Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Operative Plasterers’ and Cement Masons’ International Association (OPCMIA) Hexavalent Chromium in Portland Cement 1.

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "Operative Plasterers’ and Cement Masons’ International Association (OPCMIA) Hexavalent Chromium in Portland Cement 1."— Presentation transcript:

1 Operative Plasterers’ and Cement Masons’ International Association (OPCMIA) Hexavalent Chromium in Portland Cement 1

2 2 2 Program Introduction Consider: Does your company work with portland cement? Workers = Immediate employees and subcontractors = Your responsibility There are 1,300,000 workers in 30 occupations that may be at risk. Topics: Costs associated with injuries and illness The presence of hexavalent chromium in portland cement Hexavalent chromium exposure Exposure prevention and control Worker training and recordkeeping requirements

3 3 3 Program Introduction OSHA hazard communication: Worker training must address:  Hazards associated with hexavalent chromium  Signs and symptoms of hexavalent chromium-related health effects  Preventative measures (PPE, exposure controls, hygiene)  Worker access to hygiene facilities, PPE, and information (e.g., MSDSs)

4 4 4 Program Introduction Hexavalent chromium: Chemical used in the manufacturing of portland cement Classified as a carcinogen (inhalation and ingestion) Dermal contact can lead to allergic contact dermatitis (ACD)  ACD can be a debilitating skin disorder that can adversely affect an employee’s health and ability to work

5 5 5 Program Introduction Allergic contact dermatitis (ACD): Skin disease that may occur from working with wet portland cement Immunologic reaction caused by a sensitization to hexavalent chromium Once sensitized, exposure to small amounts can trigger a strong reaction Severe cases of sensitization may become a permanent disability Sensitization may develop years after working with cement and may not be confined to the area of contact Difficult to cure, exposure prevention is key

6 6 6 Program Introduction Hazard assessment: Employer must identify areas where a hazard is present or is likely to be present from skin or eye contact with hexavalent chromium A walk-through survey of the workplace is recommended to identify sources of worker hexavalent chromium exposure A review of workplace injury and illness records is recommended

7 7 7 Program Introduction Hazard assessment (cont.): Exposures must be evaluated, taking into account factors such as:  The acidity or alkalinity of the hexavalent chromium-containing compound or mixture  The magnitude and duration of exposure Where a hazard is identified, the employer must select the hazard control measure or measures (e.g. PPE) needed to protect workers  Employer must provide PPE that is in good working condition

8 8 8 Program Introduction Review: You are responsible for the health and safety of your workers 1,300,000 workers in 30 occupations regularly exposed to wet portland cement products OSHA hazard communication standard requires hexavalent chromium training Hexavalent chromium (carcinogen – inhalation/ingestion) can cause Allergic Contact Dermatitis (ACD) Employers must conduct a hazard assessment prior to beginning work

9 9 9 Costs associated with injuries and illness

10 10 Objectives: Identify contractor costs that are associated with injuries and illness Explain what Experience Modifications Rates are and how they impact a company’s insurance rates Costs associated with injuries and illness

11 11 Statistics: There are 7 million workers in the construction trades. Construction trade accidents account for 370,000 injuries per year (Avg. -1,000/day). Construction companies spend $170 billion/year on costs associated with injuries/illness. Workers who suffer a disabling injury can lose 40% of their income over a 5-year period. Accident and injury costs account for 6.5% of construction dollars spent. OSHA citations and fines can affect the bottom line of a company. Injuries and illness = Waste Costs associated with injuries and illness

12 12 Costs associated with injuries and illness Statistics (cont.): Skin disorders comprise 35% of all occupational related diseases. ACD accounts for 20% of all cases of occupational dermatitis. ACD costs workers, insurers, companies, and the government between $135 million and $679 million a year. Wet cement is the #1 cause of occupational skin disease in the U.S. Portland cement accounts for 25% of work related skin problems world wide.

13 13 Costs associated with injuries and illness Statistics (cont.): Concrete workers in the U.S. report 4 times more lost work days for skin problems than do all other construction trades. Of the 7 million construction workers in the U.S., 8% to 22% of them will come in contact with wet portland cement. 5% to 15% of workers that come in contact with portland cement may suffer from ACD at a rate 25 times that of the general population.

