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PROVEN AND PROMISING CLIMATE MEASURES FROM U.S. COMMUNITIES

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Presentation on theme: "PROVEN AND PROMISING CLIMATE MEASURES FROM U.S. COMMUNITIES"— Presentation transcript:

1 PROVEN AND PROMISING CLIMATE MEASURES FROM U.S. COMMUNITIES By Stacey Meinzen & Ann Hancock Report issued: August

2 2 Stacey Meinzen Researcher Center for Climate Protection Ann Hancock Executive Director Center for Climate Protection

3 SONOMA COUNTY COMMUNITY CLIMATE ACTION PLANS Issued Oct Now Underway 3

4 Michael Boswell, Ph.D., City & Regional Planning, Cal. Polytechnic State University San Luis Obispo Dave Erickson, California Public Utilities Commission Lois Fisher, Fisher Town Designs Justin Gerdes, Forbes Contributor Alex Hinds, Sonoma State University J.R. Killigrew, Cities for Climate Protection - ICLEI Rick Pruetz, Planning & Implementation Strategies Bruce Riordan, Elmwood Consulting Andrew Seth, Climate Communities Abby Young, Bay Area Air Quality Management District Sonoma County Transportation and Land Use Coalition George Beeler, Business Operations Committee, Sonoma Clean Power 4 ADVISORS

5 APPROACH Identify top communities Survey top communities using online survey Follow-up with phone interviews Compile information, draft and vet findings and recommendations Issue final report 5

6 CHALLENGES Most U.S. communities currently do not aspire to reduce their GHG emissions and therefore do not track them. Of the few communities that do aspire to reduce emissions and track progress, only a few are actually achieving significant emission reductions. Of these communities, a handful knows with certainty the causes of their reductions. 6

7 1.Ann Arbor 2.Atlanta 3.Austin 4.Arcata 5.Benicia 6.Berkeley 7.Boston 8.Boulder 9.Chicago 10.Chula Vista 11.Davis 12.Fort Collins 13.Los Angeles 14.Marin County 15.Miami 16.Minneapolis 17.Montgomery County 18.New York City 19.Oakland 20.Oberlin 21.Palo Alto 22.Pasadena 23.Philadelphia 24.Portland Metro Council 25.San Jose 26.San Luis Obispo 27.San Rafael 28.San Francisco 29.Seattle 30.Snohomish County 31.Vancouver, Canada 32.Washington, D.C. TOP COMMUNITIES 7

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9 CommunityGHG reduction, time span Population Oberlin, Ohio50% ,300 New York City, New York16% ,336,697 San Francisco, California14.5% ,442 Minneapolis, Minnesota14% ,880 Snohomish Co., Washington13.4% ,913 Washington, D.C.12% ,449 Berkeley, California8% ,403 Gainesville, Florida7% ,047 Portland, Oregon6% ,106 LEADING U.S. COMMUNITIES AND THEIR GHG EMISSION REDUCTIONS 9

10 FINDINGS Renewable Energy: By far the most powerful measure under local control for significantly reducing greenhouse gas emissions is switching from fossil to renewable fuel sources for electricity generation. Energy Efficiency: Because more than 30 percent of Sonoma County greenhouse gas emissions are associated with energy use in buildings, measures to increase building energy efficiency remain an important, cost-effective strategy. Further research of best practices is needed to identify effective programs to make buildings far more efficient than they are today. Transportation and Land Use: Local solutions for reducing greenhouse gas in this sector remain elusive not only in Sonoma County where more than 50 percent of greenhouse gas is produced, but also throughout the country. Solid Waste: Sonoma County must continue to aggressively maximize composting and recycling of organic material such as food waste and construction and demolition debris. Additionally, Sonoma County should prepare to capitalize on emerging opportunities to convert waste into energy. Carbon Sequestration: Sonoma County can maximize carbon sequestration by preserving and managing its forests, agricultural and wild lands, and setting a bold goal for planting more urban and suburban trees. Financing: Financing is a critical though often unacknowledged part of solutions in all sectors discussed above. Tracking Progress and Building Awareness and Support: Sonoma County needs a systematic approach to tracking and reporting its climate protection progress, and for publicly recognizing successful efforts. 10

