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EXPERIENCING THE CITY Greater Portland Landmarks Introduction to Urban Planning.

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Presentation on theme: "EXPERIENCING THE CITY Greater Portland Landmarks Introduction to Urban Planning."— Presentation transcript:

1 EXPERIENCING THE CITY Greater Portland Landmarks Introduction to Urban Planning

2 Experiencing the City  Forward Greater Portland Landmarks (GPL) promotes preservation and revitalization historic building neighborhoods and landscapes and encourages high-quality new architecture to enhance the livability and economic vitality of Portland and the surrounding communities. The work of GPL began in 1961 after the unfortunate demolition of one of Portland’s greatest historical markers, Union Station. In the strategic plan for the organization, education was identified as a high priority. Therefore, this unit on experiencing the city was developed to enable middle school students to learn about urban planning and experience the cities and town

3 Experiencing the City We would appreciate hearing back from you about your experiences, successes and challenges. Please us at:  Introduction  Experiencing the City is an introduction to urban planning. Using the concepts and activities in this unit, teachers can take their students through a process involving evaluating and analyzing a city or neighborhood from multiple perspectives. Students will have the opportunity to learn how cities came to be, what infrastructures are needed to keep them running, and how cities respond to the needs of people and organizations that use them.  Although many of the activities relate to Portland, there are lessons such as mapping your own neighborhood that apply to all towns. Lessons can be adapted for other cities such as Lewiston or Bangor. In addition, teachers and students can survey or research their own community to identify an issue or local need in which they may want to get involved.  Links to resources can be found at the end of this presentation.

4 Experiencing the City Activities  1. What are the Physical Elements Which Make Up a City? ( brainstorming)  2. Introduction to the Issues and Vocabulary to Urban Planning  3. Illustrations of Urban Development (slide show of Portland)  4. Identifying Key Components of a Neighborhood (mapping)  5. Results of Urban Planning (walking tour)  6. Analysis of Neighborhood (old maps of Portland)  7. Primary Source Research (new maps of Portland)  8. Who is Responsible for Changes? ( Guest speakers )

5 Experiencing the City ACTIVITY 1 What are the Physical Elements Which Make up a City? Purpose: To identify the basic building blocks that make up a city as well as identify the cultural elements which give a city its character Goal: Students will come up with a list of physical and cultural elements of a city from which students will develop the vocabulary of urban planning Activity: In groups or individually, students will develop lists of the physical and cultural elements of a city that they share with the class. A master list will be developed using urban planning vocabulary. ●Physical examples: Transportation: Roads, railroads, bridges, walkways, bike paths., buses. Buildings: Hospitals, churches, schools, homes, town or city halls. Signage: Road signs, store signs, directional signs. Open Spaces: Parks, yards, waterfront, plazas, trails. Infrastructure: Water, sewer, electric, gas, phones, cable. Neighborhoods ●Cultural Examples: Climate, diversity of people, language, economy. After sharing information they have gathered information have then answer the following : After developing your lists, what do you think urban planning is? The student’s original lists and class master list should be saved for activity 2.

6 Experiencing the City  Activity 2 Introduction to the Issues and Vocabulary of Urban Planning Purpose: To reinforce urban planning vocabulary and issues. Goals: Students will create a collage that draws from the information on their flip charts and master list from Activity 1. Activity: Students will collect magazines, journals, and newspapers that contain images of urban planning vocabulary and issues. Using the lists from Activity 1, students will create collages illustrating the vocabulary. ►Hang the collages around the room so that they can serve as visual reminders of urban planning concepts and provide “talking points” for continuing discussion. Students may start to collect written articles on urban planning issues.  See vocabulary lists on next page

7 Experiencing the City

8 Vocabulary

9 Vocabulary

10 Vocabulary

11 Vocabulary

12 Vocabulary

13 Activity 3 Purpose: To illustrate the urban planning vocabulary by viewing visual examples of Portland’s development. To introduce the effects of urban planning in Portland. Goal: Students will identify the effects of urban planning. Students will compare and contrast urban planning issues. Activity: Students will view a slide show presented by the teacher or on their laptops and participate in discussions pertaining to individual slides. Slide show can be accessed on our website at : Activity 3 Purpose: To illustrate the urban planning vocabulary by viewing visual examples of Portland’s development. To introduce the effects of urban planning in Portland. Goal: Students will identify the effects of urban planning. Students will compare and contrast urban planning issues. Activity: Students will view a slide show presented by the teacher or on their laptops and participate in discussions pertaining to individual slides. Slide show can be accessed on our website at : Congress Street

14 Experiencing the City Activity 4 Identifying Key Components of a Neighborhood Purpose: To begin looking at neighborhoods and communities in terms of urban planning. Goal: Students will identify key elements and cultural traits in their own neighborhoods. Students will complete a map of their school to be used as a template for their own neighborhood map that will include elements such as a road, buildings, infrastructure and transportation/parking. Continued

15 Experiencing the City Other Map Resources :

16 Experiencing the City Activity 5 Results of Urban Planning Purpose: To reinforce what students have learned about urban planning. Goal: Students and a teacher or Greater Portland Landmarks docent will identify the real results of urban planning. Activity: Students and teachers will complete a walking tour through certain neighborhoods of Portland, starting at the corner of India and Commercial Streets on the water-side. Worksheets can be printed out from our website: Walking Tour

17 Experiencing the City Walking Tour Today, we will be taking a walk in Portland, looking at the real results of urban planning. As we stroll along, think about the elements we saw in the slide show that make a city welcoming, usable and friendly. You will be looking at: ● Sidewalks and crosswalks ● Types of buildings such as commercial, residential and retail ● Examples of adaptive re-use ● Types of infrastructure ● Availability of amenities ● Parking solutions You will be given a worksheet that you will use throughout the tour to answer questions and sketch.