14 14 It may be worse: Most skin problems are not reported:  Believe it’s part of the job  Fear of embarrassment A recent survey revealed: Costs associated with injuries and illness Skin problems:Doctor visits: 29% 71% Yes No 71% report rashes, bumps, red skin, burning, itching, scaling, fissures, pain. 7 93% Yes No Only 7% report doctor visits or lost time. %

15 15 Costs associated with injuries and illness: More Compensation Claims =  Higher EMRs =  Higher Insurance Rates Time away by experienced workers Training replacements Retraining for injured workers Light duty workloads Post-traumatic repercussions Costs associated with injuries and illness

16 16 Costs associated with injuries and illness Experience Modification Rates (EMRs): Insurance industry: Developed experience rating systems as means of determining premiums for workers’ compensation insurance  Rating systems: Consider average workers’ compensation losses for a given firm’s type of work and amount of payroll, and predict the dollar amount of expected losses to be paid out by that employer in a designated rating period (usually 3 years)  Rating is based on comparisons with other firms doing similar work  Losses incurred by employer for the rating period are then compared to the expected losses to develop the experience rating (or EMR). Workers’ compensation insurance premiums for a contractor are adjusted by this rate (the EMR)

17 17 Costs associated with injuries and illness Summary: Injuries and illness can increase costs:  Insurance rates  Training and retraining  OSHA citations and fines  Absenteeism:  Faulty products  Disrupted work assignments Worker training is crucial in minimizing job related injuries and illness

18 18 The presence of hexavalent chromium in portland cement

19 19 The presence of hexavalent chromium in portland cement Objectives: Recognize the presence of hexavalent chromium in portland cement Identify products containing portland cement Identify people who are exposed to hexavalent chromium in portland cement

20 20 The presence of hexavalent chromium in portland cement Portland cement: 80% of all U.S. ready-mix concrete contains portland cement Portland cement is universally abrasive Portland cement becomes extremely alkaline when wet

21 21 The presence of hexavalent chromium in portland cement Portland cement (cont.): Occupations health hazards of portland cement include:  Inhalation  Dermal  Eye hazards

22 22 Hexavalent chromium: Occupations health hazards result from contaminants generally found in portland cement, including hexavalent chromium 83 of 89 U.S. and Canadian manufacturers’ portland cement contains detectable hexavalent chromium Hexavalent chromium has been classified as a carcinogen  Inhalation and ingestion The presence of hexavalent chromium in portland cement

23 23 Hexavalent chromium (cont.): Hexavalent chromium (Cr[VI]) is the primary cause of allergic contact dermatitis (ACD) from portland cement Hexavalent chromium is present in portland cement in generally trace amounts Hexavalent chromium is a contaminant that enters the cement mixture through raw materials or during its manufacturing Generally there is less than 20 µg hexavalent chromium per gram of cement, or 20 parts per million (ppm) The presence of hexavalent chromium in portland cement

24 24 Products that contain portland cement: Concrete Mortar Plaster Spackle Stucco Terrazzo Tile grout The presence of hexavalent chromium in portland cement

25 25  Hod carrier  Plasterer  Terrazzo worker  Tile setter Hexavalent chromium: More than 1,300,000 workers in 30 occupations are generally exposed to wet portland cement products:  Bricklayers  Carpenters  Cement masons  Concrete finishers  Ready-mixed concrete truck driver The presence of hexavalent chromium in portland cement

26 26 Discussion Questions 1.Portland cement occupies what percentage of all U.S ready-mix concrete? 2.What are the three primary areas of the body that portland cement can affect? The presence of hexavalent chromium in portland cement

27 27 The presence of hexavalent chromium in portland cement Discussion Questions 1.Portland cement occupies what percentage of all U.S ready-mix concrete? (80 percent.) 2.What are the three primary areas of the body that portland cement can affect? (Lungs/inhalation, dermis or skin through contact, eye contamination and associated hazards.)

28 28 Any Questions? Summary: 80% of all U.S. ready-mix concrete contains portland cement Hexavalent chromium is present in portland cement in generally trace amounts Hexavalent chromium is the primary cause of allergic contact dermatitis (ACD) in portland cement Types of products that contain portland cement Types of workers that are exposed to portland cement The presence of hexavalent chromium in portland cement

29 29 Hexavalent chromium exposure

30 30 Objectives: Explain the routes of entry and the factors that cause hexavalent chromium exposure Define sensitization Recognize symptoms and health effects of hexavalent chromium exposure Describe permissible exposure limits (PELs) for hexavalent chromium Hexavalent chromium exposure

31 31 Hexavalent chromium exposure Routes of exposure: Inhalation – Through the air Absorption – Through skin Ingestion – Through eating or drinking Remember: Cement dust can react with the eye’s mucous membrane and skin Grinding concrete releases cement dust Always wear respirator and eye protection when grinding