11 RECOMMENDATIONS 1.0 Renewable Energy 1.1 Optimize Sonoma Clean Power to significantly and rapidly reduce GHG emissions 1.2 Support local renewable energy development by considering a reduction in solar permitting fees, using online permitting, and requiring that all new developments install solar 1.3 Integrate local renewable energy development, energy efficiency, demand response, intelligent grid management, and financing 2.0 Energy Efficiency 2.1 Identify and implement best practices for aggressively increasing the energy efficiency of buildings 2.2 Expand and strengthen energy use disclosure requirements 2.3 Develop a commercial commissioning / retro-commissioning program 2.4 Use public-private partnerships such as performance contracts for municipal buildings 3.0 Transportation and Land Use 3.1 Accelerate the electrification of the transportation sector 3.2 Expand transportation demand management programs 3.3 Require that growth in new and existing developments be zero-carbon, i.e., energy efficient and renewable energy generating, city-centered, walkable, bikable, transit-oriented, and mixed-use 3.4 Prioritize funding for active (non-motorized) modes of transportation 4.0 Solid Waste 4.1 Work toward zero waste by maximizing recycling, composting, and diversion of organic material from the landfill 4.2 Capitalize on emerging opportunities to convert waste into energy 5.0 Agriculture and Forestry 5.1 Support agricultural practices that increase carbon sequestration 5.2 Support forestry practices that increase carbon sequestration 6.0 Financing and Fees 6.1 Use proven and develop new financing mechanisms to accelerate implementation of recommended measures 7.0 Tracking progress and building awareness and support 7.1 Measure and report Sonoma County’s progress toward its climate protection goals 7.2 Build Sonoma County’s awareness and support for climate protection 11

12 RENEWABLE ENERGY 1.1 Optimize Sonoma Clean Power to significantly and rapidly reduce GHG emissions 1.2 Support local renewable energy development by considering a reduction in solar permitting fees, using online permitting, and requiring that all new developments install solar 1.3 Integrate local renewable energy development, energy efficiency, demand response, intelligent grid management, and financing 12

13 RENEWABLE ENERGY “CCA” = Sonoma Clean Power Procure 100% clean: Palo Alto & DC Offer “Deep Green” power (Marin and Sonoma) SOLAR: Lower (Sacramento and SF) or remove fees (Santa Monica and Anaheim) Online permitting (San Francisco) Batteries for storage Group buying of solar based on geography (LA, Portland and Washington D.C.) Smart grids (Silicon Valley, Fort Collins) Anaerobic digestion (San Jose) 13

14 ENERGY EFFICIENCY 2.1 Identify and implement best practices for aggressively increasing the energy efficiency of buildings 2.2 Expand and strengthen energy use disclosure requirements 2.3 Develop a commercial commissioning / retro-commissioning program 2.4 Use public-private partnerships such as performance contracts for municipal buildings 14

15 ENERGY EFFICIENCY Energy use disclosure ordinance (Austin, New York, Chicago, Seattle, Boston, Berkeley) Commercial commissioning and retro- commissioning programs (LA and NYC) Green building ordinances (San Rafael) Energy performance contracts (Houston) 15

16 TRANSPORTATION & LAND USE 3.1 Accelerate the electrification of the transportation sector 3.2 Expand transportation demand management programs 3.3 Require that growth in new and existing developments be zero-carbon, i.e., energy efficient and renewable energy generating, city-centered, walkable, bikable, transit-oriented, and mixed-use 3.4 Prioritize funding for active (non-motorized) modes of transportation 16

17 Be EV-ready (Austin, San Rafael, Vancouver, Boston…) TDM (Montgomery County, Berkeley, Boston, SF, King County, Portland…) Transit Oriented Development (Portland…) Active Transportation (Minneapolis, Portland, Seattle, Montreal, Chicago, D.C. NYC, Boston) 17 TRANSPORTATION & LAND USE

18 SOLID WASTE 4.1 Work toward zero waste by maximizing recycling, composting, and diversion of organic material from the landfill 4.2 Capitalize on emerging opportunities to convert waste into energy 18

19 SOLID WASTE Address commercial food waste (Massachusetts) C&D Ordinance Pay as you throw ordinance Anaerobic Digestion (San Jose) 19

20 AGRICULTURE & FORESTRY 5.1 Support agricultural practices that increase carbon sequestration 5.2 Support forestry practices that increase carbon sequestration 20

21 AGRICULTURE & FORESTRY Preserve farm and rangelands and forests (Marin Carbon Project) Partner with Academic Institutions to inform farmers Tree plantings 21

22 FINANCING & FEES 6.1 Use proven and develop new financing mechanisms to accelerate implementation of recommended measures 22

23 FINANCING & FEES PACE Financing Carbon Taxes (Arcata, Boulder) Carbon Fund (SF) Crowd-funding (SF) Collaborative Procurement (Silicon Valley) 23

24 TRACKING PROGRESS & BUILDING AWARENESS & SUPPORT 7.1 Measure and report Sonoma County’s progress toward its climate protection goals 7.2 Build Sonoma County’s awareness and support for climate protection 24

25 TRACKING PROGRESS & BUILDING AWARENESS & SUPPORT Track it Put it online Make it easy to read Update regularly (Portland, Berkeley, New York City, Seattle, Vancouver…) 25

26 THANK YOU 26


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