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Canyon Ecology Crystal Springs feeds the Reed Lake and emerges as Crystal Springs Creek on the western side of campus, where it flows to join Johnson Creek.

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Presentation on theme: "Canyon Ecology Crystal Springs feeds the Reed Lake and emerges as Crystal Springs Creek on the western side of campus, where it flows to join Johnson Creek."— Presentation transcript:

1 Canyon Ecology Crystal Springs feeds the Reed Lake and emerges as Crystal Springs Creek on the western side of campus, where it flows to join Johnson Creek and out to the Pacific Ocean through the Columbia and Willamette Rivers. Because our creek is one of the last remaining creeks in east Portland flowing freely from source to ocean, it is considered a critical habitat for native endangered fish species like Coho and Chinook salmon and steelhead trout. The Canyon is characterized by Willamette Valley species like Doug fir trees, snowberry bushes, Mallard ducks and others. It has four distinct regions; the Crystal Springs Canyon, Upper Lake, Middle Lake and Lower Lake Management Zones. These Management Zones are marked on the Reed Canyon map Below and their distinct ecological features are discussed in detail in four brochures at the Reed Information Kiosk. Canyon Restoration When our restoration project began in 1999, the Reed Canyon was full of invasive nonnative plants. For example, English ivy had carpeted parts of the Canyon from floor to canopy, choking out native plants from understory to majestic tree canopy. Initial efforts focused on the removal of these invasives. After their containment, we turned our attention to native revegetation. Concurrent with these efforts, we were able to remove Reed’s concrete pool and build an extensive network of trails. Large efforts have also been made to improve water flow in the Canyon and streambed habitat for fish. To this end, Reed College has been able to expand stream meanderings into the newly renovated Rivelli farm property. This extension, part of a City of Portland effort to improve source-to-ocean connectivity, enables fish to access rearing habitat in Reed Lake.

2 Reed Canyon’s Many Uses The Reed Canyon serves the wider Portland community by offering a wonderful place for walks, runs, dog walks (on leashes!), bird watching, photography, sketching, picnics, strolls, chess or just interaction with a beautiful view of our placid lake. For the Reed College community, the Canyon serves as a special opportunity for education and field research. Everyone who has take a Biology course has used the Canyon as a lab, and many seniors have produced theses on Canyon ecology. Students gain hands-on experience in restoration as Canyon Crew employees. Getting Involved You can help in restoring the Reed Canyon by attending the bi-annual Canyon Day celebration in October and April. Organized by Reed College, this even provides the opportunity for community members young and old to assist in the restoration efforts by focusing on protection and restoration of the native plant community. Participants help by controlling invasive species and planting native vegetation in their place. Your work will be rewarded by live music, food and new friends. Inaugerated in 1921, Canyon Day is the longest standing tradition at Reed College. For Further information about the Reed College Canyon or to get involved in upcoming Canyon Days, visit the Reed Canyon website:


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