32 32 Hexavalent chromium exposure Consider: How you use wet cement helps determine whether it causes skin problems  How long does it contact your skin?  How often do you use it?  Is their mechanical trauma or abrasion of your skin?  Sources of mechanical trauma include:  Friction between your hand and your tool  Friction between your hand, glove, and tool  The pressure needed to use a tool  The aggregate in concrete

33 33 Hexavalent chromium exposure Environmental factors: Environmental factors can damage skin and increase the risk of skin problems from wet cement Cold temperature:  Dries the skin  Causes microscopic cracks  Reduces awareness of chemical contact by reducing blood flow at the skin surface

34 34 Hexavalent chromium exposure Environmental factors (cont.): Heat, humidity, and sun:  Cause sweating – sweat dissolves chemicals, which de-fat the skin, causing microscopic damage  Heat increases blood flow at the skin surface and increases the rate at which skin absorbs chemicals  Humidity keeps sweat from evaporating  Sun burns the skin, reacts with some chemicals to cause light sensitization, and can cause cancer

35 35 Hexavalent chromium exposure Individual factors: Individual factors may affect skin problems caused by wet cement, including:  Pre-existing dermatitis  Predisposition  Knowledge  Personal practices There is no predictable order to the development of skin problems You must take protective measures to reduce exposure as much as possible

36 36 Hexavalent chromium exposure Health effects: Sensitization:  Sensitization is an immune system response  It may be a local or a widespread reaction  Usually, the chemical or substance causes no change on first contact  During the period of incubation (sensitization), your immune system alters cells invisibly to fight the foreign substance  Once you are sensitized, small amounts trigger a strong reaction

37 37 Hexavalent chromium exposure Health effects (cont.): Sensitization:  Allergic contact dermatitis (ACD) is a serious risk for construction workers who use wet portland cement  Many people cannot tolerate further exposure to the chemical  A sensitization may develop even after you’ve worked with wet cement for many years  Hexavalent chromium in cement is the primary cause of ACD

38 38 Hexavalent chromium exposure Health effects (cont.): Sensitization:  Avoid using creams and lotions containing lanolin (some individuals may be allergic to lanolin)  Do not apply creams or lotions while on the job  Contaminated gloves can trap cement against the skin

39 39 Hexavalent chromium exposure Permissible exposure limits: OSHA’s PELs for both portland cement and particulates not otherwise regulated (PNOR) are 15 mg/m 3 as total dust, and 5 mg/m 3 for the respirable fraction OSHA’s PELs Because there are only trace amounts of hexavalent chromium in portland cement, these PELs could provide adequate protection against hexavalent chromium inhalation If maintaining portland cement exposure levels below the PEL is not possible through engineering controls, exposed employees must wear respiratory protection

40 40 Hexavalent chromium exposure Exposure levels: Activities where high levels of exposure to hexavalent chromium may occur in construction include:  Terrazzo work  Mixing mortar  Jobsite mixing of concrete

41 41 Discussion Questions 1.In what three ways can an individual be exposed to Hexavalent chromium? 2.A common sensitization (or reaction) for construction workers who use wet portland cement is called what? Hexavalent chromium exposure

42 42 Discussion Questions 1.In what three ways can an individual be exposed to Hexavalent chromium? (Inhalation, absorption, ingestion.) 2.A common sensitization (or reaction) for construction workers who use wet portland cement is called what? (Allergic contact dermatitis [ACD].) Hexavalent chromium exposure

43 43 Any Questions? Hexavalent chromium exposure Summary: Your workers who use portland cement may be exposed to hexavalent chromium through inhalation, absorption, and ingestion Environmental and individual factors can affect exposure Sensitization may develop after working with wet cement for many years, leading to ACD PELs for both portland cement and particulates not otherwise regulated (PNOR) are 15 mg/m 3 as total dust, and 5 mg/m 3 for the respirable fraction where listed

44 44 Exposure prevention and control

45 45 Exposure prevention and control Objectives: Identify methods for preventing and controlling worker exposure to hexavalent chromium in portland cement, including:  Hazard control measures  PPE and clothing  Work practices  Sanitation  Hazard communication and assessment

46 46 Hazard control measures: Engineering controls Administrative controls Use of PPE Exposure prevention and control

