifting 6 Marginal cost profile is a major input parameter for the natural gas model: − Technology is shifting the marginal cost profile − Overall, the shifting of the marginal cost supply profile results in more resources available at lower cost Sources: California Energy Commission; Baker Institute; National Petroleum Council

7 California Energy Commission Key Drivers: Demand Centers Demand in Five Disaggregated Sectors: –Residential  Key factors: recent historical demand for natural gas, population, natural gas price, income, heating oil price, and cold weather –Commercial:  Key factors: recent historical demand for natural gas, income, natural gas price, population, heating oil price, and cold weather –Industrial:  Key factors: recent historical demand for natural gas, natural gas price, coal price, industrial production, and cold weather 7

8 California Energy Commission Key Drivers: Demand Centers (cont’d) Demand in Five Disaggregated Sectors (cont’d) : –Power Generation:  Key factors: total electricity generation, weather, natural gas price, fuel oil price, renewable electricity generation, and coal price –Transportation:  Key Factors: recent historical demand for natural gas, income, natural gas price, and population  Applied outside California Estimated Elasticity: –Residential, Commercial, Industrial, Power Gen, and Transportation –Range of elasticity ~ –

9 California Energy Commission IEPR Common Cases 9 Staff constructed the following outlooks: –Mid Energy Demand Case Reference Case –Low Energy Demand Case –High Energy Demand Case

10 California Energy Commission IEPR Common Cases: Mid Energy Demand Case 10 Initial (starting) demand quantity (United States): –2012: Total ~ 22.1 Tcf; Power Gen ~ 7.7 Tcf –2020: Total ~ 26.9 Tcf; Power Gen ~ 9.9 Tcf –2030: Total ~ 26.2 Tcf; Power Gen ~ 10.6 Tcf Coal Conversion: 30 Gigawatts (beginning in 2014) Renewable Portfolio Standard: –California meets on time –5-year delay in other states

11 California Energy Commission IEPR Common Cases: Mid Energy Demand Case (cont’d) 11 Proved Reserves: approx. 360 Tcf Potential Reserves: –Approx $5.00/Mcf –Approx $10.00/Mcf Rate of Return: –Resources: 12.2% (real) –Pipeline Investment: 8.4% (real) –Income Tax Rate: 35% –Return on Equity: 8% Backstop Technology: –Unspecified at $9.00/Mcf Technology Factor: –1%/year

12 California Energy Commission IEPR Common Cases: Low Energy Demand Case 12 Converted 80 GW of coal-fired generation Assumed robust economic performance, with long-term annual economic growth capped at about 3.5% Delayed RPS implementation by 10 years as states grapple with budgetary concerns except California Starting in 2016, assumed robust LNG export capability developed and utilized at: –Four facilities already licensed Shrink resource base by approximately 7.5% –Uncertainty in development of some resources Scenario built in a sustained high cost environment

13 California Energy Commission IEPR Common Cases: High Energy Demand Case 13 Converted 1 Gigawatt of coal-fired generation Assumed all states meet RPS targets on time Capped long-term annual economic growth – About 2.0%, portending weak gross domestic product growth Disallowed LNG exports, thus keeping North America isolated Assumed technology develops at a rate of 2.5% Assumed larger resource base −Increased assessment size in the US and Canadian shale formations −Used upper range of published data −Resulted in additional 8.5% rightward shift of overall supply cost curve Scenario built in a sustained low cost environment

14 California Energy Commission Hub Prices to End-use Burner-tip Prices 14 Developing burner-tip prices –Extract hub prices from NAMGas model For example, PG&E hub, Malin hub, Socal Hub, and others –Develop transportation cost for natural gas flowing from hub to powerplant Use tariff sheets –Sum the two to get the burner-tip end-use prices

15 California Energy Commission IEPR Common Cases: Conclusions 15 Questions and Comments


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