18 Experiencing the City Activity 6 Analysis of Neighborhood Maps Purpose: Students will analyze maps of their own neighborhoods. Goal: Students will compare and contrast key elements of their neighborhoods and also begin to look at their neighborhoods like urban planners would. Activity: Students will display their neighborhood maps. They will be asked to look critically at each of their maps and discuss similarities and differences in their neighborhoods. Challenge them to identify what is missing. For example: Do all neighborhoods have public parks? Is there adequate parking? What are the people like in each neighborhood? Ask students to think about use. Are there examples of public and private use within their neighborhood? Next, students will write an essay on the things that they feel work and don’t work in their neighborhood in regards to urban planning issues. Click on the following link for access to Portland Neighborhood maps

19 Experiencing the City Activity 7 Primary Source Research Activity 7 Primary Source Research Purpose: To review the concepts of primary source and secondary source information, as well as explore the results of urban planning over time. Goal: Students will discuss their answers to the following questions about the city using primary sources. Activity: Students will compare and contrast information on urban changes by using both historical and present day maps of Portland. (Photographs and documents may also be used.) Questions Why is Portland located where it is? Why did it become a city? What are some differences you see between old and new maps? Similarities? Do you think urban planning has worked in Portland? What are some changes that you think should occur in the future? Who is responsible for the changes in urban planning? See the next slide for resource information and historical maps.

20 Experiencing the City Portland 1828

21 Experiencing the City Portland 1690

22 Experiencing the City Activity 7 Resources The links to the right represent added resources for students to access when completing Activity 7.  Osher Map Library :  Google Earth :  Portland Maps:  Map Memory Network :  Osher Map Library :  Google Earth :  Portland Maps:  Map Memory Network :

23 Experiencing the City Activity 8 Who is responsible for Changes? Purpose: To introduce the people, the organizations and the institutions responsible for urban planning. Goal: Students will meet with key individuals responsible for urban planning in the area. They will discuss urban planning issues and interview these key people. Activity: Students will prepare questions pertaining to urban planning. Students will be responsible for creating a list of individuals who may be contacted to participate in a discussion with the class. Students will contact key individuals within their neighborhood, city or town to participate in these discussions. Participants will be asked to speak about their role in urban planning, followed by a question and answer session. Activity 8 Who is responsible for Changes? Purpose: To introduce the people, the organizations and the institutions responsible for urban planning. Goal: Students will meet with key individuals responsible for urban planning in the area. They will discuss urban planning issues and interview these key people. Activity: Students will prepare questions pertaining to urban planning. Students will be responsible for creating a list of individuals who may be contacted to participate in a discussion with the class. Students will contact key individuals within their neighborhood, city or town to participate in these discussions. Participants will be asked to speak about their role in urban planning, followed by a question and answer session. Examples include: City Planner Mayor Greater Portland Landmarks Preservation Officer Examples include: City Planner Mayor Greater Portland Landmarks Preservation Officer

24 Experiencing the City Resources for Educators LOCAL ORGANIZATIONS Cape Elizabeth Land Trust: http: Greater Portland Landmarks: Greater Portland Council of Government: TRAILS ORGANIZATIONS Falmouth Trails: Portland Trails http: Gorham Trails: East Coast Greenway: Eastern Trails Alliance: ARCHITECTURAL RESOURCES Center for Understanding the Built Environment: Center for Architecture and Preservation at Greater Portland Landmarks: SMRT: LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE Maine Olmsted Alliance: URBAN PLANNERS Maine State Planning Office: Portland Planning Office: American Planning Association: CONTINUED

25 Experiencing the City Resources for Educators TRANSPORTATION METRO Bus: Maine Department of Transportation: RIDESHARE: BICYCLES Bicycle Coalition of Maine: Bike The Coast of Maine: Alliance for Transportation Choice: CITY OF PORTLAND (This link will provide contact information for every department in the City of Portland) NEIGHBORHOOD ORGANIZATIONS Munjoy Hill Neighborhood Organizations: Friends of Deering Oaks: West End News: Portland Maine Neighborhood Associations: Bayside Neighborhood Association: North Deering Neighborhood Association: Back Cove Neighborhood Association: Friends of Riverton Trolley Park : Friends of Evergreen Cemetery: Friends of West End Cemetery:

26 Experiencing the City Resources for Educators SERVICE LEARNING ORGANIZATIONS Learning in Deed: KIDS Consortium: FOUNDATIONS AND FUNDING SOURCES The Dunn Foundation: Project SEED: Portland Partnership: HISTORIC PRESERVATION National Trust for Historic Preservation: Maine Historical Society: Greater Portland Landmarks: Maine Preservation: PUBLIC ART Portland Arts and Cultural Alliance: Portland Museum of Art: Maine College of Art: Spiral Arts: EDUCATIONAL SUPPORT Portland Partnership: Muskie School at the University of Southern Maine: MAPS Delorme Maps: Osher Map Library: USGS Topographic Maps:

27 Experiencing the City Credits PowerPoint presentation created by Joan Bennert, Dianne Manning and the staff at Greater Portland Landmarks Graphics by Dianne Manning All historical photographs courtesy of Maine Memory Network


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