47 47 Engineering controls: Designing facility, equipment, or process to remove hazards, or substitute the process, equipment, or materials to lesson hazards Enclosure of hazards using enclosed cabs Isolation of hazards (e.g., interlocks, machine guards, shields, or curtains) Removal or redirection of hazards using ventilation control systems (local exhaust, general ventilation) Exposure prevention and control

48 48 Administrative controls: Written operating procedures, work permits, safe work practices Exposure time limitations Monitoring use of highly hazardous materials or dangerous equipment Alarms and warning signs Buddy systems and training Exposure prevention and control

49 49 Use of PPE: When engineering controls are not feasible or do not totally eliminate a hazard While engineering controls are being developed When safe work practices do not provide sufficient additional protection During emergencies when engineering controls may not be feasible Exposure prevention and control

50 50 Exposure prevention and control PPE requirements may not be the same for every job site Employers are responsible for providing their workers with appropriate PPE that is in good working condition Protective clothing and equipment: The type of protective clothing and equipment needed depends on:  The potential for exposure  The conditions of use in the workplace

51 51 Exposure prevention and control Protective clothing and equipment (cont.): Examples of protective clothing and equipment that may be used include:  Gloves  Knee pads  Long-sleeved shirts  Aprons  Coveralls  Boots  Foot coverings  Goggles  Respirators

52 52 Exposure prevention and control Protective clothing and equipment (cont.): In some instances gloves may be all that is necessary to effectively protect a worker from hexavalent chromium exposure In other situations, more extensive measures such as coveralls, head coverings, and goggles may be necessary Employers must provide protective clothing and equipment, and must ensure that it is used when required The chemical and physical properties of the compound or mixture may also influence the choice of clothing and equipment to use

53 53 Exposure prevention and control Protective clothing and equipment (cont.): Other factors that should be considered:  Size  Flexibility  Cut and tear resistance OSHA has issued a booklet that provides more information on assessment of workplace hazards and selection of protective clothing and equipment

54 54 Discussion Questions 1.The type of protective clothing and equipment needed to protect employees from Hexavalent chromium depends on what two factors? 2.When hexavalent chromium related hazards exist, is it the employers or employees responsibility to select the appropriate level of personal protective equipment? Exposure prevention and control

55 55 Discussion Questions 1.The type of protective clothing and equipment needed to protect employees from Hexavalent chromium depends on what two factors? (The potential for exposure, the conditions of use in the workplace.) 2.When hexavalent chromium related hazards exist, is it the employers or employees responsibility to select the appropriate level of personal protective equipment? (Employers.) Exposure prevention and control

56 56 Exposure prevention and control Wearing protective clothing: Wear long sleeves taped inside gauntlet gloves Tape pants inside rubber boots to keep cement out of your boots If you kneel in wet cement, wear knee pads and use knee boards

57 57 Exposure prevention and control Wearing protective clothing (cont.): If wet cement soaks clothes, remove them immediately Keep extra work clothes on site or in your car Store work clothes at work or take them home in a separate container Launder work clothes separately to protect you and your family  Run the washer empty after doing work clothes

58 58 Glove selection: Make sure gloves are the right type for the work you are performing Manufacturers recommend butyl or nitrile gloves for cement Gauntlet gloves are best Wear gloves that fit – loose gloves and clothing allow contaminants to get trapped Avoid cotton and leather gloves Exposure prevention and control

59 59 Exposure prevention and control Proper glove use: Follow manufacturer’s instructions Never turn down the gauntlets Keep insides of gloves clean and dry Handle gloves by insides only Decontaminate gloves weekly or whenever they are contaminated Store gloves away from tools and materials in a cool, dark, dry place Practice proper hygiene Change and throw gloves away when they become contaminated on the inside

60 60 Exposure prevention and control Proper glove use (cont.): Throw out grossly contaminated gloves – if in doubt, throw them out! Throw out disposable gloves daily Clean off gloves before removing them Remove gloves and wash hands before eating, drinking, smoking, or using the restroom

61 61 Cleaning and replacement of protective clothing and equipment: The employer must clean, launder, repair and replace protective clothing and equipment regularly:  Ensures that clothing and equipment continues to protect workers  Standards do not specify how often clothing and equipment must be cleaned, repaired, or replaced  Appropriate time intervals are based on:  Types of clothing and equipment used  Level of hexavalent chromium exposure  Other circumstances in the workplace Exposure prevention and control

62 62 Exposure prevention and control Cleaning and replacement of protective clothing and equipment (cont.): Employer responsibility for ensuring work clothes and equipment are properly cleaned Clothing and equipment should be laundered or cleaned in a manner that minimizes skin or eye contact with hexavalent chromium and prevents exposure in excess of the PEL Workers who clean or launder hexavalent chromium contaminated items must be aware of the associated hazards so that they can take appropriate protective measures

63 63 Exposure prevention and control Activity: Glove demonstration

64 64 Exposure prevention and control Activity: Glove demonstration (cont.) What should you do before putting on gloves? Why is it important to do so?

65 65 Exposure prevention and control Activity: Glove demonstration (cont.) 1.Choose the appropriate gloves for you hand size 2.Inspect gloves before donning 3.Put on at least one glove, then try to pick up objects such as pencils, paper clips, nails How flexible are the gloves? How easy is it to do other ordinary tasks? 4.Hold tools with gloves on 5.Evaluate the gloves they are wearing for fit and usefulness

66 66 Exposure prevention and control Discussion Questions 1.How should gloves be stored? 2.When should gloves be changed or thrown away?

67 67 Exposure prevention and control Discussion Questions 1.How should gloves be stored? (Away from tools and materials in a cool, dark, dry place.) 2.When should gloves be changed or thrown away? (When they become contaminated on the inside or when they become grossly contaminated.)

68 68 Exposure prevention and control Safe practices for glove removal:

69 69 Exposure prevention and control Best practices: Reduce the amount of skin exposed and the amount of time the skin is exposed to wet cement:  Keep your exposure as low as possible  Cover as much skin as you can  Keep wet cement off you as you work  If using protective clothing, check it to make sure it is in good condition and without rips or tears  Clean up as soon as possible

70 70 Exposure prevention and control Best practices (cont.): Avoid occlusion:  No jewelry at work  No barrier creams:  Sometimes called invisible gloves, barrier creams are not recommended for work with cement  Applying the cream in the work area can occlude contaminants on your skin

71 71 Exposure prevention and control Best practices (cont.): Avoid occlusion:  No creams, lotions, or skin- softening products like Vaseline and lanolin  These products soften skin by penetrating it and can “pull” contaminants through with them (trapping them)

72 72 Exposure prevention and control Best practices (cont.): No cement in gloves and boots:  Often the cause of cement burns is wet cement occluded against skin by boots  Remove clothing if cement soaked  Seek medical treatment for any persistent skin problems, even a minor one  Protect cuts and abrasions with waterproof dressings at work – change the dressing to a porous one after work

73 73 Exposure prevention and control Best practices (cont.): Only clean, dry, pH-normal hands go into gloves:  If you remove your gloves during the workday, wash and dry hands before putting them on again  Putting gloves over contaminated hands traps contaminants against your skin  Repeatedly washing your tools in the same bucket will increase the pH of the water

74 74 Exposure prevention and control Sanitation: The OSHA sanitation standard ( (f)):  Requires employers to “provide adequate washing facilities… in near proximity to the worksite [that must] be so equipped as to enable employees to remove such substances.” Washing facilities must include:  Clean water  Non-alkaline soap  Clean towels

75 75 Exposure prevention and control Washing hands: Plain water does not remove cement residue or restore pH balance Use a pH-neutral or slightly acidic soap to remove the residue and a buffer or neutralizing product to neutralize the pH (e.g., Neutralite) Wash with pH-neutral or slightly acidic soap at home and at work

76 76 Exposure prevention and control Washing hands (cont.): The damage to skin from alkaline exposure may not always be visible pH-neutral or slightly acidic soaps (e.g., Softsoap, pHisoderm) are closer to the pH of healthy skin Look for sensitive skin, unscented, or fragrance-free versions of soaps Use soaps that do not contain lanolin, limonene, perfume Avoid alkaline or abrasive cleaners Wash regularly throughout the day Never use solvents to wash your hands

77 77 Exposure prevention and control Washing hands (cont.): Dry hands thoroughly with a clean towel or wipe before putting on gloves Clean nail beds and creases between fingers Wash hands before breaks, before lunch, and at the end of the day

78 78 Activity: pH Testing Exposure prevention and control

79 79 Exposure prevention and control Activity: pH Testing (cont.) Supplies: Dry portland cement Household vinegar One gallon distilled water pH strips Color scales Clear plastic glasses Plastic spoons Bars of soap pHisoderm soap, liquid Softsoap, or another pH-neutral or slightly acidic soap OPTIONAL: Neutralite and/or Mason’s Hand Rinse

80 80 Activity: pH Testing (cont.) 1.Dip a pH strip in distilled water 2.Determine result 3.Compare result on pH scale Exposure prevention and control

81 81 Activity: pH Testing (cont.) Exposure prevention and control

82 82 Activity: pH Testing (cont.) 4.Add water to cement and stir 5.Dip pH strip in the cement solution, determine result, and compare result to pH scale 6.Count how many times more alkaline cement is, compared to skin Exposure prevention and control

83 83 Activity: pH Testing (cont.) 7.Dip a pH strip in the vinegar, determine result, and compare result on pH scale 8.Dip a pH strip in the cement solution again and compare with pH scale Exposure prevention and control

84 84 Activity: pH Testing (cont.) Exposure prevention and control Add vinegar to cement solution Dip a new pH strip in the new solution, determines result, and compare result to the pH scale Wet the bar soap, test with a pH strip, and compare results to the pH scale Pour Softsoap or pHisoderm in your hand, test it with a pH strip, and compare results to the pH scale

85 85 Discussion Questions 1.What did adding vinegar to the cement solution do to the pH level of the mixture? 2.What would washing with bar soap after being exposed to cement do to human skin? 3.What would washing with pH-neutral soap after being exposed to cement do to human skin? Exposure prevention and control

86 86 Discussion Questions 1.What did adding vinegar to the cement solution do to the pH level of the mixture? (Vinegar can neutralize the alkalinity of cement.) 2.What would washing with bar soap after being exposed to cement do to human skin? (The alkalinity of the soap combined with the alkalinity of the cement can further harm skin.) 3.What would washing with pH-neutral soap after being exposed to cement do to human skin? (pH-neutral soap restores the skin’s pH levels after exposure to cement.) Exposure prevention and control

87 87 Exposure prevention and control Take pH strips and a glass of water to your vehicles Dip strips in water one at a time and place on steering wheel, seats, and other locations inside the vehicle (also test the back seats) If you have gotten cement water on your hands, test the pH of the skin Determine results and compare results to the pH scale Activity: pH Testing (cont.)

88 88 How can we control pH? Exposure prevention and control

89 89 Exposure prevention and control Conclusion: Cement is strongly alkaline Vinegar or a buffer can neutralize alkalinity Construction workers should not use alkaline soap Workers may be taking cement dust home in their vehicles Workers should avoid wearing work clothes home Wet cement is one billion times more alkaline than human skin Wash hands before eating, smoking, or going to the bathroom to avoid ingesting or spreading contaminants Wash hands before putting gloves on to avoid occlusion

90 90 Exposure prevention and control Any Questions? Summary: Hazard control measures (engineering controls, administrative controls, use of PPE) Keep wet cement out of gloves and boots by taping sleeves and pants Only insert clean, dry hands into gloves When washing hands use clean water, non- alkaline soap, and clean towels Protective clothing and equipment is determined by the employers after hazards have been assessed If wet cement soaks clothes or gets inside gloves or boots, remove them immediately

91 91 Worker training and recordkeeping requirements

92 92 Worker training and recordkeeping requirements Objectives: Identify the training requirements that workers must complete before being authorized to work with portland cement Identify employer record keeping requirements regarding cases of allergic contact dermatitis

93 93 Worker training and recordkeeping requirements Worker exposure training and rights: In order to work with portland cement, workers must be trained to:  Identify hazards associated with exposure to portland cement, including hazards associated with the cement’s hexavalent chromium content  Determine preventive measures, including proper use and care of PPE, and proper hygiene practices

94 94 Worker training and recordkeeping requirements Allergic contact dermatitis (ACD): Employer records each case of occupational dermatitis that meets the recordability criterion set by the OSHA Recordkeeping Handbook, Recording CriteriaOSHA Recordkeeping Handbook, Recording Criteria Employer informs workers of how to report their work-related illnesses and injuries

95 95 Worker training and recordkeeping requirements Any Questions? Summary: Employers must:  Train workers on hazards and preventive measurers  Keep records of occupational dermatitis related to hexavalent chromium exposure  Inform workers of how to report work- related illnesses and injuries

96 Program Review 96 Review: Hexavalent chromium found in portland cement can lead to allergic contact dermatitis (ACD) You must train your workers on the hazards associated with hexavalent chromium exposure You must provide appropriate PPE that is in good working condition Remind workers of best practices for working safely with products that contain hexavalent chromium Health and safety of your workers (immediate employees and subcontractors), is you responsibility

97 Program Complete 97


Download ppt "Operative Plasterers’ and Cement Masons’ International Association (OPCMIA) Hexavalent Chromium in Portland Cement 1."

Similar presentations


Ads by Google